[python] Re: python Digest V16 #1

  • From: Patrick van Gompel <patrick_van_gompel@xxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "python@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <python@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Thu, 4 Jan 2018 16:29:50 +0000

Hi again,


Thank you for your reply.

Yes, I got the idea of your triple pivot right then I guess. Quite a challenge 
such a design ;-)


A few more things that crossed my mind.

I understand you want to keep things light. I am just concerned about your 
safety, haha. Safety goes first!

I have seen my M8 bolts holding my rear wheels, broken like 5 times. The bigest 
problem in my eyes was that I never new for sure whether my trike would 'hold'. 
I could bumb on my seat, race over traffic ramps at full speed or use a heavy 
trailer to test whether the M8 bolts would hold and it would all seem ok. Then 
the next gentle drive over an even road might just snap the bolt all of a 
sudden and you can only pray there isn't a car hitting you when you are on your 
uncontrolable trike sliding forward. You won't notice the small cracks in your 
bolts when they are attached to your trike, till they snap!

That's why I am wary when I see your setup.


About the 50mm rod end distance. It has been quite some time ago that I used 
all those force calculations at school, so I might be wrong. But I had a 100mm 
distance, which is double your size. If the lenght of the 'arm of force' is 
roughly double, then the force is half. So for example; if my M12 rod end had 
to endure 100kg, your M10 rod end will have to endure 200kg. (of cource it's 
not only about the distance between rod ends)

You could make some rough calculations about how much your rod ends and locking 
bolts have to endure. I am probably not your best man for that, but I would 
really do some calculations myself when I would make such a design. My feeling 
says your design with M10 is not safe.


The upper bolt could screw deeper into the central bar but if the lower bolt is 
only 10mm into the outer ring, then I assume that 10mm into the central bar 
would be adequate.

I agree that 10mm into some material for M10 is ok, but your upper bolt has to 
endure a lot more than your lower one. Depending on how you machine the outer 
ring, there will be two bolts dealing with the forces that want to push this 
whole pivot downwards. But for the inner part (30mm bar) there is only the 
upper bolt. And this upper bolt also has a 10mm longer size with no fixed 
thread. So I think the upper bolt will snap or bend first.


If I make the bolts 12mm or larger, the central bar will have no strength at 
all!

I take it you mean going from M10 to M12. You could only do that with M12 rod 
ends, as both thread and hole are always the same I think.


Just an idea, but why not use the lower bolt in the same way as the upper. Of 
cource, you would need to screw two bolts instead of one every time you 
pack/unpack, but at least this upper bolt will have his lower brother helping 
out 😉


I haven't really looked at your front pivot as it is a bit hard to see in your 
drawing how it is exactely made. But the thin material and bolt makes me 
curious about the strenght of it. Is this whole part (which basically holds the 
rear part of the trike attached to the front) just fixed with a M10 bolt? 
Calculations on this part are a bit easier I think, but again, my feeling says 
that this won't hold over time.


I am interested in your improved design!


Good luck,

Patrick




________________________________
Van: python-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx <python-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> namens Howard 
Stevens <hstevens94@xxxxxxxxx>
Verzonden: donderdag 4 januari 2018 10:23
Aan: python@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Onderwerp: [python] Re: python Digest V16 #1

Hullo Jurgen, Steffen, Dirk, and Patrick,
Thanks for your advice about my unusual  pivot joint.  I can imagine how hard 
it is to figure out what I am doing!  I hope you can see the drawings of the 
basic concept as well as the joint (I can't see any diagrams in my post for 
some reason!!).  It is actually a triple joint!  As well as the normal steering 
pivot with rod ends, the front section rotates 90 degrees on a horizontal 
longitudinal axis so wheel lies horizontally and then rotates through 180 
degrees on a horizontal transverse axis (outer ring over central bar).  It is 
hard to describe so please tell me if you don't have the basic folding concept 
drawing.

I agree that the whole thing is a bit light, but then I have to fly over to 
Europe with it and want it to be as light as possible.  Being too heavy was the 
trouble with my other trikes!  Patrick, you think that the 50mm rod end 
separation may be OK so long as it is accurately machined without any slack, 
which is good news .  I would get the best rod ends available. If I go bigger 
with rod ends and pivot bolts, I will end up with an ugly and very heavy joint. 
 I weigh around 75Kg and the luggage at the rear may balance that somewhat.  I 
also am an old bastard....71years old now, so no heroics for me!!  Gentle 
riding mostly on sealed pathways and perhaps with a motor in one of the rear 
hubs
( that works a treat on my current one!) ......And before long I may  have to 
convert it to a mobility scooter for the disabled and have a motor in each rear 
hub!!

