RE: Oracle recovery

Well, I'll drop my 2 cents into the fray.  As a DBA, when a database =
failure occurs I want to be able to recover the application/database as =
applicable to the point in time that "all hell broke loose".  Personally =
I don't really care about the "Business needs" as they change faster =
than most runway models.  More importantly, given that there is a stated =
business requirement and action plan when the application fails for a =
database error those in power will not be reading the action plan, but =
reacting to pressures from higher up who never signed off on that action =
plan in the first place.  Therefore, DBA beware.  Failures are =
inevitable, it's just a matter of when, how bad, and how much "help" =
you'll have breathing down your neck!!

Dick Goulet
Senior Oracle DBA
Oracle Certified 8i DBA

-----Original Message-----
From: Daniel Fink [mailto:Daniel.Fink@xxxxxxx]
Sent: Monday, May 03, 2004 3:42 PM
To: oracle-l@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: Oracle recovery


I recall a paper from Oracle (about 5 years ago) that analyzed
the various outages, the methods of recovery and how long they
took. I have it at home and I'll see if I can get a doc_id from
it.

The point I would make with the DBA is that exports are not a
recovery mechanism, they are only able to restore to a given
point (time of the export) and they do not restore everything
(sys objects). With an export, there is no way to roll-forward.
Of course, a cold backup w/out archive logs is also unable to
roll-forward. All data from the last export and the current time
is lost period end of story. Is this acceptable? Perhaps. In
certain environments where data loss is not a problem, exports
are a pretty simple way of capturing a snapshot of the data. It
is also not just 'data' that is lost. It is anything stored
inside the db, including procedures, packages, etc. In a
development environment, a days worth of coding could easily run
into the 10s of 1000s of dollars.

Daniel


"M.Godlewski" wrote:
>=20
> Believe it or not the database I'm currently using the DBA is forcing =
us to use exports as our applications recovery scenario.  I'm trying to =
locate information about archive logging and the tablespace point in =
time recovery versus full database recovery.  I wanted to find some kind =
of percentages about the number of databases that need full database =
recovery (ie applying all archive logs) and percentages of databases =
that only needed TSPIR.
>=20
> I thinking if I can get some type of failure rate it could help sway =
him into using archive log mode which would give us better recovery =
options.
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