Re: About lisp

lol, "very very interesting" as the little German guy on laugh in used to say!


inthane
----- Original Message ----- From: "tribble" <lauraeaves@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Friday, February 29, 2008 10:23 AM
Subject: Re: About lisp


LOL -- well maybe you can salivate over the MUMPS programs you write -- hmm
I agree this is a funny name, but in a way still kind of catchy. At least
you remember the name if nothing else.

When I was working there was a department in research that was trying to
write an integrated programming environment for C (actually in competition
to what I was working on, but as I said that one got cancelled soon after it
was slated for product) -- anyway, the research environment had a c
interpreter called CIN and a gui environment named VICE -- so CIN and Vice
won out over our environment which we called IPE... Anyway, people liked the acronyms CIN and VICE, which was all part of a global effort they called SDI
(for "software development initiative" -- note the similarity to Stretegic
Defense Initiative begun by President Reagan.  Also part of the SDI was a
browsing database they called CIA for C Information Abstractor.
Interesting names they chose -- I could tell you more but these I thought
were novel.
Happy hacking.
--le


----- Original Message ----- From: "Chris Hallsworth" <christopherhallsworth71@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2008 4:34 PM
Subject: Re: About lisp


Can I just throw in a bit of humour here? I know I don't respond much on
this list, but how can anyone imagine a programming language with the
acronym resembling a highly contagious viral disease of the salivary
glands? Hmmm!

Bob J. wrote:
Inthane,

MUMPS (as I know it) is an interpreted language that runs on what might
still be referred to as a "main frame" system.  I know of no compiler to
generate a stand-alone executable file from MUMPS code that could be run
in
the Microsoft Windows environment.

If anybody knows of one, I would be interested in hearing about it.

Bob


----- Original Message ----- From: "inthaneelf" <inthaneelf@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2008 11:46 AM
Subject: Re: About lisp


bob,

since your familiar with it, would it be useful still to new programmers
and
do you think it is a "stand the test of time" language?

if you feel it is, would you be willing to do a fruit basket demo in it so
I
can put it up on the fbd site for reference?

if you wish to, there is a downloadable file with the criteria for the
demo
project on the site at:
http://fruitbasketdemo.alacorncomputer.com

thanks,
inthane
. For Blind Programming assistance, Information, Useful Programs, and
Links
to Jamal Mazrui's Text tutorial packages and Applications, visit me at:
http://grabbag.alacorncomputer.com
. to be able to view a simple programming project in several programming
languages, visit the Fruit basket demo site at:
http://fruitbasketdemo.alacorncomputer.com
----- Original Message ----- From: "Bob J." <rjustice004@xxxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2008 10:47 AM
Subject: Re: About lisp


Last I heard, MUMPS is still alive and well although they now prefer to
call
it "M Technology."  I retired as a MUMPS programmer about 17 months ago
from
the U. S. Department of Veterans Affairs.  The curious may find info
about
this ANSI language at
www.hardhats.org

Bob


----- Original Message ----- From: "Adrian Beech" <a.beech@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2008 5:03 AM
Subject: RE: About lisp


Yikes, Snobol... never thought I'd see that one mentioned again!  To add
to
the trip down memory lane how about PL/1, ADA, Mumps, Simula64, BCPL,
Prolog
and and for good measure Modula-2.

Sigh, the glory days of C... when real programmers didn't eat quiche :)

Cheers.
AB

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of tribble
Sent: Thursday, 28 February 2008 8:26 AM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: About lisp

Yes, I think you are right -- there are a lot of general purpose
languages
out there lately.  That is curious.  It used to be languages were
application specific -- fortran (formula translation) for engineers,
snobol
for string and list processing, a few functional languages for highly
specialized recursive apps, apl for obfuscated math (sorry, apl read
right
to left and was painfully terse and tool a while getting used to), cobol
for

people who wanted to program database apps in english *smile*, web
programming or markup languages for the net when it emerged, and dozens
more -- when I was working they had application oriented languages (which
they called AOL's) for use on the phone system software,  I think with
the
explosion of AOL's there was a desire to write a general purpose language
that could do everything.  Then smalltalk and eiffel and c++ et al came
along and then java and c#, and extensions to vb and perl/php to do
OO-like
designs, and python and ruby and whatever else...
My fingers are getting tired *smile*
So there is many to one and one to many and this keeps hoards of
programmers

employed as they try to grab the coolest features for their
projects...*smile*
I think it's interesting that python is indentation sensitive.  Sounds
like
a pain for blind programmers that don't look at indentation, but I also
think it is a plus for those same programmers as it makes for code that
can
be shared with sighted programmers.
Anyway, happy hacking!
--le

----- Original Message ----- From: "Chris Hofstader" <chris.hofstader@xxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2008 7:10 AM
Subject: RE: About lisp


Hi,

I always thought of that other editor as: type vi at the command prompt
and
very little will change.