As has been mentioned, there is no adjustment for pivot angle on this, but the 
geometry is the same as my existing trike and I have found an angle of 55 
degrees seems to be the one that works.  Perhaps you remember previous 
discussions on this Dirk.  I had a lot of PSI, probably because my pivot was 
about 100mm in front of my hip line, but I followed your suggestion and 
decreased the angle to 55 degrees, which did the trick without too much wheel 
flop.  This new joint will be much more in line with the hip joints so perhaps 
I will have to increase it again?!  I remember that Hippiron had an angle of 53 
degrees so wonder if the reduced angle works better for trikes, but haven't 
heard anyone on Freelists suggesting this.  The locking with the upper bolt,  I 
thought quite elegant as it is simple and serves 2 purposes, but of course if 
it is too weak it wont serve any purpose at all!    It is a worry that the 
stresses are shear forces.  It might make a good bolt cutter!  The upper bolt 
could screw deeper into the central bar but if the lower bolt is only 10mm into 
the outer ring, then I assume that 10mm into the central bar would be adequate. 
 If I make the bolts 12mm or larger, the central bar will have no strength at 
all!  I could use another locking bolt on the outside which would mean that the 
upper bolt would be the same as the lower one and just screw into the rotating 
outer ring, but there goes the elegance!!  Or I could leave it as it is and 
just make a spare bolt!

So I have created a bit of a monster it seems, but with such expertise, 
experience and helpful advice, I am sure I will get out there soon!  Thank you 
so much for helping me with this, as I am no engineer either!  Best wishes  
Howard

On Thu, Jan 4, 2018 at 4:06 PM, FreeLists Mailing List Manager 
<ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>> wrote:
python Digest   Wed, 03 Jan 2018        Volume: 16  Issue: 001

In This Issue:
                [python] Re: python Digest V15 #19
                [python] Re: python Digest V15 #19
                [python] Re: python Digest V15 #19
                [python] Re: python Digest V15 #19

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Howard Stevens <hstevens94@xxxxxxxxx<mailto:hstevens94@xxxxxxxxx>>
Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2018 17:30:38 +1000
Subject: [python] Re: python Digest V15 #19

Having trouble getting my post accepted so have reduced the size of my
attachment.  Any comments on the effectiveness of a pivot joint like this?
In particular is it possible to have just 50mm between rod ends?  I need to
make the front section fold into the frame of the seat and so want the
pivot joint to be able to rotate on the front bar of the seat.  Hope you ca
understand the idea.
On Mon, Jan 1, 2018 at 4:06 PM, FreeLists Mailing List Manager <
ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>> wrote:

python Digest   Sun, 31 Dec 2017        Volume: 15  Issue: 019

In This Issue:
                [python] Re: python Digest V15 #17
                [python] Re: python Digest V15 #17

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Howard Stevens <hstevens94@xxxxxxxxx<mailto:hstevens94@xxxxxxxxx>>
Date: Sun, 31 Dec 2017 16:24:15 +1000
Subject: [python] Re: python Digest V15 #17

Hullo Pythonauts,
Happy New Year from Australia.  I am making a new light weight travelling
trike and am interested in any comments/advice you can give me.
Because my trikes must fold, the pivot joint is a little in  front of the
hip line which creates a bit more PSI  I found a pivot joint angle of
around 55 degrees settled this with minimal flop. However if my new joint
is feasible I think I might be able to improve on this.  My main concern is
how to make it strong enough and whether the rod end separation of about
50mm will work.  Comments please!   I posted more detailed drawings but
they must have been too big and my post didn't appear!  Hope this one will!
Howard Stevens
On Wed, Dec 6, 2017 at 4:06 PM, FreeLists Mailing List Manager <
ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>> wrote:

python Digest   Tue, 05 Dec 2017        Volume: 15  Issue: 017

In This Issue:
                [python] Re: Velomobile development drawings: Part 4

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Kenneth Stewart 
<kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx>>
Subject: [python] Re: Velomobile development drawings: Part 4
Date: Tue, 5 Dec 2017 13:15:55 +0000

Hi Darin,
You are right the trike tilts as you turn, it's not designed as tilt
steer it's only a side effect.

The main point of a tilting trike is to try and keep narrow and light
wheels in line with forces.

A few years ago I looked building a motorised tilting trike, and the I
came across a guy in Australia who had built one, got it certified and
registered and couldn't keep it out of the ditches.
The control of steering and tilting together was too much in unplanned
road conditions. I went off the idea shortly afterwards.

Kenny


On 5 Dec 2017, at 05:05, Darin Wick wrote:

If I understand the renderings correctly, it's a tadpole trike where
the crank-seat-rearwheel assembly tilts, and the pivot is set up so
that tilting causes the front axle (sort of a cart axle that runs all
the way across with the wheels fixed to either end) to turn in the
direction of the lean.  Or, conversely, the trike has to lean into the
corner as you turn.

I knew someone with a similar trike - a tadpole with the front cross
set up to pivot at an angle so it would lean as it turned.  It was,
effectively, a tilt-steer trike.  I don't have photos, but you can see
a couple pictures of something very similar here: http://tiltingvehicles
.
blogspot.com/2010/07/zepher-tilt-steer-tadpole.html<http://blogspot.com/2010/07/zepher-tilt-steer-tadpole.html>

It was simple, elegant, and great fun to ride, but had two major
problems:
1) the ratio of tilt to steer was fixed by the pivot angle, so it only
worked well within a certain range of speeds
2) on crowned roads (or any other uneven surface) the rider had to
keep the seat perpendicular to the surface to go straight, which meant
leaning at an odd angle

He concluded that, if at all possible, you should keep the tilting and
steering mechanisms independent.

-Darin

---- On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 12:19:13 -0800 Kenneth Stewart <
kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx>
 > wrote ----

Hi Jurgen,

I am aware of tilting trikes with lean steer, but my design does not
work like that.

The front axle is rigid, there is no Ackerman steering, the wheels do
not pivot. The axle pivots at 65 degrees to horizontal at the front of
the body.

The body, chassis, transmission, seat, and rear wheel are one unit

As the front axle is turned the body leans by means of the geometry
into the bend. There are no extra levers to control the lean.


Regards

Ken


On 4 Dec 2017, at 19:45, J眉rgen Mages wrote:

Thanks Ken, this makes the steering principle more clearer to me. The
design reminds me of Greg Kolodziejzyk's lean steer trike (see similar
concept in the attached gif).

The steering pivot seems to be behind the rider and the rider plus the
whole front part is one single unit that tilts - correct?

If so I would consider it to be rearwheel steered (RWS) and not python-
ish ;-)

Regards,
J眉rgen.


On 04.12.2017 19:40, Kenneth Stewart wrote:
 > Hi Jurgen,
 >
 > I have just published the section concerning Python geometry on my
 > website. Please have a look and see if it makes sense.
 >
 > Regards
 >
 > Ken Stewart
 >
 > http://kenstewartartist.com/
 >
 >
 >

<4barslinkage.gif>






============================================================

This is the Python Mailinglist

http://www.freelists.org/list/python

Listmaster: Jurgen Mages jmages@xxxxxx<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx>

To unsubscribe send an empty mail to
python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
with 'unsubscribe' in the subject field.

============================================================











------------------------------

End of python Digest V15 #17
****************************





------------------------------

Subject: [python] Re: python Digest V15 #17
From: =?UTF-8?Q?J眉rgen_Mages?= <jmages@xxxxxx<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx>>
Date: Sun, 31 Dec 2017 11:39:35 +0100

Hi Howard - happy new year to you! Unfortunately, here we are still
stuck in 2017 ;-)

It is always a pleasure to hear from your new projects. A more detailled
answer will follow soon ...

If you agree, I will update your Python wiki project page:

http://en.openbike.org/wiki/Python_Trikes#Howard_Stevens_Mk3.2C_Australia

Best regards,
J眉rgen.


On 31.12.2017 07:24, Howard Stevens wrote:
Hullo Pythonauts,
Happy New Year from Australia.  I am making a new light weight
travelling trike and am interested in any comments/advice you can give
me.
Because my trikes must fold, the pivot joint is a little in  front of
the hip line which creates a bit more PSI  I found a pivot joint angle
of around 55 degrees settled this with minimal flop. However if my new
joint is feasible I think I might be able to improve on this.  My main
concern is how to make it strong enough and whether the rod end
separation of about 50mm will work.  Comments please!   I posted more
detailed drawings but they must have been too big and my post didn't
appear!  Hope this one will!
Howard Stevens

On Wed, Dec 6, 2017 at 4:06 PM, FreeLists Mailing List Manager
<ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>>> wrote:

    python Digest   Tue, 05 Dec 2017        Volume: 15  Issue: 017

    In This Issue:
                    [python] Re: Velomobile development drawings: Part 4

    ------------------------------------------------------------
----------

    From: Kenneth Stewart 
<kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx>
    <mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx>>>
    Subject: [python] Re: Velomobile development drawings: Part 4
    Date: Tue, 5 Dec 2017 13:15:55 +0000

    Hi Darin,
    You are right the trike tilts as you turn, it's not designed as tilt
    steer it's only a side effect.

    The main point of a tilting trike is to try and keep narrow and light
    wheels in line with forces.

    A few years ago I looked building a motorised tilting trike, and the
I
    came across a guy in Australia who had built one, got it certified
and
    registered and couldn't keep it out of the ditches.
    The control of steering and tilting together was too much in
unplanned
    road conditions. I went off the idea shortly afterwards.

    Kenny


    On 5 Dec 2017, at 05:05, Darin Wick wrote:

    If I understand the renderings correctly, it's a tadpole trike where
    the crank-seat-rearwheel assembly tilts, and the pivot is set up so
    that tilting causes the front axle (sort of a cart axle that runs all
    the way across with the wheels fixed to either end) to turn in the
    direction of the lean.  Or, conversely, the trike has to lean into
the
    corner as you turn.

    I knew someone with a similar trike - a tadpole with the front cross
    set up to pivot at an angle so it would lean as it turned.  It was,
    effectively, a tilt-steer trike.  I don't have photos, but you can
see
    a couple pictures of something very similar here:
    http://tiltingvehicles.blogspot.com/2010/07/zepher-
tilt-steer-tadpole.html
    <http://tiltingvehicles.blogspot.com/2010/07/zepher-
tilt-steer-tadpole.html>

    It was simple, elegant, and great fun to ride, but had two major
    problems:
    1) the ratio of tilt to steer was fixed by the pivot angle, so it
only
    worked well within a certain range of speeds
    2) on crowned roads (or any other uneven surface) the rider had to
    keep the seat perpendicular to the surface to go straight, which
meant
    leaning at an odd angle

    He concluded that, if at all possible, you should keep the tilting
and
    steering mechanisms independent.

    -Darin

    ---- On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 12:19:13 -0800 Kenneth Stewart
    <kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx
<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx>>
     > wrote ----

    Hi Jurgen,

    I am aware of tilting trikes with lean steer, but my design does not
    work like that.

    The front axle is rigid, there is no Ackerman steering, the wheels do
    not pivot. The axle pivots at 65 degrees to horizontal at the front
of
    the body.

    The body, chassis, transmission, seat, and rear wheel are one unit

    As the front axle is turned the body leans by means of the geometry
    into the bend. There are no extra levers to control the lean.


    Regards

    Ken


    On 4 Dec 2017, at 19:45, J眉rgen Mages wrote:

    Thanks Ken, this makes the steering principle more clearer to me. The
    design reminds me of Greg Kolodziejzyk's lean steer trike (see
similar
    concept in the attached gif).

    The steering pivot seems to be behind the rider and the rider plus
the
    whole front part is one single unit that tilts - correct?

    If so I would consider it to be rearwheel steered (RWS) and not
python-
    ish ;-)

    Regards,
    J眉rgen.


    On 04.12.2017 19:40, Kenneth Stewart wrote:
     > Hi Jurgen,
     >
     > I have just published the section concerning Python geometry on my
     > website. Please have a look and see if it makes sense.
     >
     > Regards
     >
     > Ken Stewart
     >
     > http://kenstewartartist.com/
     >
     >
     >

    <4barslinkage.gif>






    ============================================================

    This is the Python Mailinglist

    http://www.freelists.org/list/python
    <http://www.freelists.org/list/python>

    Listmaster: Jurgen Mages jmages@xxxxxx<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx
<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx>>

    To unsubscribe send an empty mail to
    python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
<mailto:python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>>
    with 'unsubscribe' in the subject field.

    ============================================================











    ------------------------------

    End of python Digest V15 #17
    ****************************




------------------------------

End of python Digest V15 #19
****************************





------------------------------

From: Patrick van Gompel 
<patrick_van_gompel@xxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:patrick_van_gompel@xxxxxxxxxxx>>
Subject: [python] Re: python Digest V15 #19
Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2018 16:08:57 +0000

Hi Howard,

Happy new year too!

I had a look at your nice drawings. I am not an engineer or anything, but to 
me, your design seems to be a bit weak. There is a lot of force on this part of 
a Python.

I am not sure whether I understand your design correctly, but is it the outer 
ring (50x10mm) that turns around the inner? If so, only your upper pin is 
holding the pivot point (against turning your whole front side upwards). If 
this is a M10 thread, you have less than 8mm thickness. I think this might 
deform or snap over time, especially if you are a heavy rider and drive over 
bumbs.

In general, M10 rod ends might hold well enough. I had M12 myself, but for my 
next project I would even use M14 (although I use the trike for heavy duty with 
a trailer). My cheap M12 rod ends did get some play over time. The more 
expensive ones I installed later, did not.

What kind of rod ends will you be using? I checked the Askubol website and they 
seem to be decent, but in general the 'cheaper' ones will have more play after 
some time than the better quality (for example with a teflon liner). If your 
rod ends will have play over time, 5cm distance between the rod end will have a 
more noticable effect than for example 10cm. But I doubt whether this is 
annoying or will affect steering. I never noticed anything.

The thread of the rod ends are longer and thicker dan in your drawings. You 
might shorten them, but I would not (the inner part is corrosive).

In my experience, the distance between the rod ends and size of the object 
inbetween them, needs to be quite exact. For example: if the distance between 
the faces of your rod ends is 51mm and your object (steel tube) is 50, then you 
will possibly lock the whole steering pivot or give it too much friction for 
easy steering. Do you have a milling machine / lathe for making the parts?

Another note: although you use rod ends, your design does not allow for pivot 
angle adjustments.


Kind greetings,

Patrick


________________________________
Van: python-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:python-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
<python-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:python-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>> namens Howard 
Stevens <hstevens94@xxxxxxxxx<mailto:hstevens94@xxxxxxxxx>>
Verzonden: woensdag 3 januari 2018 08:30
Aan: python@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:python@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Onderwerp: [python] Re: python Digest V15 #19

Having trouble getting my post accepted so have reduced the size of my 
attachment.  Any comments on the effectiveness of a pivot joint like this?
[https://ssl.gstatic.com/ui/v1/icons/mail/images/cleardot.gif]In particular is ;
it possible to have just 50mm between rod ends?  I need to make the front 
section fold into the frame of the seat and so want the pivot joint to be able 
to rotate on the front bar of the seat.  Hope you ca understand the idea.

On Mon, Jan 1, 2018 at 4:06 PM, FreeLists Mailing List Manager 
<ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx><mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>>>
 wrote:
python Digest   Sun, 31 Dec 2017        Volume: 15  Issue: 019

In This Issue:
                [python] Re: python Digest V15 #17
                [python] Re: python Digest V15 #17

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Howard Stevens 
<hstevens94@xxxxxxxxx<mailto:hstevens94@xxxxxxxxx><mailto:hstevens94@xxxxxxxxx<mailto:hstevens94@xxxxxxxxx>>>
Date: Sun, 31 Dec 2017 16:24:15 +1000
Subject: [python] Re: python Digest V15 #17

Hullo Pythonauts,
Happy New Year from Australia.  I am making a new light weight travelling
trike and am interested in any comments/advice you can give me.
Because my trikes must fold, the pivot joint is a little in  front of the
hip line which creates a bit more PSI  I found a pivot joint angle of
around 55 degrees settled this with minimal flop. However if my new joint
is feasible I think I might be able to improve on this.  My main concern is
how to make it strong enough and whether the rod end separation of about
50mm will work.  Comments please!   I posted more detailed drawings but
they must have been too big and my post didn't appear!  Hope this one will!
Howard Stevens
On Wed, Dec 6, 2017 at 4:06 PM, FreeLists Mailing List Manager <
ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx><mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>>>
 wrote:

python Digest   Tue, 05 Dec 2017        Volume: 15  Issue: 017

In This Issue:
                [python] Re: Velomobile development drawings: Part 4

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Kenneth Stewart 
<kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx><mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx>>>
Subject: [python] Re: Velomobile development drawings: Part 4
Date: Tue, 5 Dec 2017 13:15:55 +0000

Hi Darin,
You are right the trike tilts as you turn, it's not designed as tilt
steer it's only a side effect.

The main point of a tilting trike is to try and keep narrow and light
wheels in line with forces.

A few years ago I looked building a motorised tilting trike, and the I
came across a guy in Australia who had built one, got it certified and
registered and couldn't keep it out of the ditches.
The control of steering and tilting together was too much in unplanned
road conditions. I went off the idea shortly afterwards.

Kenny


On 5 Dec 2017, at 05:05, Darin Wick wrote:

If I understand the renderings correctly, it's a tadpole trike where
the crank-seat-rearwheel assembly tilts, and the pivot is set up so
that tilting causes the front axle (sort of a cart axle that runs all
the way across with the wheels fixed to either end) to turn in the
direction of the lean.  Or, conversely, the trike has to lean into the
corner as you turn.

I knew someone with a similar trike - a tadpole with the front cross
set up to pivot at an angle so it would lean as it turned.  It was,
effectively, a tilt-steer trike.  I don't have photos, but you can see
a couple pictures of something very similar here: http://tiltingvehicles.
blogspot.com/2010/07/zepher-tilt-steer-tadpole.html<http://blogspot.com/2010/07/zepher-tilt-steer-tadpole.html><http://blogspot.com/2010/07/zepher-tilt-steer-tadpole.html>

It was simple, elegant, and great fun to ride, but had two major
problems:
1) the ratio of tilt to steer was fixed by the pivot angle, so it only
worked well within a certain range of speeds
2) on crowned roads (or any other uneven surface) the rider had to
keep the seat perpendicular to the surface to go straight, which meant
leaning at an odd angle

He concluded that, if at all possible, you should keep the tilting and
steering mechanisms independent.

-Darin

---- On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 12:19:13 -0800 Kenneth Stewart <
kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx><mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx>>
 > wrote ----

Hi Jurgen,

I am aware of tilting trikes with lean steer, but my design does not
work like that.

The front axle is rigid, there is no Ackerman steering, the wheels do
not pivot. The axle pivots at 65 degrees to horizontal at the front of
the body.

The body, chassis, transmission, seat, and rear wheel are one unit

As the front axle is turned the body leans by means of the geometry
into the bend. There are no extra levers to control the lean.


Regards

Ken


On 4 Dec 2017, at 19:45, J黵gen Mages wrote:

Thanks Ken, this makes the steering principle more clearer to me. The
design reminds me of Greg Kolodziejzyk's lean steer trike (see similar
concept in the attached gif).

The steering pivot seems to be behind the rider and the rider plus the
whole front part is one single unit that tilts - correct?

If so I would consider it to be rearwheel steered (RWS) and not python-
ish ;-)

Regards,
J黵gen.


On 04.12.2017 19:40, Kenneth Stewart wrote:
 > Hi Jurgen,
 >
 > I have just published the section concerning Python geometry on my
 > website. Please have a look and see if it makes sense.
 >
 > Regards
 >
 > Ken Stewart
 >
 > http://kenstewartartist.com/
 >
 >
 >

<4barslinkage.gif>






============================================================

This is the Python Mailinglist

http://www.freelists.org/list/python

Listmaster: Jurgen Mages 
jmages@xxxxxx<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx><mailto:jmages@xxxxxx<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx>>

To unsubscribe send an empty mail to
python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx><mailto:python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>>
with 'unsubscribe' in the subject field.

============================================================











------------------------------

End of python Digest V15 #17
****************************





------------------------------

Subject: [python] Re: python Digest V15 #17
From: =?UTF-8?Q?J眉rgen_Mages?= 
<jmages@xxxxxx<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx><mailto:jmages@xxxxxx<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx>>>
Date: Sun, 31 Dec 2017 11:39:35 +0100

Hi Howard - happy new year to you! Unfortunately, here we are still
stuck in 2017 ;-)

It is always a pleasure to hear from your new projects. A more detailled
answer will follow soon ...

If you agree, I will update your Python wiki project page:

http://en.openbike.org/wiki/Python_Trikes#Howard_Stevens_Mk3.2C_Australia

Best regards,
J黵gen.


On 31.12.2017 07:24, Howard Stevens wrote:
Hullo Pythonauts,
Happy New Year from Australia.  I am making a new light weight
travelling trike and am interested in any comments/advice you can give me.
Because my trikes must fold, the pivot joint is a little in  front of
the hip line which creates a bit more PSI  I found a pivot joint angle
of around 55 degrees settled this with minimal flop. However if my new
joint is feasible I think I might be able to improve on this.  My main
concern is how to make it strong enough and whether the rod end
separation of about 50mm will work.  Comments please!   I posted more
detailed drawings but they must have been too big and my post didn't
appear!  Hope this one will!
Howard Stevens

On Wed, Dec 6, 2017 at 4:06 PM, FreeLists Mailing List Manager
<ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx><mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>>
 
<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx><mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>>>>
 wrote:

    python Digest   Tue, 05 Dec 2017        Volume: 15  Issue: 017

    In This Issue:
                    [python] Re: Velomobile development drawings: Part 4

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    From: Kenneth Stewart 
<kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx><mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx>>
    
<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx><mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx>>>>
    Subject: [python] Re: Velomobile development drawings: Part 4
    Date: Tue, 5 Dec 2017 13:15:55 +0000

    Hi Darin,
    You are right the trike tilts as you turn, it's not designed as tilt
    steer it's only a side effect.

    The main point of a tilting trike is to try and keep narrow and light
    wheels in line with forces.

    A few years ago I looked building a motorised tilting trike, and the I
    came across a guy in Australia who had built one, got it certified and
    registered and couldn't keep it out of the ditches.
    The control of steering and tilting together was too much in unplanned
    road conditions. I went off the idea shortly afterwards.

    Kenny


    On 5 Dec 2017, at 05:05, Darin Wick wrote:

    If I understand the renderings correctly, it's a tadpole trike where
    the crank-seat-rearwheel assembly tilts, and the pivot is set up so
    that tilting causes the front axle (sort of a cart axle that runs all
    the way across with the wheels fixed to either end) to turn in the
    direction of the lean.  Or, conversely, the trike has to lean into the
    corner as you turn.

    I knew someone with a similar trike - a tadpole with the front cross
    set up to pivot at an angle so it would lean as it turned.  It was,
    effectively, a tilt-steer trike.  I don't have photos, but you can see
    a couple pictures of something very similar here:
    http://tiltingvehicles.blogspot.com/2010/07/zepher-tilt-steer-tadpole.html
    
<http://tiltingvehicles.blogspot.com/2010/07/zepher-tilt-steer-tadpole.html>

    It was simple, elegant, and great fun to ride, but had two major
    problems:
    1) the ratio of tilt to steer was fixed by the pivot angle, so it only
    worked well within a certain range of speeds
    2) on crowned roads (or any other uneven surface) the rider had to
    keep the seat perpendicular to the surface to go straight, which meant
    leaning at an odd angle

    He concluded that, if at all possible, you should keep the tilting and
    steering mechanisms independent.

    -Darin

    ---- On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 12:19:13 -0800 Kenneth Stewart
    
<kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx><mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx>>
 
<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx><mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx>>>
     > wrote ----

    Hi Jurgen,

    I am aware of tilting trikes with lean steer, but my design does not
    work like that.

    The front axle is rigid, there is no Ackerman steering, the wheels do
    not pivot. The axle pivots at 65 degrees to horizontal at the front of
    the body.

    The body, chassis, transmission, seat, and rear wheel are one unit

    As the front axle is turned the body leans by means of the geometry
    into the bend. There are no extra levers to control the lean.


    Regards

    Ken


    On 4 Dec 2017, at 19:45, J黵gen Mages wrote:

    Thanks Ken, this makes the steering principle more clearer to me. The
    design reminds me of Greg Kolodziejzyk's lean steer trike (see similar
    concept in the attached gif).

    The steering pivot seems to be behind the rider and the rider plus the
    whole front part is one single unit that tilts - correct?

    If so I would consider it to be rearwheel steered (RWS) and not python-
    ish ;-)

    Regards,
    J黵gen.


    On 04.12.2017 19:40, Kenneth Stewart wrote:
     > Hi Jurgen,
     >
     > I have just published the section concerning Python geometry on my
     > website. Please have a look and see if it makes sense.
     >
     > Regards
     >
     > Ken Stewart
     >
     > http://kenstewartartist.com/
     >
     >
     >

    <4barslinkage.gif>






    ============================================================

    This is the Python Mailinglist

    http://www.freelists.org/list/python
    <http://www.freelists.org/list/python>

    Listmaster: Jurgen Mages 
jmages@xxxxxx<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx><mailto:jmages@xxxxxx<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx>>
 
<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx><mailto:jmages@xxxxxx<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx>>>

    To unsubscribe send an empty mail to
    
python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx><mailto:python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>>
 
<mailto:python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx><mailto:python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>>>
    with 'unsubscribe' in the subject field.

    ============================================================











    ------------------------------

    End of python Digest V15 #17
    ****************************




------------------------------

End of python Digest V15 #19
****************************




------------------------------

Date: Wed, 03 Jan 2018 17:12:36 +0000
From: Dirk Steuwer <dirk@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:dirk@xxxxxxxxxx>>
Subject: [python] Re: python Digest V15 #19

Hello Howard and Happy new Year everyone,

if i understand correctly, you created a "double pivot", where the
folding side seems way thinner compared to the tilting one. I'm
especially not sure if the locking screw that prevents the folding is
strong enough unless the main bolt is tightened and stays tight all
the time.
Maybe that screw could could sit on the outside in parallel to the
main bolt? this way it would act with greater distance...

greetings,
DirkS

Zitat von Howard Stevens <hstevens94@xxxxxxxxx<mailto:hstevens94@xxxxxxxxx>>:

Having trouble getting my post accepted so have reduced the size of my
attachment.  Any comments on the effectiveness of a pivot joint like this?
In particular is it possible to have just 50mm between rod ends?  I need to
make the front section fold into the frame of the seat and so want the
pivot joint to be able to rotate on the front bar of the seat.  Hope you ca
understand the idea.

On Mon, Jan 1, 2018 at 4:06 PM, FreeLists Mailing List Manager <
ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>> wrote:

python Digest   Sun, 31 Dec 2017        Volume: 15  Issue: 019

In This Issue:
                [python] Re: python Digest V15 #17
                [python] Re: python Digest V15 #17

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Howard Stevens <hstevens94@xxxxxxxxx<mailto:hstevens94@xxxxxxxxx>>
Date: Sun, 31 Dec 2017 16:24:15 +1000
Subject: [python] Re: python Digest V15 #17

Hullo Pythonauts,
Happy New Year from Australia.  I am making a new light weight travelling
trike and am interested in any comments/advice you can give me.
Because my trikes must fold, the pivot joint is a little in  front of the
hip line which creates a bit more PSI  I found a pivot joint angle of
around 55 degrees settled this with minimal flop. However if my new joint
is feasible I think I might be able to improve on this.  My main concern is
how to make it strong enough and whether the rod end separation of about
50mm will work.  Comments please!   I posted more detailed drawings but
they must have been too big and my post didn't appear!  Hope this one will!
Howard Stevens
On Wed, Dec 6, 2017 at 4:06 PM, FreeLists Mailing List Manager <
ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>> wrote:

python Digest   Tue, 05 Dec 2017        Volume: 15  Issue: 017

In This Issue:
                [python] Re: Velomobile development drawings: Part 4

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Kenneth Stewart 
<kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx>>
Subject: [python] Re: Velomobile development drawings: Part 4
Date: Tue, 5 Dec 2017 13:15:55 +0000

Hi Darin,
You are right the trike tilts as you turn, it's not designed as tilt
steer it's only a side effect.

The main point of a tilting trike is to try and keep narrow and light
wheels in line with forces.

A few years ago I looked building a motorised tilting trike, and the I
came across a guy in Australia who had built one, got it certified and
registered and couldn't keep it out of the ditches.
The control of steering and tilting together was too much in unplanned
road conditions. I went off the idea shortly afterwards.

Kenny


On 5 Dec 2017, at 05:05, Darin Wick wrote:

If I understand the renderings correctly, it's a tadpole trike where
the crank-seat-rearwheel assembly tilts, and the pivot is set up so
that tilting causes the front axle (sort of a cart axle that runs all
the way across with the wheels fixed to either end) to turn in the
direction of the lean.  Or, conversely, the trike has to lean into the
corner as you turn.

I knew someone with a similar trike - a tadpole with the front cross
set up to pivot at an angle so it would lean as it turned.  It was,
effectively, a tilt-steer trike.  I don't have photos, but you can see
a couple pictures of something very similar here: http://tiltingvehicles
.
blogspot.com/2010/07/zepher-tilt-steer-tadpole.html<http://blogspot.com/2010/07/zepher-tilt-steer-tadpole.html>

It was simple, elegant, and great fun to ride, but had two major
problems:
1) the ratio of tilt to steer was fixed by the pivot angle, so it only
worked well within a certain range of speeds
2) on crowned roads (or any other uneven surface) the rider had to
keep the seat perpendicular to the surface to go straight, which meant
leaning at an odd angle

He concluded that, if at all possible, you should keep the tilting and
steering mechanisms independent.

