[opendtv] Re: its a wifi world - Re: Re: Twang's


Um, Kon, you need to take a look at the mesh activities going on around
wifi. From a service provider perspective,
if I am installing meshed wifi APs in each customer home, what's to stop me
from using some protion of the available bandwidth
for multicast ("broadcast") purposes? Sure, I'd need the right legalese
within my customer contracts, etc, but that's all (apart
from actually getting content to re-broadcast).

The UDP/TCP issue is a dead herring - there's probably 1/2 dozen ways of
getting around TCP's greedy behavior.

Meshed environments and associating applications with virtual IP addresses
rather than the IP of a physical interface let you roam
across APs without TCP connections being dropped.

Meshed environments allow you to extend the "service radius" of a wifi in a
symmetric manner (OK, symmetric if it is a full mesh,
not just a mesh between the infrastructure elements - APs, in this case).

Finally, however, Craig probably was "stealing service" by using his
neighbor's WiFi.

Cheers,

-Venki


    -----Original Message-----
    From: opendtv-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
    [mailto:opendtv-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx]On Behalf Of Kon
    Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2004 1:26 AM
    To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
    Subject: [opendtv] its a wifi world - Re: Re: Twang's


    Did you get permission to use that WiFi link from the house next door?
    If not, you're breaking privacy laws, and they could sue you. You fall
    into the same category as a hacker.

    See, this is one of the small sticking points that none of the 'WiFi
    can be used for broadcast' clowns latch on to.

    What defines that WiFi is not relevant for broadcast is:
    1. WiFi access points are *private*. Its not a free for all.
    2. WiFi access points are unicast. Nearly all vendor AP hardware is
    configured to squelch UDP traffic in favor of TCP traffic of any sort.
    3. There is no TV on the internet.
    4. You cannot roam transparently without service interruption between
    APs.
    5. IF you increase the service radius of a wifi network, your clients
    won't be able to connect back to it if they are out of their own
    operating range.

    The model is about as different from a television broadcast station
    model as you can get. Just because they both use RF doesn't make them
    equal in any way. But then again when I listen to some of the people
    spouting nonsense when comparing the two, its easy to conclude that
    they don't know what the heck they are talking about anyway.

    Just because someone broadcasts their SSID, doesn't give you any rights
    at all to use their link - even to the point of just grabbing a DHCP IP
    address.

    WiFi APs might be littered all over the place, but almost all of those
    are not for free public use. So its a moot point, really.

    So my response to Powell's comment would be - what are you smoking, and
    where can I get some of that?

    BTW In a keynote speech at the PBS Tech Conference, APTS suggested we
    change the name 'DTV' to 'WiFiTV', since WiFi is the 'in thing'. How
    does one even begin to address such a comment? Mind boggling.

    Cheers
    Kon

    > During his breakfast chat with Sam Donaldson, Chariman Powell asked
    > broadcasters to consider what might happen if there are pervasive
    > WiFi networks that equal the coverage of DTV.  Every time I woke up
    > my notebook in Las Vegas it saw one or more WiFi networks. We stayed
    > in a house about twenty minutes from the Convention Center. The house
    > had a DSL modem, but we has some problems with it assigning DHCP
    > addresses. Fortunately, when I arrived I was able to use a WiFi link
    > from a neighboring house. The next day we bought a 802.11b WiFi link
    > with 4 port router at Fryes - net cost $19.95 after rebate.



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