The one thing that I'm a bit curious about these days is why the sudden
explosion of new languages?  For the longest time, a platform had its
primary language, UNIX, GNU/Linux and DOS used C, Macintosh had some
dialect
of Pascal and AppleEvents, mainframes had Fortran and COBOL, VMS had
PL/I.
There were also a lot of narrowly focused languages like Lisp for AI
work,
DB2 for databases, JCL for making your mainframe happy, etc.

In the last few years, though, I see an increasingly large number of
general
purpose languages arriving on the scene (Ruby, Python, Lua, C#, J#, Java
and
a bunch more) and I can't entirely understand why so many people are
investing so much time and money in programming languages.

cdh

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of tribble
Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2008 6:38 AM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: About lisp

Hey Chris -- I never heard that historical vignette about emacs -- thanks
for the flashback! I remember that time period but at the time I was
using
"that other editor", vi, but emacs definitely was a major presence. It's
funny but it is easy to lapse into nostalgia over cool projects that we
were

working on back then, especially if the software got popular and used by
a
lot of people, but in the corporate world with management shooting down
projects like ducks, they used to tell people not to get emotionally
attached to projects, which a lot of people did, both guys and gals, so
the
dynamics were crazy -- but my response to the recommendation not to get
attached to a project was that after picking bits for 60 hours a week for
months or years on a piece of software, and seeing it trashed, it really
wasn't possible to dissociate from a project totally -- you needed to
like
the project in order to put that much effort into it, but projects came
and
went so fast you soon learned to be mercenary.
I think the 80s and 90s were pivotal in computer science though, so small
bit-picking projects such as DOS for example (not that I ever worked on
DOS)

exploded into phenomena like Microsoft and windows that took over the
world,

and the stuff we all did on C++ back in the 80s and 90s also was pivotal,
and when it started getting popular everyone was trying to jump onto it.
I
suppose times are similar now, but not so much as in the 80s and 90s -- for all those currently working in the industry, is that true? My impression
is

that projects are smaller and more numerous and come and go more quickly.
Happy hacking all!
--le

----- Original Message ----- From: "Chris Hofstader" <chris.hofstader@xxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2008 6:03 AM
Subject: RE: About lisp


Of course, you are correct I wasn't referring to a GUI for programming in
Lisp as, back in those days, emacs was the Lisp programming environment
for
Lisp hacking and virtually all of those guys agreed upon it as the best
solution.  Goz wrote the first emacs in some strange system that was
difficult and even more difficult to modify.  Stallman and the others
agreed
that Lisp was the perfect language for making editors and other tools
like
them and thus was born the emacs we all know and love. When Goz went off
to
commercialize all of the cool system tools made around the AI lab in
those
days, he took the Lisp version and called it UniPress emacs.  Stallman
and
the others founding Project GNU gave distributed the Lisp based one as
GNU
emacs.

Getting all nostalgic again: back in those years UniPress ran a monthly
full
page advert in UNIX World with a whole bunch of heads in shadow on a grey
background with quotes on why they preferred Gosmacs.  At FSF, we took a
bit
of our fundraising budget and got photos of a big chunk of the computer
science pantheon (including Minsky, McCarthy, Guy Steele, Hal Abelson,
Gerry
Sussman, Rodney Brooks, Patrick Winston, Knuth, Bob Boyer and others whom
I
cannot think of with my caffeine mg to hour ratio so dangerously low)
and,
arranged exactly like their ad but with the text, "GNU Emacs Users Aren't
Afraid to Show Our Faces," and, under each giant of the field a quote
praising both emacs and another extolling project GNU or the concept of
free
software.

We believe we won the day when Unipress had a totally different ad the
following month saying something about how one can never know what they
may
get if they use a program that includes the source. We fired back with a
one luminary per month advertisement series saying exactly why the GNU
versions were more stable, more secure and, of course, you don't have to
wait for some programmers in New Jersey to fix bugs because you already
have
the source and can do it yourself.  In those years, the proportion of
people
who read UNIX World who were also programmers of some sort was pretty
huge.

