[bksvol-discuss] Re: page number locations.

Actually, in checking the book for proofing, I find it easier to have the numbers consistently at the top left of the page. One of my proofreaders asked that I add this to my work on each book I do with her--and I've got it down to not much time, so I do it for everyone, including me.


I do understand it's not part of the scanner's duties and the software is supposed to take care of it. I should have specified that's something I do--not all scanners are required to do it.

Thanks for pointing that out, Roger.

Sandi
----- Original Message ----- From: "Cindy" <popularplace@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Sunday, April 22, 2012 1:03 AM
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] page number locations.




When proofing I sometimes move page numbers that are at the bottom to the top left because I find it easier to check the pagination that way. Besides, I get confused about leaving a line space between the page number at the bottom of the page and the page break and putting a line space between the page break and the first line of text on the next page. I did try keeping the page number on the bottom of the page in my last proofing job and I think I did it o.k. (of course if it turns out either the page number or the first line of the next page are missing, you'll know I didn't do it correctly. smile;It's easier for me as proofer if the page numbers are at the upper left or right, but if they don't scan that way and it's too time-cconsuming for the scanner to move them, that's o.k. I can deal. smile
Cindy
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________________________________
From: Valerie Maples <vlmaples@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Sent: Saturday, April 21, 2012 2:30 PM
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Re: The job of a proofreader is...


While that is true, Roger, many of us still do it to make it easier to check when proofreading book in hand. Also, it is my experience you are less likely to miss a page being numbered, and more likely to number pre-matter so that the numbers don't get re-numbered and no longer match table of contents.


However, you are right; it is not required, just sometimes can make the proofreader's job easier. As I work with Sandi a lot, I am very grateful for that helpful touch.
Valerie


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________________________________
From: Roger Loran Bailey <rogerbailey81@xxxxxxx>
To: bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Sent: Fri, April 20, 2012 10:54:13 AM
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Re: The job of a proofreader is...

Let me point out that one of your tasks need not be done. You need not move the page numbers to the top. Just be sure to leave a blank line at the top of the page. The Bookshare automatic tools will take care of moving the page numbers to the top when the proofread book is submitted.

On 4/20/2012 10:46 AM, Sandi Ryan wrote:
Hi Ann and All,

I agree with you about the duties of a proofreader but, as a scanner, I'd like to add my two cents about scanner duties, too.

If you're scanning a book, you are the person who first offers the book to the collection. Someone, with or without a copy of the book you submit, will have to read through it and decide whether you've done a good job.

When I scan, I scan the book as quickly as possible, making sure every few pages that everything is going well. Then I sit down with the book, move page numbers to the top, strip the headers, put title,
chapters, etc. in appropriate fonts, make sure ellipses and dashes conform to Bookshare format, and read the book to find and correct scannos. Even if I am holding the book for a proofreader I know is meticulous I do these things. There is still plenty for them to do, but I try to let them proofread for pleasure more than to find my pesky errors. Many errors can be found and corrected quickly throughout a book. Those that can't I find by reading every word in the book.

Do I love every book I read? No, but I've found a lot of books I really like that I wouldn't have picked up except to put them in the Bookshare collection. I've learned about lots of things, and I truly love the work I do.

Scanning each book takes me two days to two weeks, depending on the length and the pleasure factor.

Hopefully, when a proofreader gets one of my books, he or she can do a quick
read-through and feel comfortable that the book is ready. But I count on the proofreader to make sure I haven't missed errors. The purpose of two people touching the book is making it as near perfect as possible.

Okay, I'm out of the closet!

Sandi

----- Original Message ----- From: "Ann Parsons" <akp@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Friday, April 20, 2012 7:14 AM
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] The job of a proofreader is...


Hi all,

I'm writing because I just sent off a quality report about a book I'm reading. Oh, I'm going to finish the book, it's part of a series I'm reading, but I have a really hard and knotty
question to ask volunteers.

Here it is, folks. Is it the job of a proofer to actually *read* a book, or can a proofer get away with checking title and so on, and then just pushing the book through?

If you answered that you thought you could get away with just checking metadata, you'd be wrong, wrong three times over. This book I'm reading, Divided Allegiance by Elizabeth Moon, has a wonderful title page and front piece. Then, I started actually *reading* the blessed thing. Well, I wasn't reading it, my DTBM was. Anyway, this book's quality was only good. There were a million scanos including the mangling of the main character's name. Do you know how aggravating it can be when your main character, mentioned about ten times per page has her name mangled five out of those ten times? Scannos like 'ff' for 'if' and garbage chars at the end of pages.

<frowning darkly> There is no excuse for this kind of sloppiness. Why do you think it takes me weeks to proof a book? It's because I actually read every, single, word in the whole blessed book! I have allowed a book to be sent up after reading half or so of it, but only once. That was because the scanner was known to me, the book I had read so far had been aeror free, and I knew that the quality would be the same throughout! If I proof, I read. All this stuff could have been easily fixed! <grrrrr> Sorry for ranting guys, but I devoutly hope that my rant has stopped any lazy proofers in their tracks and caused them to reexamine their work.

Ann P.

-- Ann K. Parsons
Portal Tutoring
EMAIL: akp@xxxxxxxxxxxx
web site: http://www.portaltutoring.info
Skype: Putertutor

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