RE: Oracle vs. Google (was Why isn't Open Office on Windows Accessible?)

Jamal, I'd ask Oracle if I were you, *smile* ... They have a licensing page on 
java I believe.

I don't want to give you misinformation.
 
Take care,
Sina

-----Original Message-----
From: Jamal Mazrui [mailto:empower@xxxxxxxxx] 
Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2010 5:34 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Cc: Sina Bahram; 'Alex Hall'
Subject: Re: Oracle vs. Google (was Why isn't Open Office on Windows 
Accessible?)

So, there are other licensing terms besides GPL3 and Apache2?  This puzzles me 
because I thought those licenses (on Java and
Android,
respectively) are supposed to be comprehensive in nature.  It seems 
antithetical to the GPL for it to apply only partially.  I am
not disputing what you said, just trying to get a better handle on this. 
What aspects of Java are GPL3 and what are not?

Jamal


On 8/19/2010 11:38 AM, Sina Bahram wrote:
> Schwartz actually shopped Sun around, quite specifically to Elison, 
> with the incentive of a rather large IP suit against Google as considerably 
> sweetening the deal. That's at least according to
industry insiders.
>
> Now, in regards to the suit, I'd refer you to some of the licensing 
> surrounding j2me and how there are certain requirements of byte/feature 
> compliance, none of which Google translational layer
dependant pseudo JVM has.
>
> The classpath exception to the GPL v2, while sort of relevant, really 
> has nothing to do with this case. It might come up in discussions, but that's 
> not what the law suit based on the seven patents is
about.
>
> Take care,
> Sina
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
> [mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Jamal 
> Mazrui
> Sent: Thursday, August 19, 2010 9:23 AM
> To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Cc: Alex Hall
> Subject: Re: Oracle vs. Google (was Why isn't Open Office on Windows 
> Accessible?)
>
> Can anyone help clarify the basis of the suit?  I thought Java is 
> licensed with GPL3 and the classpath exception, and Android is 
> licensed with Apache2, which is GPL compatible.  I am surprised that Oracle 
> would have any legitimate case.  Generally, it is not
in a company's interest to engage in a prominent lawsuit without a plausible 
expectation of victory.
>
> Jamal
>
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