[bksvol-discuss] Re: OT: Congrats,Smoke-free Julie--

Uh, yeah, well, that is one time when I couldn't smoke. Hmm. I guess I'll 
have to start getting busy. Happy validating, everyone! *grin* Take care.
Julie Morales, 1 day smoke-free!
inlovewithchrist@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Windows/MSN Messenger (but not email):
mercy0421@xxxxxxxxxxx
Skype: mercy0421
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Pratik Patel" <pratikp1@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Wednesday, July 13, 2005 9:31 PM
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Re: OT: Congrats,Smoke-free Julie--


Julie,

How about when you're scanning for Bookshare?  If not, I suggest you start
cranking those books out. (smile!)

Prat



Pratik Patel
Interim Director
Office of Special Services
Queens College
Director
CUNY Assistive Technology Services
The City University of New York
     ppatel@xxxxxx

-----Original Message-----
From: bksvol-discuss-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:bksvol-discuss-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Julie Morales
Sent: Thursday, July 14, 2005 12:20 AM
To: bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Re: OT: Congrats,Smoke-free Julie--

Hi, Cindy, and thanks for noticing! *smile* I quit for six weeks when my
grandfather was diagnosed with cancer two years ago. My mother and
stepfather, who both smoke, came to visit...and that was my undoing, but I'm

hoping to kick it for good this time. I quit cold turkey back then. I've
tried to do that again since but can't seem to do it this time. I've tried
several times since then. Now, I'm using the patch. Yes, I know there is a
psychological addiction to nicotine, for sure, and I think that's what I'm
suffering from now more than the physical cravings. When I quit cold turkey,

I'd be tired, really jumpy, just really irritated and itching to do
something...anything, like I had so much pent up energy that I'd blow at any

given minute. I was wound up like a top. It's not that way now with the
patch. I'm not tired and can usually keep my focus. Not keeping my hands
busy is a problem, though, and I know that's definitely the psychological
aspect of it. It's hard to find things I can do that, if I did still smoke,
I couldn't do. I can smoke while I read. I can smoke while I'm on the
computer. I can smoke on walks. The only thing I can think of that I can't
do while smoking is swimming, and our pool closes at 9, so I can't be in the

pool 24/7. *grin* Anyway, thanks again for noticing. Take care.
Julie Morales, 1 day smoke-free!
inlovewithchrist@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Windows/MSN Messenger (but not email):
mercy0421@xxxxxxxxxxx
Skype: mercy0421
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Cindy" <popularplace@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Wednesday, July 13, 2005 9:09 PM
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] OT: Congrats,Smoke-free Julie--


Congratulations, Julie, and keep it up. I know how
hard it is to give up smoking.  I gave it up the day I
got married -- it was part of a bargain with my
husband-- and for years, literally, I would dream of
sneaking smokes. I missed it most after meals, and
during work breaks. When watching television,I either
ate popcorn (not as fattening as chips, though I
occasionally ate those, too) and did various kinds of
needlework (in those days one didn't have to watch tv
as carefully as one does now) to keep my hands busy.
Now I still have to keep my hands busy, either by
ironing or rolling metal ball to keep my hands limber.

So keep at it. It stays hard for a wall, but
eventually gets easier. Are you doing it cold turkey
or using a patch or some such thing? My personal
opinion, despite what some experts may say, is that
smoking is a psychological addiction, not a physical
one. I didn't have any physical withdrawal
symptoms--not like headaches when I stopped drinking
coffee.

Cindy



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