[projectaon] Re: Freeway/Highway/interstate usage

I would like to point out an important detail about the US Interstate system -- 
Interstate freeways always are one or two digit numbers, while state highways 
are three digit numbers - so the "Highway 820" usage is correct here. I agree 
about changing "Freeway 20" and "Freewaw 35" to "Interstate 20" and "Interstate 
35", as it just flows better, IMO.

Nicholas Matzen

>>> HIGHWAY HOLOCAUST
>>> 
>>> <http://www.projectaon.org/test/en/xhtml-less-simple/fw/01hh/title.htm>
>>> 
>>> (er)        17, 36, 61, 86, 93, 136, 178, 182, 196, 321, 327:       Freeway 
>>> 20 -> 
>>> Interstate 20
>>> (er)        22, 29, 105 [x3], 144, 160 [x3], 211, 315:      Freeway 35 -> 
>>> Interstate 35
>>> (er)        22 [x3], 224:   Highway 820 -> Interstate 820
>>> (er)        22:     Freeway 20, the interstate highway -> Interstate 
>>> Freeway 20, 
>>> the highway
>>> [bk: Also, I hate to open another can of worms, but I was going back through
>>> the series, and the author's inconsistent in how he refers to Interstate
>>> highways in the first 2 books but quite consistent in the last 2 books.
>>> Specifically, an Interstate should never just be referred to as "Freeway X".
>>> "Interstate X" is preferred, "Interstate Freeway X" is acceptable, but
>>> "Freeway X" when referring to an Interstate is just wrong.]
>> 
>> This is a tough issue because while these roads are officially
>> designated "Interstate XXX", I'm used to people referring to the roads
>> in my area colloquially like "the freeway", "Highway XXX", "the XXX",
>> or "I-XXX". I'm not used to them referring to them as "Freeway XXX",
>> but was this done because British readers would be confused by
>> "Interstate XXX"? (Like I was by "gaoler"?!)
> 
> ** As Ben points out, the usage is both non-standard and inconsistent. 
> Although I'm British-speaking, I would agree with making this change. 
> "Interstate" isn't really any different to "freeway" inasmuch as I use 
> neither of them. ;-) It is clear from the context what Interstate is 
> referring to, anyway, so there should be no confusion.

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