[lit-ideas] Re: Headlines

>Brill/

and not too disgraceful... The previous German ambassador had to pop up to 
remonstrate about tabloid banner headlines, some, pretty gross

Our newspaper doesn't do tease or wit; it goes for headlines with long 
explanatory elaboration, 

oh heavens. Yes.  I have noticed your papers are more formal.  "Mr Blair" and 
so on.

Goodness that camel headline's dire. 

>Imagine if British headline writers got work moonlighting on academic
titles, "Virgin on the >Ridiculous; Post-humorous Discourse on the Reign
of Elizabeth 1."]

>Perhaps others might like to give the task a try?

I am no good at all at British headlines -- Virgin on the Ridiculous, 
incidentally, reminds me of one of our leading practicioners -- maybe someone 
else is

Judy Evans, Cardiff

--- On Mon, 27/9/10, David Ritchie <ritchierd@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

From: David Ritchie <ritchierd@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: [lit-ideas] Re: Headlines
To: lit-ideas@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Date: Monday, 27 September, 2010, 18:52


On Sep 27, 2010, at 10:20 AM, Judith Evans wrote:
Aren't headlines an odd form? 

I've heard it said the Sun pays its headline writers a fortune.  It was though 
the News of the World that greeted an England 5-1 win over Germany with "Don't 
Mention the Score".  (The Independent, which is supposed to be above that kind 
of thing, did it too.)  The BBC, I sometimes think,is simply (on occasion) 
inept.

Brill/

 British
ones seem to assume more knowledge and agreement than our
local counterparts do.

I don't know what yours are like. But you know this place: small island, 
relatively massive national media, and so on.

Our newspaper doesn't do tease or wit; it goes for headlines with long 
explanatory elaboration, in the manner of academic books and theses.  "Use of 
illegal drugs up 9 percent, study finds," followed by the subhead, beginning 
with category of story, "Health/Ecstasy and meth use increased by double digits 
in 2009, while cocaine use fell."  No caps after the first word; little risk of 
ambiguity.
Occasionally, however, local headline writers try for something pithier, "Stuck 
in a sinkhole, Moses the camel rises from muck with luck."  This was a story 
about a Bactrian camel that someone who either has a rather hazy understanding 
of geography or who just doesn't care about context, uses in Nativity scenes. 
 Manger, baby Jesus, Asian camel.  Of course!  
Moses got stuck in a hole; the fire brigade pulled him out.
Imagine if British headline writers got work moonlighting on academic titles, 
"Virgin on the Ridiculous; Post-humorous Discourse on the Reign of Elizabeth 1."
Perhaps others might like to give the task a try?
David Ritchie,Portland, Oregon 


      

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