[rollei_list] Re: OT: Terrabyte hard drive.

  • From: Mark Rabiner <mark@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <rollei_list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2008 16:24:29 -0400

By the way I just checked while an Abacus might be from Japan not china a
Dice is South Asian. Meaning in this case Iran or India.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dice
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abacus



The Abacus is still taught to the blind (from the above):
Although blind students have benefited from talking calculators, the abacus
is still very often taught to these students in early grades, both in public
schools and state schools for the blind. The abacus teaches math skills that
can never be replaced with talking calculators and is an important learning
tool for blind students. Blind students also complete math assignments using
a braille-writer and Nemeth code (a type of braille code for math) but large
multiplication and long division problems can be long and difficult. The
abacus gives blind and visually impaired students a tool to compute math
problems that equals the speed and mathematical knowledge required by their
sighted peers using pencil and paper. Many blind people find this number
machine a very useful tool throughout life.[citation needed]


mark@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Mark William Rabiner
[citation needed]



> From: Mark Rabiner <mark@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Reply-To: <rollei_list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2008 16:12:47 -0400
> To: <rollei_list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Conversation: [rollei_list] Re: OT: Terrabyte hard drive.
> Subject: [rollei_list] Re: OT: Terrabyte hard drive.
> 
> When I was twelve there was an abacas in some gifts I got and I learned to
> use it. A Lionel kit perhaps.
> That made me the only one I ever knew those days who ever had and or used
> one. It helped me with my math homework like all getout.. I was a whiz on
> it. That was 1963,
> I could not bring it to school though it offended deeply my teachers who I
> surmised thought I was somehow messing with them. Making fun of the whole
> deal. I don't think they even thought I was really able to use it it just
> offended them on other levels.
> In the past years we talked about this on the lists. Not sure if it was this
> one. 
> I was not the only one it turned out who used one in the US of A.
> Or had a darkroom.
> I relocated my abacus and downloaded some instructions and printed them out
> on how to use it. And read about if they were from China or Japan it was the
> non obvious one so that would make that Japan.
> But so far...
> No dice.
> 
> 
> 
> mark@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Mark William Rabiner
> 
> 
> 
>> From: Richard Knoppow <dickburk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>> Reply-To: <rollei_list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>> Date: Sat, 18 Oct 2008 07:14:41 -0700
>> To: <rollei_list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>> Subject: [rollei_list] Re: OT: Terrabyte hard drive.
>> 
>> 
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "Robert Lilley" <54moggie@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>> To: <rollei_list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>> Sent: Friday, October 17, 2008 2:53 PM
>> Subject: [rollei_list] Re: OT: Terrabyte hard drive.
>> 
>> 
>>> I seem to recall that my K&E Log Log Duplex Trig didn't
>>> have any ram or hard
>>> drive.  You had to move a wood bar and a bit of glass in
>>> consort with scales
>>> to get a very simple answer denoted as a number.
>>> 
>>> Rob
>>> 
>>     One can consider the sliding scale and fiduciary to be
>> memory especially where one is transferring a partial result
>> to another scale.
>>     A slide rule is an interesting example of an analogue
>> computer. The main slide really sets up a programmed
>> function (according to the scales used) which gives a
>> continuum of values. The fiduciary is used to select a
>> particular value.
>>     I was taught to use one very early (I think I was about
>> forteen), using a Fredric Post wood rule (I've drawn a blank
>> on the name of this type), I still have it. I have in front
>> of me a Pickett & Eckel log-log dual base slide rule with
>> its leather scabbard. Its made of metal with a yellow finish
>> (easy on the eyes I guess). I now have to use reading
>> glasses to use it comfortably. Those of us trained in the
>> use of the slide rule had to learn to make mental
>> approximations to solutions in order to get the order of
>> magnitude and to avoid reciprocal results in some cases.
>> That has proved quite valuable. I still use my slide rule
>> occasionally.
>> 
>> --
>> Richard Knoppow
>> Los Angeles, CA, USA
>> dickburk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>> 
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