[access-uk] Re: Buying specialist technology without accessible instructions

Surely CD is better.  CDs can be broken into tracks thus easing access
by being able to skip around.

Still, won't add much to this interesting thread as, by and large, I'm
not effected by the issue at the moment.  Maybe diverting the talking
point too much to say that many manufacturers instructions are in
excruciatingly small print.  The Creative Zenstone being an example.
Another was a Uniross charger.  The blokes at the pub couldn't make
out the instructions on that one!

Cheers,

Ray.

From Ray
I can be contacted off-list at:
mailto:ray-48@xxxxxxxx

-----Original Message-----
Jackie Cairns


Sorry yes I did.  These days it's CD, yet a lot of older people still
prefer cassette, so I would opt for an audio format at the very least.
Only a minority of visually impaired people prefer Braille, and not
everyone wants electronic versions.  My experience of speaking to
anyone using equipment of any specialist nature is that they always
look for a tape or CD in the box; it never fails.

That ok for you mate?  (smile.)

Jackie
----- Original Message -----
From: Steve Nutt
To: access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Sent: Thursday, October 18, 2007 10:12 AM
Subject: [access-uk] Re: Buying specialist technology without
accessible instructions


Hi Jackie,

But you have rather skirted the question <Smile>.  What format would
you give by default if you were a business?

All the best

Steve




From: access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On
Behalf Of Jackie Cairns
Sent: 18 October 2007 10:03
To: access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [access-uk] Re: Buying specialist technology without
accessible instructions


Yes Steve I can see where you are coming from, honestly I can.  But I
think I would still favour an effort on the company's part to supply
something, even if it isn't the preferred format.  I know that it has
got complicated now with digital formats, so your large print or tape
isn't necessarily going to suit any more.

But I would rather know that the company concerned at least went to
some lengths to supply instructions in something alternative to the
one format which, apart from scanning it, isn't any use to me.  I'm
not a manual person, but if you purchase access technology and all you
get in the box is a bulk standard print manual, it immediately becomes
frustrating, and it's happened a lot over the years, though less so
recently I have to say.

But yes, I do see your point of view and concur with it to an extent.

Jackie
----- Original Message -----
From: Steve Nutt
To: access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Sent: Thursday, October 18, 2007 9:51 AM
Subject: [access-uk] Re: Buying specialist technology without
accessible instructions


Hi Jackie,

I totally agree with you here.  But I can also see the other side.  If
you offer something by default in an alternative format, what format
do you offer it in?  If you give someone a tape, they may not have a
tape recorder.  Unlikely, but I have come across it.  If you give
someone a CD player, they may not have the machine to play it on.
Give them a Daisy book, and again the same applies.  Give them
Braille, and they may not be able to read it.

So while I fully agree with you, what alternative format do you give
them by default?  And I stress by default.  If I sell you a Colorino,
I know you have a computer, so I can Email you the instructions.  But
what would be the point in my giving you large print by default, if I
know you are totally blind?  I would ask someone what their format of
choice would be and try to comply as best I can.  But the default
access method worries me.  If you give it to most, but not all, blind
people, then at least someone sighted may be able to read the print in
the family, as a stop gap, until they can request that alternative
format.  So I favour the individual requesting the format of choice,
then hopefully, but not always admittedly, they get it.

All the best

Steve




From: access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:access-uk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On
Behalf Of Jackie Cairns
Sent: 18 October 2007 09:41
To: Access UK Mailing List
Subject: [access-uk] Buying specialist technology without accessible
instructions


On the subject of buying specialist technology with inaccessible
instructions, I'll be very careful how I phrase this because it's
something I've beefed about for years, and it still goes on.

In my personal and humble opinion, wherever a company - no matter who
that retailer is - sells a product or service to someone with a visual
impairment, the instructions accompanying that item should be in an
alternative format to standard print.  How can we have the DDA in this
country if those who have direct influence to ensure accessibility is
met don't in fact comply?

We have invested a lot of money on access technology over the years,
yet I still find myself having to request materials in my preferred
format.

Using the examples of both the Colorino and talking tape measure from
Caretec, neither has accessible instructions, even though I have
sussed out how to use them satisfactorily.  But that isn't the point.
If I could read the instructions, I could surely see to use an
ordinary measure and not need a detector to tell me my colours?

That's where I'm coming from anyway, and I mean no disrespect to any
retailer or individual on the list.  Most companies that deal with
specialist equipment do offer alternative formats, whether it be
through intuitive help on the device itself, or instructions and quick
start references that accompany it.  But there is still an issue with
this.

Jackie



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