[TN-Bird] Re: Weekend Rambles

  • From: <birder1@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <tn-bird@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2003 10:54:31 -0500

Sorry my link got scrambled, I'll try again:

http://home.bellsouth.net/p/s/community.dll?ep=334&fileid=673806&groupid
=116215&folderid=90122&curRec=5&folderview=thumbs&ck

Good birding!!

Mike Todd
McKenzie, TN
Carroll Co.
birder1@xxxxxxxxxxxxx


----- Original Message -----
From: <birder1@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <tn-bird@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Monday, September 08, 2003 10:42 AM
Subject: [TN-Bird] Weekend Rambles


> 9/06/03
> Field trip with Warioto Audubon Society
> Cross Creeks, Britton Ford, Big Sandy-Pace Point
> Stewart, Henry, Benton Co.
>
> 9/07/03
> Cultra Turf Specialists Sod Farm
> Humboldt
> Gibson Co.
>
> After several conversations regarding timing, it was agreed and
planned
> that I would meet several members of the Warioto Audubon Society of
> Clarksville for a supposed shorebird field trip on the 6th. Things
were
> shaping up nicely, KY Lake was finally dropping, and shorebirds were
> responding. The deluge we had earlier in the week pretty much laid
waste
> to any shorebird plans, but we had a great day in the field
nonetheless.
>
> Don Manning and myself met everyone at the visitor center at Cross
> Creeks NWR at 8:30 that morning. Immediately after getting out of the
> car I noticed a lot of activity around some cherry and pine trees near
> the headquarters. We were soon in the midst of a nice mixed-species
> flock, and finally some fall warblers (after seeing everyone's posting
> lately, I was beginning to take my lack of warblers rather
personally!).
> The 1st birds I saw from the parking lot were a Maggie and Prairie
> Warbler. After the group gathered around and started calling birds,
the
> majority of the warblers present were Pines, at least a dozen in all
> shades of plumage, from very drab young birds to bright adult males. A
> rather early Palm Warbler also treated us to a tail-bobbing session.
> Best bird of this flock, (and of the day) was an exquisite
> YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER that I was unfortunately only able to get a
> few people onto as the bird passed quickly through the area. This bird
> was bright enough that it was probably a juvenile bird, as the olive
and
> yellow tones were not too subtle at all. The bird left our area, but
> stayed in the general vicinity as I heard its Pewee-like "pr-eee" call
> once a little later. This would prove to be our only good
concentration
> like this of the day though.
>
> After enjoying the passerines for a while, we decided to see just how
> full the refuge pools were, and full they were. At one pool we stopped
> to look over a dashing young Snowy Egret, and got our only shorebirds
of
> the day other than Killdeer. Three Spotties were unusually traveling
> together, as we saw them looking for a place that suited them. Shortly
> after a large group of Killdeer came into the area, with some peeps in
> tow. They hit a distant plowed field, and the peeps couldn't be
> relocated. Shortly later a second small group of peeps came over head
> which were calling, and they were Semi Sands, which is what the one
bird
> I got on that went into the field with the Killdeer appeared to be.
> Shorebirds were coming through, too bad their habitat was underwater.
> Killdeer were everywhere, with 75-100 seen in the air at one time.
>
> Cross Creeks was good for raptors, with great looks at an almost
> orange-breasted juvenile Harrier that worked over a field just in
front
> of us. We had a great side-by-side comparison with a pair of
> Red-shouldered's, emphasizing the size difference in the large female
> and small male. Conditions were good for raptors, as vultures, mostly
> Blacks, were up in numbers everywhere. It took some looking, but we
> finally got some Broad-winged's up, all at high altitude though. The
1st
> Broadie I saw  was a juvenile in a high-altitude jousting match with a
> same-age Red-shouldered. There was a striking difference in the size
of
> these birds as well, evidently a small male Broad-winged, and big
female
> Red-shouldered. While we were watching these birds, among a group of
> vultures overhead we briefly saw a couple of other Broad-wings at high
> altitude, one of these being a nice banded-tail adult. Not much else
at
> Cross Creeks other than a couple of Pintail sharing a slough with Wood
> Ducks.
>
> We left Cross Creeks on our way to Britton Ford and the Big Sandy
area.
> We didn't stop and look, but on the way over that morning Don and I
> looked at the island out from Paris Landing that is JUST out of the
> water, with several Ring-billed and Caspian present. The group made a
> quick stop at Paris Landing for a sandwich, then loaded back up.
Britton
> Ford was slow as expected, but everyone has an idea where some of the
> good areas are.
>
> On the way over to Big Sandy/Pace Point, we stopped briefly at one of
my
> favorite spots, the inundated Lick Creek flats. Nothing here but
> Killdeer and a Snowy Egret, but that will change as the water drops.
As
> it was mid-day when we were going into Pace Point, the road was pretty
> quiet. Pace Point itself had a little bit of grassy flats exposed,
which
> looked good for Buffies or Baird's, but Killdeer were all we could
find.
> The Point was covered up in Ring-billed Gulls and Caspian's, and while
> we were there a lone basic adult Forster's Tern dropped in for a
little
> variety.
>
> As it was getting late in the day, and I had to work all-night, we
bode
> the group farewell after a wonderful day to be out. It's always nice
to
> meet new people that share your love for birds and the outdoors!
>
> So, after birding all day and working all night, what do you do the
next
> day when you get off? Naturally, you go check out the sod farm that
Mark
> Greene mentioned having Buffies at Friday. I made a small detour on
the
> way home Sunday morning, and wound-up in Humboldt at the Cultra Turf
> Specialists Sod Farm, my 1st time there. The number of Killdeer was
> astronomical (a quick count was 350+), and one of the 1st birds I came
> across was a very ratty, molting adult AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER. It
didn't
> take much longer to start picking up BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPERS in the
> distance, with their distinctive tip-toeing foraging action and golden
> color. I finally tallied seven Buffies, with a group of five hanging
> together, and two more doing their thing on their own. I didn't see
any
> likely Pectoral or Baird's candidates, but with that many birds spread
> over that much area, they could have easily been there. A single
> Solitary (fitting I guess) at a small mud puddle along the edge
rounded
> out the shorebirds.  Thanks Mark for posting this location. None of
the
> Buffies ever came in very close, but I did get a decent shot of one
> which I'm posting to my website, under the "Uncommon to rare local
birds
> (vol.3)" album. The following link should put you straigth to the
> Buffie:
>
http://home.bellsouth.net/p/s/community.dll?ep=334&fileid=673806&groupid
> =116215&folderid=90122&curRec=5&folderview=thumbs&ck=.
>
> Those Buffies looked pretty good out there, but I'm not sure if my bed
> didn't look a little better when I finally got home!
>
> Good birding!!
>
>
>
> Mike Todd
> McKenzie, TN
> Carroll Co.
> birder1@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>
>
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=================NOTES TO SUBSCRIBER=====================

The TN-Bird Net requires you to sign your messages with
first and last name, city (town) and state abbreviation.
-----------------------------------------------------
To post to this mailing list, simply send email to:
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----------------------------------------------------- 
To unsubscribe, send email to:
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with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Topographical Maps located at http://topozone.com/find.asp
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
     Visit the Tennessee Ornithological Society
          web site at http://www.tnbirds.org
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
    TN-Bird Net Owner: Wallace Coffey, Bristol, TN
        jwcoffey@xxxxxxxxxx      (423) 764-3958
=========================================================


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