RE: the Personal Computer was the greatest thing ever invented for the Blind

Know what you mean. I still get bank statements and stuff in braille and got
some library books sat here, but for some things it is easier to use the
computer. 

 

From: jfw-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:jfw-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf
Of Alan Dicey
Sent: 20 October 2010 18:14
To: jfw@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: the Personal Computer was the greatest thing ever invented for the
Blind

 

Hello Friends,

I have absolutely no objection to our Blind Children learning Braille, but
be realistic!

 

If I was to put one thousandth of what I have on my computer, into Braille
format, I would need at least the Empire State Building to store it!

 

Just having my Random House Webster's Unabridged Dictionary  in Braille
format would probably put me out of my computer room.

 

Some of the arguments those who use to promote Braille are just so
non-sensible that it defeats their cause.

 

For example:

"should we experience some sort of major power failure there are going to be
thousands of blind people in a world of hurt"

 

I would think we as Blind People would fair better than Sighted People if we
had a "major power failure  "

 

I use my Dymo Tape to make Braille Labels once in a while, but I would not
have those large enormous Books of Braille sitting around in my house!

 

With Best Regards,
Alan
Miami, Florida
Alan Dicey, President
United States Braille Chess Association - USBCA
"Yes, Blind or Visually Impaired People Can, and Do, Play Chess!!!"
United States Braille Chess Association Home Page:
http://AmericanBlindChess.org

----- Original Message ----- 

From: Cy Selfridge <mailto:cyselfridge@xxxxxxxxxxx>  

To: jfw@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 

Sent: Wednesday, October 20, 2010 12:39 PM

Subject: RE: the Personal Computer was the greatest thing ever invented for
the Blind

 

Tom,

My friend, I could not agree with you more on this one.

One of my concerns is that, should we experience some sort of major power
failure there are going to be thousands of blind people in a world of hurt
because they will be dead without their electronic gizmos. (LOLLOLLOL)

While managing to compose school work was a royal pain when I was in High
School and college at least I knew how to spell and punctuate.

In high school we had to learn to dissect and diagram sentences and that, my
friend, was a genuine challenge. The final test on that was the Preamble to
the Constitution. As I recall the finished product looked more like a Brillo
pad than anything else.

Cy, The Anasazi

 

 

From: jfw-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:jfw-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf
Of Tom Lange
Sent: Wednesday, October 20, 2010 10:28 AM
To: jfw@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: the Personal Computer was the greatest thing ever invented for
the Blind

 

Hi,

I've used Optacons since 1978, when I was hired by IBM as a programmer
trainee.  The Optacon was the only way that I could read my 3270 display
terminal at the time; the Talking Terminal wouldn't read the APL characters
that I used to write code.  I agree with the statement that the Optacon
really helped me to see how things are laid out both on paper and on screen,
which is a huge help.

 

While screen readers have been a godsend, I have definitely noticed a
decline in blind people's ability to spell the written word, and I blame
this on the de-emphasis on Braille in our educational system.  It appalls me
that only 10 percent of blind people in the U.S. read Braille, and, if it
were up to me, I would make Braille education mandatory, unless it could be
demonstrated that a student has a physical limitation that prevents him/her
from reading Braille.  90 percent Braille illiteracy is, to my mind, nothing
short of obscene.  You can talk about lack of manpower to properly teach it,
lack of funding, et cetera et cetera, but what that says to me is that
there's a callous disregard by the government for the literacy of blind
people in this country, and that makes me furious. Surely I can't be the
only one who feels this way.

 

Tom

 

Other related posts: