[SI-LIST] Re: si-list Digest V17 #91

  • From: steve@xxxxxxxxxxxx
  • To: dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx, si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx, ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx, "xiaoguang.wang" <xiaoguang.wang@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Tue, 30 May 2017 15:26:20 +0000 (UTC)

Most VRM ceramic caps are resonant above several MHz, so any excess plane 
inductance is abive that (10's of ).  The ceramic decouplign caps are there 
only for the purpose of taming the inductance of the planes, without which 
decoupling would be unnecessary. 



Thinner dielectric, high K dielectrics and external capacitors are all tools 
used to tame the PDN excess inductance.




Regards,




Steven M. Sandler


Managing Director


www.picotest.com


(480) 375-0075







On Mon, May 29, 2017 at 8:25 PM -0700, "xiaoguang.wang" 
<xiaoguang.wang@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:










gu;



uw9600



z

wyyoywod

xl0啊mox







发自我的小米手机在 Martom Last 
<dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>,2017å¹´5月23日 ä¸Šåˆ5:43写道:




Steven,

I'm not sure I completely understood what you meant when you said that "The 
purpose of the decoupling capacitors is to cancel the residual inductance from 
the more distant capacitors, vias and power planes." Can you please clarify 
and/or elaborate your comment?

I understand the general limitations of the lumped circuit element approach 
that Spice uses, but the wavelength of a few "10's of MHz" in my small-sized 
FR4 laminate is several meters long. Why "10s of MHz" and not, say, "a few 100s 
of MHz"? The latter would still be a severe limitation of course, but 
regardless of that I would like to know how you reached your figure. 



Regards,

Martin



      From: "steve@xxxxxxxxxxxx" <steve@xxxxxxxxxxxx>

 To: si-list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx; si-list digest users <ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> 

 Sent: Monday, May 15, 2017 8:54 AM

 Subject: [SI-LIST] Re: si-list Digest V17 #91

   

Martin,







The purpose of the decoupling capacitors us to cancel the residual inductance 
from the more distant capacitors, vias and power planes.  Simulating in SPICE 
and including only the plane capacitance doesn'represent this well above a few 
10's of MHz maximum.  This is why we use EM simulators for PDN assessment.









Higher bandwidth VRMs can also become susceptible to stability issues, 
particularly when remote sense is used.  This can be due to the phase delay 
contributed by the PCB,

















Regards,









Steven M. Sandler





Managing Director





www.picotest.com





(480) 375-0075















On Mon, May 15, 2017 at 7:11 AM +0200, "FreeLists Mailing List Manager" 
<ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:





















si-list Digest    Sun, 14 May 2017    Volume: 17  Issue: 091



In This Issue:

    #1:    From: "Martom Last"  (Redacted sender "yahbalo"

    Â Â Â  Subject: [SI-LIST] First-order modelling of parallel-plate 
capacitanc

    #2:    From: Istvan Novak 

    Â Â Â  Subject: [SI-LIST] Re: First-order modelling of parallel-plate 
capaci



----------------------------------------------------------------------



Msg: #1 in digest

Date: Sun, 14 May 2017 18:24:24 +0000 (UTC)

From: "Martom Last"  (Redacted sender "yahbalo"

Subject: [SI-LIST] First-order modelling of parallel-plate capacitance



Hi

I'm trying to understand why, for a given laminate, a parallel plate capacitor 
with area A and plate separation distance d is a better high-frequency charge 
reservoir than a parallel plate capacitor with area 2A and separation distance 
2d. 

On page 10 in [1], Lee Ritchey states that 



"Planes in parallel naturally form a capacitor. As the planes are placed closer 
together two things happen.  First, the capacitance between them increases 
and, second, their inductance decreases. When the planes are separated by 2-3 
mils (51-76 microns) the capacitance approaches 400 pF per square inch (6.5 pF 
square cm) and the inductance becomes very low compared to that of discrete 
capacitors (a few picoHenries). It is this very low inductance that makes this 
capacitor function well into the hundreds of megahertz."

My guess here is that since a tightly coupled plane pair holds more charge per 
area than a loosely coupled plane pair, the current loop related to charge 
transfer to and from the plane pair, and hence the inductance, is less in the 
tightly coupled case where more local charge is available. Is this 
understanding correct? 



What is the mathematical relationship between the inter-plane separation 
distance and the series inductance of the resulting capacitance?



Also, when I model my PDN in Spice I usually add an ideal "plane" capacitor, 
the value of which I base on a simple ideal parallel plate capacitor with area 
equal to the board/plane area. However, this approach does not seem to take 
into account the finite propagation velocity in a typical FR4 type laminate, 
and I'm now thinking that this ideal capacitor representation of my plane 
capacitance (as seen by a fast switching IC) should be reduced to only include 
the parallel plate disk with radius r=v*t, where v is the propagation velocity 
and t is the time it takes to move charge. Charge outside this disk would take 
longer than the rise time of the signal and be invisible. Does this make sense?

