[opendtv] Re: its a wifi world - Re: Re: Twang's

Now let's look at this in a more rational way.

If we look at this from the perspective of a network of networks, the 
consumer will use a variety of services to capture digital bits and 
to handle two-way transactional services. From this perspective, WiFi 
could be the PERFECT back channel for digital broadcast services.

The problem is not that one infrastructure will obsolete another. The 
problem is using the infrastructure in a complementary manner so as 
to facilitate the goal of providing the services people want, 
anywhere, anytime.

That can't happen until the entrenched services, protected by 
political franchises and legislation, are forced to compete in an 
open marketplace.

Regards
Craig


At 6:33 PM -0400 4/27/04, Manfredi, Albert E wrote:
>Venki S. Iyer wrote:
>
>>  From a service provider perspective,
>>  if I am installing meshed wifi APs in each customer home,
>>  what's to stop me
>>  from using some protion of the available bandwidth
>>  for multicast ("broadcast") purposes? Sure, I'd need the
>>  right legalese
>>  within my customer contracts, etc, but that's all (apart
>>  from actually getting content to re-broadcast).
>
>Speaking only about technical issues, not legal ones, I'd
>say no problem. As an ISP, go for it.
>
>But this in no way competes with DTT broadcast delivery.
>It's a separate matter. If anyone expects DTT delivery to
>depend on 802.11 instead of the allocated DTV spectrum,
>then these people are:
>
>(a) using WLANs to provide continuous coverage of the
>same material, which would defeat one of the *key*
>features of 802.11 (frequency reuse), and/or
>
>(b) dedicating all of the WLAN bandwidth to TV delivery
>and potentially still unable to transmit all of the
>market's OTA stations.
>
>Eventually we'll have 100 Mb/s 802.11, which could do a
>reasonable job of providing local broadcasts of DTV in
>many smaller markets. But to compete with ATSC delivery,
>you'd need an awful lot of these WLANs, which will
>*therefore* render their intended mission unachievable.
>There are barely enough frequencies available to provide
>continuous coverage, at least in the 2.4 GHz band of
>802.11b and g, and these will be taken up with DTV
>broadcasts. And range restrictions only get more acute
>as you bump up the bit rate to accommodate the DTT
>stations in a market.
>
>So it is disturbing to me to see people in leadership
>positions throw out these red herrings. It just spins up
>the uninformed and defocuses those who need to remain
>focused. If TV is such a spectrum hog, as lots of people
>complain about, then why would anyone assume that by
>moving TV to a different transmission protocol, the
>spectrum issue would disappear? It's a bit like
>proposing that perpetual motion machine to solve the
>energy crisis.
>
>Bert
>
>
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