[ SHOWGSD-L ] Re: Demodex

  • From: "Norma Ramey" <gsdramey@xxxxxxx>
  • To: <spotted101@xxxxxxxxxxx>, <pinehillgsds@xxxxxxx>, <arycrest@xxxxxxxxxxx>, <showgsd-l@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Thu, 3 Sep 2009 14:24:57 -0500

Hi, to continue our "learning etc." on this oddity, I'd like to say that, 
yes, immune systems and stress etc. play a big part in the "active or 
passive" behavior of the
"mites"!!!  Jessica, your mentioning "on the leg" gives me a hint that 
perhaps it was sarcoptic not demodex.  There is a difference in these two 
bugs for sure.  In
my post I mentioned this.   I'd love to know the details of the history of 
that male and the offspring who apparently had mange.  Also, the environment 
itself has
a lot to do with the "active and/or passive" behavior of the bugs.  These 
are bugs folks, like ticks, flies, fleas etc. but the difference is they are 
microscopic and
there are also, as I mentioned quite a few different kinds far beyond the 
demo and sarcops.  If a Vet can make an error about what this is, surely an 
error in
identifying the little mite could also be easily made as well.   I've not 
studied the other manges a lot, simply because these 2 are the most common. 
Yes, as I
said, the sarcops can move onto humans, but in my studies, demo doesn't. 
Even just a little pink or some such on the face, nose, ear area or what 
have you
can be a sign of demo and it's common name IS   red mange!   The other is 
similar but a bit different as you watch the areas affected.  Please please 
do as I
said -----  investigate on your own ---- hereditary genes have nothing 
whatsoever to do with these little mites -- period!  TNX      Norma
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Jessica MacMillan" <spotted101@xxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <pinehillgsds@xxxxxxx>; <arycrest@xxxxxxxxxxx>; 
<showgsd-l@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Thursday, September 03, 2009 11:33 AM
Subject: [ SHOWGSD-L ] Re: Demodex


We have had some Dals in the past with it - varying from little spots (one 
on the leg) to several.... My understanding is that all living beings have 
the mites on them.  They exist in our eyebrows, around our noses, and so 
on.. Dogs have them.... Normally, the immune system can hold them off. 
However, when the immune system is compromised in someway and usually during 
the "teenage" years of a dog's life, the mites take over.

I have bred the dogs with demo and I don't know how hereditary the demo is 
itself - but I do wonder about the immune systems. Two of the bitches that 
had it we bred and their offspring were fine. A stud dog had several spots 
of it and his kids also had it - after three litters, we didn't use him 
again... He didn't live a life as long as most Dals, so I wonder....

Jessica MacMillan
Paisley Dals (www.paisleydals.com)
& The Shepherd Girls (Simmie, CGC, TDI, TC, HIC & Pepper, HIC)
Member of: DCA, GSDCA & GTCDC


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