[access-uk] Re: Web access: we could be a force (was: Re: Sainsbury's)

George,

This is really excellent advice. I'd also add that if you know there is a solution to the problem you're outlining, then giving this to the person you're contacting is a good idea too.

Again, you need to pitch it gently, especially if you're talking to a non-techie, but offering to be part of the solution, as well as the bringer of bad news, all helps to sweeten the pill.

Tink.
----- Original Message ----- From: <access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Thursday, January 27, 2005 11:07 AM
Subject: [access-uk] Re: Web access: we could be a force (was: Re: Sainsbury's)



Can I suggest a few pointers that might help here.

First, it is very important to stress that you wish to spend
money with the company whose web site you are criticising.
No need to rub their noses in it, but Sainsbury's won't like
the idea that a group of you will spend your money at a
competitor's site.

Second, if you report an issue here, please state two
things.  1) The URL of the web site. 2) An e-mail address
where complaints can be sent.

Third, if possible, give the name of an individual to whom
you may have spoken or communicated with.  Remember that
some organisations have dozens of people in support roles.
If complaints are targeted at one person, rather than a
dozen different people, that one person ends up having more
clout.

Fourth, try to give simplified examples of your problem and
don't use screen reader jargon.  Comments like, "I can't
even find XYZ button with my JAWS cursor" will usually mean
nothing to the sighted guy receiving your complaint.
Whereas, "I am unable to use a mouse, and there does not
appear to be any keyboard method of pressing the Add to my
shopping trolley button."

George.

-----Original Message-----
From: access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Damon Rose
Sent: 27 January 2005 09:46
To: access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [access-uk] Re: Web access: we could be a force
(was: Re: Sainsbury's)

No Colin I think you misunderstood Leoni.

Like me she works on web development and usability a lot.

She talks to people about making their sites accessible.
They ask for written down guidelines.  They want
resources.
But at the end of the day, if they don't see visually
impaired users in action, it's an entirely abstract
concept.
To them, they have to do all this annoying work. OK so
lots
of them do it because they agree with the idea of equality

but others feel they're doing it to stay on the right side
of
the law.

They may play around with a screenreader even, usually
getting very little understanding for obvious reasons, but

they don't have human contact with disabled people.  The
other fallout here is that they don't see the benefit of
their work nor the passion, distress and frustration.

...Damon



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