[bksvol-discuss] Re: Nobel Prize winners in Literature from 1901 was Special COllections

Hi, Roger, I think it isn't necessarily the snob appeal which might win
someone a prize. I think William Faulkner won for his experimental
writing style and how he tried to narrate the history in a pocket
universe he created, Yoknapatawpha County. Just because he may not be
your choice of reading matter, he must have appealed to some people who
really enjoyed his style of writing and telling a story. It seems to me
there are all kinds of folk who read for a variety of reasons:
personally, I read for a good story and for me this involves caring
about and identifying with the characters. I suppose other people have
different criteria. Speaking for myself, I couldn't enjoy Virginia
Woolf's To The Lighthouse because nothing really happened in the story.
Sure, you found out about the interior thoughts and feelings of the
characters, but for me, this wasn't enough to engage my interest. I
suppose there are others who are first caught by the mechanics the
author uses in telling a story and are willing to ferret out what makes
the author appeal to them. They don't have to like the characters (if
any), but they might be delighted in how the author describes the
setting or his/her word usage. I think what really struck me about
Winston Graham (I don't think he ever won the Nobel Prize) was how his
word choice, dialog, and powers of description got me to know the milieu
of his stories, his characters and the interest the author had in them
and how he was able to make me share his interest. In other words, I
like someone who can tell a story. I think readers of literature
sometimes get so caught up in whatever they're experiencing with the
author that they forget about the storytelling part which is so vital to
most readers. I suppose there may be some folks who have snobbery about
what constitutes literature with a capital L, but I wouldn't say that
all English teachers forget about the value of storytelling. I also
think that some works require the reader to have a bit more life
experience so they can be fully appreciated. I think I appreciated
Charles Dickens's works when I was older. When I was required to read
Great Expectations in Junior High, I couldn't really get into the story.
When I read him in my thirties, I was struck by how he used words in
setting a scene and how his characters acted. He was quite theatrical.
I'm certainly willing to concede there may be folks who are snobbish or
pretentious, who might read something because it is the done thing or
because they feel they ought to like something but I don't know that the
majority of people are like that. I don't even know if the
"intelligentsia" are like that. Regards, Kim Friedman.
-----Original Message-----
From: bksvol-discuss-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:bksvol-discuss-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Roger Loran
Bailey
Sent: Sunday, March 11, 2012 8:44 AM
To: bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Re: Nobel Prize winners in Literature from
1901 was Special COllections


This kind of reinforces my disdain for literary awards. They are based
on the subjective judgements of people who have gotten onto committees
by way of their connections, that is, snob societies. If you happen to
share the tastes of the members of the Nobel Committee then you will
agree with their choices. If you don't then you are likely to think that
the Nobel Committee chooses some incredibly boring authors. I would
suggest that if you want to really enjoy books, that you follow your own
interests in reading. If you want to feel superior to the reading rabble
then read the award winners and, hopefully, you will not be turned off
from reading like so many are by English teachers who assign Literature
with a capital L as the only worthwhile reading material without regard
to the students' interests.

On 3/11/2012 6:52 AM, Cindy wrote: 

At first I thought you are right; then I began to think that maybe it
was awarded for a body of work, so I went to a Nobel.org site and found
this:  so  I guess it's not one particular book.  For Sinclair Lewis I
found this: 


Sinclair Lewis

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1930 was awarded to Sinclair Lewis "for
his vigorous and graphic art of description and his ability to create,
with wit and humour, new types of characters".
for Pearl Buck I found this: 



Facts on the Nobel Prize in Literature

On 27 November 1895, Alfred Nobel signed his last will and testament,
giving the largest share of his fortune to a series of prizes, the Nobel
Prizes. As described in Nobel's will one part was dedicated to ?the
person who shall have produced in the field of literature the most
outstanding work in an ideal direction?. Learn more about the Nobel
Prize in Literature from 1901 to 2011.

That dosn't make it very clear, though; does "most outstanding work mean
one book or body of work
I checked the Nobel site for Sinclair Lewis and found this:  

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1930 was awarded to Sinclair Lewis "for
his vigorous and graphic art of description and his ability to create,
with wit and humour, new types of characters".

For Pearl Buck I found this: 


The Nobel Prize in Literature 1938 was awarded to Pearl Buck "for her
rich and truly epic descriptions of peasant life in China and for her
biographical masterpieces". , . for Pearl Buck I found this: 

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1938 was awarded to Pearl Buck "for her
rich and truly epic descriptions of peasant life in China and for her
biographical masterpieces". and for Rudyard Kipling, this:





The Nobel Prize in Literature 1907 was awarded to Rudyard Kipling "in
consideration of the power of observation, originality of imagination,
virility of ideas and remarkable talent for narration which characterize
the creations of this world-famous author".I also learned that Kipling
was the youngest author to receive the prize ( That year The Jungle Book
was mentioned whenhe won. Doris Lessing was the oldest winner, age 88 (I
think it was 2007, but now I don't remembered, even though I just read
it.

I don't hink we'd necessarily have to have all the books a prizewinner
wrote, maybe just one or a few that are representative of the author.
It's odd to hink that The Jungle Book was mentioned when Kipling won
when he wrote so many others--or maybe I'm thinking og pems, like Kim
(was that a book). I know Pearl Book wrot a lot of books about China
because I've read most of them, especially her children's book, The
Chinese Children Next Door). The award mentioned her biographies. I
didn't know she wrote biographies. Her most famous book is probably The
Great Earth, but there were sequels, too which I read--all very good.
Cindy


From: Sue Stevens  <mailto:siss52@xxxxxxxxxxxx> <siss52@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
Sent: Saturday, March 10, 2012 11:55 PM
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Re: Nobel Prize winners in Literature from
1901 was Special COllections


Wow, Cindy!  Thanks for all this info!!  
 
Sue S.
 
 
From: Cindy <mailto:popularplace@xxxxxxxxx>  
Sent: Saturday, March 10, 2012 11:28 PM
To: bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Re: Nobel Prize winners in Literature from
1901 was Special COllections
 
For those who want more information about the Nobel Prize for
Literature, here's some  general info,including a list of all winners
since 1901. If anyone wants to make a project of scanning any of the
books we don't have I'd be happy to proof them, although I don't know
how we could do non-English books unless they have been translated. I
knosw there'a at least one Sinclair Lewis book because I proofed it, and
Kipling's poetry is in,because Amy scanned that and I proofed it. I
don't know about his novels; and I'm sure, though I didn't check that
The Good Earth must be in. 
Here's the info I copied from online:  
 
All Nobel Prizes in Literature
 
The Nobel Prize in Literature has been awarded 104 times to 108 Nobel
Laureates between 1901 and 2011. All Nobel Prizes in Literature
 
The Nobel Prize in Literature has been awarded 104 times to 108 Nobel
Laureates between 1901 and 2011. 

 
Here's the list: 

 
2011
Tomas Tranströmer
2010
Mario Vargas Llosa
2009
Herta Müller
2008
Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clézio
2007
Doris Lessing
2006
Orhan Pamuk
2005
Harold Pinter
2004
Elfriede Jelinek
2003
John M. Coetzee
2002
Imre Kertész
2001
Sir Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul
2000
Gao Xingjian
1999
Günter Grass
1998
José Saramago
1997
Dario Fo
1996
Wislawa Szymborska
1995
Seamus Heaney
1994
Kenzaburo Oe
1993
Toni Morrison
1992
Derek Walcott
1991
Nadine Gordimer
1990
Octavio Paz
1989
Camilo José Cela
1988
Naguib Mahfouz
1987
Joseph Brodsky
1986
Wole Soyinka
1985
Claude Simon
1984
Jaroslav Seifert
1983
William Golding
1982
Gabriel García Márquez
1981
Elias Canetti
1980
Czeslaw Milosz
1979
Odysseus Elytis
1978
Isaac Bashevis Singer
1977
Vicente Aleixandre
1976
Saul Bellow
1975
Eugenio Montale
1974
Eyvind Johnson, Harry Martinson
1973
Patrick White
1972
Heinrich Böll
1971
Pablo Neruda
1970
Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn
1969
Samuel Beckett
1968
Yasunari Kawabata
1967
Miguel Angel Asturias
1966
Shmuel Yosef Agnon, Nelly Sachs
1965
Mikhail Aleksandrovich Sholokhov
1964
Jean-Paul Sartre
1963
Giorgos Seferis
1962
John Steinbeck
1961
Ivo Andric
1960
Saint-John Perse
1959
Salvatore Quasimodo
1958
Boris Leonidovich Pasternak
1957
Albert Camus
1956
Juan Ramón Jiménez
1955
Halldór Kiljan Laxness
1954
Ernest Miller Hemingway
1953
Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill
1952
François Mauriac
1951
Pär Fabian Lagerkvist
1950
Earl (Bertrand Arthur William) Russell
1949
William Faulkner
1948
Thomas Stearns Eliot
1947
André Paul Guillaume Gide
1946
Hermann Hesse
1945
Gabriela Mistral
1944
Johannes Vilhelm Jensen
1943
No Nobel Prize was awarded this year. The prize money was with 1/3
allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this
prize section.
1942
No Nobel Prize was awarded this year. The prize money was with 1/3
allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this
prize section.
1941
No Nobel Prize was awarded this year. The prize money was with 1/3
allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this
prize section.
1940
No Nobel Prize was awarded this year. The prize money was with 1/3
allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this
prize section.
1939
Frans Eemil Sillanpää
1938
Pearl Buck
1937
Roger Martin du Gard
1936
Eugene Gladstone O'Neill
1935
No Nobel Prize was awarded this year. The prize money was with 1/3
allocated to the Main Fund and with 2/3 to the Special Fund of this
prize section.
1934
Luigi Pirandello
1933
Ivan Alekseyevich Bunin
1932
John Galsworthy
1931
Erik Axel Karlfeldt
1930
Sinclair Lewis
1929
Thomas Mann
1928
Sigrid Undset
1927
Henri Bergson
1926
Grazia Deledda
1925
George Bernard Shaw
1924
Wladyslaw Stanislaw Reymont
1923
William Butler Yeats
1922
Jacinto Benavente
1921
Anatole France
1920
Knut Pedersen Hamsun
1919
Carl Friedrich Georg Spitteler
1918
No Nobel Prize was awarded this year. The prize money was allocated to
the Special Fund of this prize section.
1917
Karl Adolph Gjellerup, Henrik Pontoppidan
1916
Carl Gustaf Verner von Heidenstam
1915
Romain Rolland
1914
No Nobel Prize was awarded this year. The prize money was allocated to
the Special Fund of this prize section.
1913
Rabindranath Tagore
1912
Gerhart Johann Robert Hauptmann
1911
Count Maurice (Mooris) Polidore Marie Bernhard Maeterlinck
1910
Paul Johann Ludwig Heyse
1909
Selma Ottilia Lovisa Lagerlöf
1908
Rudolf Christoph Eucken
1907
Rudyard Kipling
1906
Giosuè Carducci
1905
Henryk Sienkiewicz
1904
Frédéric Mistral, José Echegaray y Eizaguirre
1903
Bjørnstjerne Martinus Bjørnson
1902
Christian Matthias Theodor Mommsen
1901
Sully Prudhomme
 
 
And here's the list of all winners since 1901


Cindy


From: Mayrie ReNae  <mailto:mayrierenae@xxxxxxxxx>
<mayrierenae@xxxxxxxxx>
To: bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
Sent: Saturday, March 10, 2012 6:57 PM
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Re: Special Collections

 
Hi Sue, 
 
Is Pulitzer Prize the same thing but by a different name? 
 
If so, you can find the list of books here: 
 
http://www.bookshare.org/browse/collection/31/Pulitzer%20Prize%20Award%2
0Winners 
 
Hope that was what you're looking for! 
 
Mayrie 
 
 
 
From: bksvol-discuss-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:bksvol-discuss-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Sue Stevens
Sent: Saturday, March 10, 2012 6:35 PM
To: bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Special Collections


    Hi All,
 
In checking the special collections I do not see the Nobel Literature
prizewinners listed.  Am I just missing them, or do we not have them?
 
Sue S.
 



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