Sina, I know you aren't fond of emacs but, keep in mind, this debate was
going on about a decade before you were born and anything that even
approached a integrated development environment was radically cool. Over
that decade, we added so much like full integration with lots of
languages,
gdb and so many other cool things that people take entirely for granted
these days. It was a real exciting time to be around the lab, around GNU and, if one had an interest in programming tools, I doubt any other point
in
space time (except maybe at Parc Place when Adele was in charge) could
even
give the slightest indication of what it felt like.  Knowing you as well
as
I do, I think you would have felt as though you had stumbled into Xanadu
if,
at 21 years old, you were like many of the other guys your age who made
that
stuff happen in the lab back then.

I'll go start the history/mid-life crisis list later today.

Enjoy,
cdh

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Sina Bahram
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2008 11:24 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: About lisp

It's interesting that you mentioned a novel windowing system and not a
graphics interface for programmers. *smile*, two quite separate things.
One
deals in abstract terms involving stacks, queues, overlays, priority
scheduling, possibly coordinate management, and so on. The other deals
with
setting the background color to red, defining buttons inside of classes
for
windows, and generally very dirty looking code. The former can be quite
beautiful, and still is, in lisp, the latter is hardly beautiful in any
language, especially in lisp.

Take care,
Sina

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Chris
Hofstader
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2008 10:55 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: About lisp

The first known windowing system was written by Richard Greenblatt in
Lisp
at MIT when he was still a student.  He would later go onto Director of
AI
and then form LMI (Lisp Machines Incorporated) which would be at the
center
of the controversy that would pit Greenblatt/Stallman and the free
software
people (Hal, Jerry, Rod, etc.) against those who would form Symbolics and
the other proprietary source companies that just took the work from the
AI
Lab and commercialized it.

No one really remembers Symbolics or Goz and that crowd nor does anyone
remember LMI. Greenblatt's Sleazy Windowing System, however, has a solid place in history. Unfortunately, Greenblatt and his crew had to invent a
new computer designed specifically to run Lisp and the windowing system
as
nothing on the market had either the horsepower or the kinds of processor
instructions needed to run Lisp with any efficiency back then.

cdh

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Ken Perry
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2008 8:55 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: About lisp



I want to agree with Sina here if your going to write Lisp write lisp
don't
try to shove GUI into it cause that just spells guilisp and unless you
have
the flew you don't need that.

Ken

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Sina Bahram
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2008 5:37 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: About lisp

Ken did a great job with that one, and he realized a great deal of the
headache that goes into lisp and GUI programming, but I will say that it
is
a horrible example of lisp. This has nothing at all to do with Ken's
code,
which is great. It's just that the lisp fruit basket is not
representative
of the really powerful phrasings of most problems that can exist in lisp,
and instead it ends up being multi-line calls of special parameters to
functions to design a win32 dialog.

Take care,
Sina

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of inthaneelf
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2008 8:23 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: About lisp

I believe I have some info on lisp in the definitions file for the fruit
basket demo version in that language, either that or I got some info from
one of the computer dictionaries on a search from it, both of which have
links on the fruit basket home page.

HTH,
Inthane
. For Blind Programming assistance, Information, Useful Programs, and
Links
to Jamal Mazrui's Text tutorial packages and Applications, visit me at:
http://grabbag.alacorncomputer.com
. to be able to view a simple programming project in several programming
languages, visit the Fruit basket demo site at:
http://fruitbasketdemo.alacorncomputer.com

----- Original Message -----
From: "tribble" <lauraeaves@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2008 6:20 AM
Subject: Re: About lisp


Re: apl
I wonder if it was just one of those academic languages there only for
the purpose of teaching a comparative language class...  Which leads
me to the
following: Did anyone ever program in a language called icon?  It was
popular when I got my masters, but I haven't heard of it lately...
--le

----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris Hofstader" <chris.hofstader@xxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Monday, February 25, 2008 6:05 AM
Subject: RE: About lisp


I never even met someone who programmed in APL.  My brother made his
living in SmallTalk and all of its graphicality for a while but now
he's working for Microsoft and, I'd assume, he works using their
languages.

cdh

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Sina
Bahram
Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2008 8:41 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: About lisp

APL is such an amazingly cool sounding language ... I really tried to
get into it a while back, but it's not easy to program in a graphical
programming language, *grin*

Take care,
Sina

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of tribble
Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2008 3:15 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: About lisp

ah yes, snobol -- loved that language -- memories -- the runtime
environment we used to run snobol was called spitbol (kind of weird)
-- did you ever write anything in apl? That was a fun one also that
stretched the mind a bit.  I don't know about current use of lisp.
--le


----- Original Message -----
From: "Macarty, Jay {PBSG}" <Jay.Macarty@xxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Friday, February 22, 2008 6:01 PM
Subject: About lisp


Sina,
Way back in the day, I took a course on languages which covered about
8 different ones in a single course. Probably the most obscure of
these was snobol for which a class mate and I wrote an interpreter. I
recall studying lisp but was wondering what it is generally used for
these days and if a free command line compiler is available?

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Sina
Bahram
Sent: Friday, February 22, 2008 9:03 AM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: what is Hex?

You're absolutely correct my friend. Needless to say I feel extremely
bad about this. Sorry!

I sat down and wrote out -127 in twos complement and realized I can
also represent -128.

Obviously this applies to 32 bit representations and so on, as well.

Sorry again ... It appears that programming in lisp and java have
dulled my senses.

Take care,
Sina

________________________________

From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Nirandas
Sent: Friday, February 22, 2008 12:02 AM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: what is Hex?


Hi Sina,
As I understand, a byte can contain 256 unique values. So a signed
byte's maximum and minimum range should be -128 to 127 not
-127 to 127.


Nirandas

----- Original Message -----
From: Sina Bahram <mailto:sbahram@xxxxxxxxx>
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Sent: Friday, February 22, 2008 9:50 AM
Subject: RE: what is Hex?


Again, I'm sorry for the disagreement, but there are several flaws in
this explanation. I've attempted to correct them below.

The standard byte's signed values are -127 to 127, not -128 to 127 ...
it's being picky, but this is extremely important and the source of
90% of most security flaws today.

A standard word is a misnomer. This assumes a two byte word which is
only true on 16-bit architecture. A word can be 16 bits, 32-bits, or
even
11 bits
in some platforms ... it just depends. A double word can be 32 bits,
but it can also be 16 bits in some platforms or not even supported in
others, so there is no standard here.

However, using twos complement, I must again clarrify the minimum and
maximum of a 16 bit value, since it is not -32768 to 32767, I'm
afraid, but is instead -32767 to 32767

As for a 32 bit value, the minimum and maximum are as follows.

Using twos complement, the signed minimum and maximum of a 32-bit
integer are -2147483647 to 2147483647 , and the minimum and maximum of
an unsigned
32 bit integer are 0 to 4294967295

Hope this clears things up.

Take care,
Sina

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Ian D.
Nichols
Sent: Thursday, February 21, 2008 5:40 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: what is Hex?

Hi Listers,

As I see it, things have become a little muddled here, both in James's
message and in Sina's reply.

The standard byte is still 8 bits, containing unsigned values of 0 to
255 and signed values of -128 to +127.

The word contains 16 bits, with unsigned values of 0 to 65535, and
signed values of -32768 to +32767.

The double word contains 32 bits, with very large values possible.
Unsigned, 0 to 4 thousand millions, and signed values  from -2
thousand millions to + 2 thousand millions, more or less.

I hope I've got my thinking straight on that, and haven't caused
further confusion.

All the best,

Ian

Ian D. Nichols,
Toronto, Canada




----- Original Message -----
From: "Sina Bahram" <sbahram@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Thursday, February 21, 2008 4:58 PM
Subject: RE: what is Hex?


A few things. big endian  versus little endian is arbritrary, so it's
not a fact with respect to storage.

More importantly, the minimum and maximum of a signed 32 bit integer
is not
-65535 to 65535, it's actually -32767 to 32767

If it is signed, then it is 0 to 65535

At the end of the day, you only have 2^16 permutations of 16 bits in a
binary system; thus, you have a maximum of 65536 positions, and so you
have half as much capacity if you are using twos complement to allow
for both negative numbers and the concept of 0.

Hope this helps

Take care,
Sina

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of James
Panes
Sent: Thursday, February 21, 2008 2:35 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: what is Hex?

Yes, Hexidecimal numbers are 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, A, B, C, D,
E, F for a total of 16 possible digit values.

As stated before, this is much more convenient for the computer as
16 is an
even power of 2 and computers actually use binary, 0 and 1. The
hexidecimal representation is actually easier for humans to read than
binary.
Hexidecimal digits are grouped into groups of 2 for a total of 16 x
16 or
256 possible values. This is a standard byte. Before unicode, a single
byte value was used to represent an alphanumeric character and two
bytes or a word were used to represent a 32 bit integer with values
possible from
-65535 to 65535. This explains the limit of the size of variables in
older games.

The original Intel 8086 processor had 16 bit registers. Operations for
anything larger had to be synthisized with software.

What's more, for integer values larger than 255, the least significant
pair of digits is stored first. For example, if you were looking for
the value
301 (decimal) in a game save file, you would find it represented as
23 01 in
the save file.

Since this list is about programming and not game save file hacking, I
will end my lecture here.

Anyone with further interest in this topic can write me off-list

Regards,
Jim
jimpanes@xxxxxxxxx
jimpanes@xxxxxxxxxxxx
"Everything is easy when you know how."

----- Original Message -----
From: "Valiant (on laptop)" <valiant@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2008 8:43 AM
Subject: Re: what is Hex?


Hi.
I didn't see anyone mention this part about hex.
Hex is just another number scale like the standard one 0 to 9 or the
binary one 0 to 1. Hex is 0 to f I think, making it bass 16, where the
one we use every day 0 to 9 is bass 10 and binary is bass, hmm,
someone help? 0 to 1?
The possible digits in hex are 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, a, b, c, d,
e, f can't remember if hex starts with 0. It lets you have larger
numbers without taking up as much space. MAC addresses on networking
equipment use it.
some of that could be wrong, it's been two whole years since I had to
study that, here.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Sina Bahram" <sbahram@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Monday, February 18, 2008 4:03 PM
Subject: RE: what is Hex?


21, but yes he is, Thanks Chris

Take care,
Sina

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Marlon
Brandão de Sousa
Sent: Friday, February 15, 2008 12:12 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: what is Hex?

Are you serious about Sina being 22 years old only? Man I have seen
people who have studied computers for many more than this quantity of
years and don't seen to know a half of what Sina knows easily ...
Marlon

2008/2/15, Chris Hofstader <chris.hofstader@xxxxxxxxxxx>:
God Sina, you bring back memories of Z80 and needing to "poke"
instructions and data into memory before execution.  I would have
thought you, who was born in 1986 would never had to get to that
level.  Personally, I think it's a really valuable exercise even
if
one never actually needs to use it in a "real" program just to get
a
better understanding of what a processor "sees"
and how base 16 numbers can be turned into both instructions and
data
depending upon how the processor looks at them.

In the network edition of "Bank Street Writer" a word processing
program written entirely in assembly, that was pretty popular in
the
years before you learned to talk, I added a function called,
"DON'T_CALL_THIS."  If you did call it the program would crash as
the
instructions looked random.  If, however, you looked at the last
handful of bytes of the program as ASCII, it read "FSMITHISAWORM."
Frank Smith, a really great guy, was the client on the gig and we
decided to immortalize him in an Easter Egg that only an ubergeek
could
find.
Now, just for shits and giggles, try to reconstruct the function
in
80x86 assembly and receive the truly wasted chunk of time award.

cdh

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Sina
Bahram
Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2008 9:28 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: what is Hex?

*smile*, wlel actually, if you really want to get down to it ...
it can
be.
Assembler compiles down to executable instructions to the
processor,
which are most often and most easily read in hex.

I used to know almost all of the 8086 instructions and some of
their
hex equivalents a while back. It's really useful when analysing
exploit and virus code.

Take care,
Sina



-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Alex
Hall
Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2008 8:47 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: re: what is Hex?

Right, but it almost sounds like some sort of programming
language.
Have a great day,
Alex

----- Original Message -----
From: Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@xxxxxxxxxxxx
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Date sent: Thu, 14 Feb 2008 17:27:12 -0800
Subject: re: what is Hex?
Hi Alex,
It's a shortened form of hexadecimal.
Cheers,
Joseph
----- Original Message -----
From: Alex Hall <mehgcap@xxxxxxx
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Date sent: Thu, 14 Feb 2008 20:18:21 -0500
Subject: what is Hex?
Hi all
Whatis this Hex that has been talked about
recently?
Have a great day,
Alex
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--
When you say "I wrote a program that crashed Windows," people just
stare at you blankly and say "Hey, I got those with the system, for
free."
Linus Torvalds
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