[1] Designing a Power Delivery Subsystem (2011, Lee Ritchey)



Regards,

Martin



------------------------------



Msg: #2 in digest

Date: Sun, 14 May 2017 18:43:16 -0400

From: Istvan Novak 

Subject: [SI-LIST] Re: First-order modelling of parallel-plate capacitance



Hi Martin,



In short, if we ignore the modal resonances for a second, you have 

static plane capacitance and the separation-related inductance, which 

forms a V-shape impedance profile, similar to that of capacitors.  The 

inductance of the planes is frequency, shape and location dependent, but 

for a quick guide you can use the approximate sheet inductance, which is 

33pH for each miliinch of separation.  At high frequencies (which is a 

relative term) you are likely beyond the first series resonance of the 

planes, so the impedance is dominated by the inductive reactance, which 

in turn is dependent only on the plane separation and independent of the 

static capacitance.



You can find a lot of free material posted on the web on this subject, 

see for instance



http://www.electrical-integrity.com/Paper_download_files/DC08_Modal_Suppress_SUN.pdf



Regards,



Istvan Novak



Oracle





On 5/14/2017 2:24 PM, Martom Last (Redacted sender yahbalo for DMARC) wrote:

Hi

I'm trying to understand why, for a given laminate, a parallel plate 
capacitor with area A and plate separation distance d is a better 
high-frequency charge reservoir than a parallel plate capacitor with area 2A 
and separation distance 2d.

On page 10 in [1], Lee Ritchey states that



"Planes in parallel naturally form a capacitor. As the planes are placed 
closer together two things happen.à First, the capacitance between them 
increases and, second, their inductance decreases. When the planes are 
separated by 2-3 mils (51-76 microns) the capacitance approaches 400 pF per 
square inch (6.5 pF square cm) and the inductance becomes very low compared 
to that of discrete capacitors (a few picoHenries). It is this very low 
inductance that makes this capacitor function well into the hundreds of 
megahertz."

My guess here is that since a tightly coupled plane pair holds more charge 
per area than a loosely coupled plane pair, the current loop related to 
charge transfer to and from the plane pair, and hence the inductance, is less 
in the tightly coupled case where more local charge is available. Is this 
understanding correct?



What is the mathematical relationship between the inter-plane separation 
distance and the series inductance of the resulting capacitance?



Also, when I model my PDN in Spice I usually add an ideal "plane" capacitor, 
the value of which I base on a simple ideal parallel plate capacitor with 
area equal to the board/plane area. However, this approach does not seem to 
take into account the finite propagation velocity in a typical FR4 type 
laminate, and I'm now thinking that this ideal capacitor representation of my 
plane capacitance (as seen by a fast switching IC) should be reduced to only 
include the parallel plate disk with radius r=v*t, where v is the propagation 
velocity and t is the time it takes to move charge. Charge outside this disk 
would take longer than the rise time of the signal and be invisible. Does 
this make sense?

[1] Designing a Power Delivery Subsystem (2011, Lee Ritchey)



Regards,

Martin

------------------------------------------------------------------

To unsubscribe from si-list:

si-list-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field



or to administer your membership from a web page, go to:

http://www.freelists.org/webpage/si-list



For help:

si-list-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with 'help' in the Subject field





List forum  is accessible at:

  Â  Â  Â  Â  Â  Â  Â  http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/si-list



List archives are viewable at:

    Â Â Â  http://www.freelists.org/archives/si-list

  

Old (prior to June 6, 2001) list archives are viewable at:

  Â Â Â  Â Â Â  http://www.qsl.net/wb6tpu

  Â  









------------------------------



End of si-list Digest V17 #91

*****************************















------------------------------------------------------------------

To unsubscribe from si-list:

si-list-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field



or to administer your membership from a web page, go to:

http://www.freelists.org/webpage/si-list



For help:

si-list-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with 'help' in the Subject field





List forum  is accessible at:

  Â  Â  Â  Â  Â  Â  http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/si-list



List archives are viewable at:  Â  

    Â Â Â  http://www.freelists.org/archives/si-list

 

Old (prior to June 6, 2001) list archives are viewable at:

 Â Â Â  Â Â Â  http://www.qsl.net/wb6tpu

  







   

------------------------------------------------------------------

To unsubscribe from si-list:

si-list-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field



or to administer your membership from a web page, go to:

http://www.freelists.org/webpage/si-list



For help:

si-list-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with 'help' in the Subject field





List forum  is accessible at:

               http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/si-list



List archives are viewable at:     

                http://www.freelists.org/archives/si-list

 

Old (prior to June 6, 2001) list archives are viewable at:

                http://www.qsl.net/wb6tpu

  












------------------------------------------------------------------
To unsubscribe from si-list:
si-list-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with 'unsubscribe' in the Subject field

or to administer your membership from a web page, go to:
http://www.freelists.org/webpage/si-list

For help:
si-list-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with 'help' in the Subject field


List forum  is accessible at:
               http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/si-list

List archives are viewable at:     
                http://www.freelists.org/archives/si-list
 
Old (prior to June 6, 2001) list archives are viewable at:
                http://www.qsl.net/wb6tpu
  

Other related posts: