[opendtv] Re: HDTV-Brochure_2005final

Bert said:
> Which suggests to me that even if HDTV later became
> an excuse for broadcasters to retain their allocated
> terrestrial spectrum, this was not the original
> intent of the concept. And more, terrestrial TV
> spectrum was not thought to be the way HDTV would be
> distributed. HDTV was instead, pure and simple, a
> better TV system, but challenging for distribution.

You've captured exactly the thought process of the time.

After our initial Advanced Television meeting the future agenda
was determined to be twofold:
1. Advancement of HDTV production systems
2. The improvement of the current analog broadcast system.

In support of item two, Farouja Labs developed an NTSC
based system which I believe they called Super NTSC.
They demonstrated the system at NAB (~1982) and it looked
very good. I believe that it incorporated a line doubled display 
but I don't recall the details.





----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Manfredi, Albert E" <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx>
To: "OpenDTV (E-mail)" <opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Wednesday, January 19, 2005 12:32 PM
Subject: [opendtv] Re: HDTV-Brochure_2005final


>> Although 1125-line (total) HDTV equipment appeared
>> at IEEE Intercon in New York in 1973 and 1974, the
>> big push for HDTV in the U.S. began with the SMPTE
>> winter conference in San Francisco in 1981 with an
>> NHK system brought over by CBS.  ... In July 1981,
>> CBS filed at the FCC in opposition to allowing DBS
>> in Ku-band saying that those frequencies would be
>> needed for broadcast HDTV.  At about the same time,
>> Joe Donahue of RCA consumer electronics touted the
>> widescreen nature of HDTV, noting that it was a
>> difference consumers could see even in newspaper
>> ads.
>
> Which suggests to me that even if HDTV later became
> an excuse for broadcasters to retain their allocated
> terrestrial spectrum, this was not the original
> intent of the concept. And more, terrestrial TV
> spectrum was not thought to be the way HDTV would be
> distributed. HDTV was instead, pure and simple, a
> better TV system, but challenging for distribution.
>
> At a 1986 IEEE Eastcon conference, we were told that
> there would be six HDTV channels, transmitted only
> via satellite. At the time, I thought this would be
> a loser. Because instead of replacing normal TV, it
> would be a side show, parallel to NTSC. A luxury for
> the few. (And not even a contender for the VHF and
> UHF TV bands.)
>
> But in 1991, when the FCC mandated that HDTV be
> spectrum compatible with NTSC, I started to get
> excited. As an integral part of an updated TV
> standard, it makes a lot of sense. And with JPEG
> and MPEG just being introduced at that time, HDTV
> was clearly technically feasible in 6 MHz.
>
>> This began as a Broadcaster initiative, almost two
>> decades ago, in response to the threat that the
>> FCC might authorize frequency sharing in the
>> "under-utilized" TV bands.
>
> The fact that broadcasters might have seized on
> HDTV as a way of retaining their terrestrial
> spectrum, *after the fact*, does not mean that this
> was HDTV's purpose.
>
> Bert
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:
>
> - Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
> FreeLists.org
>
> - By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
> unsubscribe in the subject line.
>
> 


 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: