[argyllcms] Re: Monitor calibration

On Wednesday 24 March 2010 01:55:53 am Steffen wrote:
> Am 24.03.2010 08:43, schrieb Pascal de Bruijn:
> > On Wed, Mar 24, 2010 at 1:04 AM, Steffen <mail@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
> >> There are indeed monitors with unequal RGB gain values from factory,
> >> like the Eizo S2433. Whatever works best, I suppose.
> >>
> >> And there is a distinct advantage when working with the gain controls on
> >> the monitor to achieve a starting point as close to the target as
> >> possible. Most of the higher grade monitors have a 10 bit deep LUT. That
> >> means, that unlike the 8 bit available through ordinary LUTs for the
> >> software correction on the graphics card, changing values in the display
> >> won't "throw away" as much information as a correction on the software
> >> side would. I hope this is what the discussion was about, if not, I
> >> apologize for my lazy reading habits ;-).
> >
> > Higher grade being 1000EUR+ :) ??
> >
> > Anyway correcting in two places in theory degrades more, no matter how
> > many bit the LUTs are...
> >
> > Regards,
> > Pascal de Bruijn
> 
> No, most PVA or IPS displays feature a LUT that is 10 bit deep. Only
> most TN panels don't. So you don't have to sacrifice all your money in
> order to get some bang for the buck. I wouldn't be surprised if the HP
> LP2475w and the Dell U2410 also had such features.
> 
> And in general terms, I would agree with your assessment. But not
> necessarily this time: if you calibrate based solely on software
> correction, especially if the deviation from the target is big, your
> results WILL definatelly be worse. Because if you correct in hardware
> first, 10 bits result in 1024 steps, compared to the 256 available steps
> at 8 bit. So, you have more room to operate in without touching the last
> 8 bit your graphics card will send to your display.
> 
> I think this is definatelly preferable.
> 


Also some very high end monitors have 12 bit internal LUTs.  So for these 
monitors the advantages of using the internal LUTs is even bigger.

Hal

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