RE: Java accessibility

Susan,
Great; I will be interested in your thoughts. As I sated, the java access is 
still a work in progress; so, you may get a response of "that's on my list of 
todos" but I am still interested in what you have to say about it. There are 2 
sample java applications that come packaged with the WE4Java tool. They are the 
demo Java Notepad program and the demo Java swingSet2 program. The notepad 
program is just to let you play with some simple text editing using a java 
application. The SwingSet2 demo is used for showing a major number of the 
different types of screen components that might be found in a java application 
such as buttons, check boxes, radio buttons, lists, sliders, popup dialogs, 
tables, trees, and more. Much of the java development work has been done using 
this swing demo from sun as a benchmark. 


-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Stanzel, Susan - 
Kansas City, MO
Sent: Friday, May 01, 2009 6:27 AM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: Java accessibility

Hi Jay,

I am excited about yo speaking at the NFBCS. I have asked to have Windoweyes 
installed on my computer. 

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Lloyd Rasmussen
Sent: Thursday, April 30, 2009 6:28 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: Java accessibility

I will see you at the NFBCS meeting.  

I recently installed your script for Java, and can indeed read the Java Control 
Panel in Window-Eyes.  But this leads to a question.

I was looking at running processes on my PC at work (and found this at home 
also), and discovered a recently added program, jqs.exe, Java Quick Start.
Some info on an internet forum indicated that this is a program which 
pre-fetches many Java components in versions of Windows before Vista, so that 
when it is needed, Java will load faster.  Is there any way to disable this 
program, to prevent some disk thrashing, with or without use of the Java 
Control Panel?  I think this pre-fetch mechanism was incorporated into the Java 
runtimes some time last year.

Lloyd Rasmussen, W3IUU, Kensington, Maryland
Home:  http://lras.home.sprynet.com
Work:  http://www.loc.gov/nls
 

> -----Original Message-----
> From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:programmingblind- 
> bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Macarty, Jay {PBSG}
> Sent: Wednesday, April 29, 2009 10:04 AM
> To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: RE: Java accessibility
> 
> Susie,
> 
> As Sina indicates, I have written the current Window-Eyes access for
Java.
> It is still a work-in-progress but is coming along. In fact, I will be 
> speaking at the NFB convention this July to the Computer Science group 
> regarding my work on Window-Eyes Java accessibility.
> 
> One thing to note is that a primary difference between the Jaws Java 
> access and the Window-Eyes java access is that the Jaws java access
has a
> dependency on the Java Access Bridge while the Window-Eyes solution
does
> not. The java swing API contains an extremely powerful accessibility 
> framework. The Java Access Bridge makes use of this framework but it
isn't
> the only mechanism for accessing it. When I first released some of the 
> early beta copies of the window-Eyes java access tool, I had a long 
> conversation with Peter Korn from Sun regarding the architecture of
the
> WE4Java support and how it works. He was in agreement with the
approach.
> 

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