-Darin

---- On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 12:19:13 -0800 Kenneth Stewart <
kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx>
 > wrote ----

Hi Jurgen,

I am aware of tilting trikes with lean steer, but my design does not
work like that.

The front axle is rigid, there is no Ackerman steering, the wheels do
not pivot. The axle pivots at 65 degrees to horizontal at the front of
the body.

The body, chassis, transmission, seat, and rear wheel are one unit

As the front axle is turned the body leans by means of the geometry
into the bend. There are no extra levers to control the lean.


Regards

Ken


On 4 Dec 2017, at 19:45, J眉rgen Mages wrote:

Thanks Ken, this makes the steering principle more clearer to me. The
design reminds me of Greg Kolodziejzyk's lean steer trike (see similar
concept in the attached gif).

The steering pivot seems to be behind the rider and the rider plus the
whole front part is one single unit that tilts - correct?

If so I would consider it to be rearwheel steered (RWS) and not python-
ish ;-)

Regards,
J眉rgen.


On 04.12.2017 19:40, Kenneth Stewart wrote:
 > Hi Jurgen,
 >
 > I have just published the section concerning Python geometry on my
 > website. Please have a look and see if it makes sense.
 >
 > Regards
 >
 > Ken Stewart
 >
 > http://kenstewartartist.com/
 >
 >
 >

<4barslinkage.gif>






============================================================

This is the Python Mailinglist

http://www.freelists.org/list/python

Listmaster: Jurgen Mages jmages@xxxxxx<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx>

To unsubscribe send an empty mail to
python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
with 'unsubscribe' in the subject field.

============================================================











------------------------------

End of python Digest V15 #17
****************************





------------------------------

Subject: [python] Re: python Digest V15 #17
From: =?UTF-8?Q?J=c3=bcrgen_Mages?= <jmages@xxxxxx<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx>>
Date: Sun, 31 Dec 2017 11:39:35 +0100

Hi Howard - happy new year to you! Unfortunately, here we are still
stuck in 2017 ;-)

It is always a pleasure to hear from your new projects. A more detailled
answer will follow soon ...

If you agree, I will update your Python wiki project page:

http://en.openbike.org/wiki/Python_Trikes#Howard_Stevens_Mk3.2C_Australia

Best regards,
J眉rgen.


On 31.12.2017 07:24, Howard Stevens wrote:
Hullo Pythonauts,
Happy New Year from Australia.  I am making a new light weight
travelling trike and am interested in any comments/advice you can give
me.
Because my trikes must fold, the pivot joint is a little in  front of
the hip line which creates a bit more PSI  I found a pivot joint angle
of around 55 degrees settled this with minimal flop. However if my new
joint is feasible I think I might be able to improve on this.  My main
concern is how to make it strong enough and whether the rod end
separation of about 50mm will work.  Comments please!   I posted more
detailed drawings but they must have been too big and my post didn't
appear!  Hope this one will!
Howard Stevens

On Wed, Dec 6, 2017 at 4:06 PM, FreeLists Mailing List Manager
<ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:ecartis@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>>> wrote:

    python Digest   Tue, 05 Dec 2017        Volume: 15  Issue: 017

    In This Issue:
                    [python] Re: Velomobile development drawings: Part 4

    ------------------------------------------------------------
----------

    From: Kenneth Stewart 
<kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx>
    <mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx>>>
    Subject: [python] Re: Velomobile development drawings: Part 4
    Date: Tue, 5 Dec 2017 13:15:55 +0000

    Hi Darin,
    You are right the trike tilts as you turn, it's not designed as tilt
    steer it's only a side effect.

    The main point of a tilting trike is to try and keep narrow and light
    wheels in line with forces.

    A few years ago I looked building a motorised tilting trike, and the
I
    came across a guy in Australia who had built one, got it certified
and
    registered and couldn't keep it out of the ditches.
    The control of steering and tilting together was too much in
unplanned
    road conditions. I went off the idea shortly afterwards.

    Kenny


    On 5 Dec 2017, at 05:05, Darin Wick wrote:

    If I understand the renderings correctly, it's a tadpole trike where
    the crank-seat-rearwheel assembly tilts, and the pivot is set up so
    that tilting causes the front axle (sort of a cart axle that runs all
    the way across with the wheels fixed to either end) to turn in the
    direction of the lean.  Or, conversely, the trike has to lean into
the
    corner as you turn.

    I knew someone with a similar trike - a tadpole with the front cross
    set up to pivot at an angle so it would lean as it turned.  It was,
    effectively, a tilt-steer trike.  I don't have photos, but you can
see
    a couple pictures of something very similar here:
    http://tiltingvehicles.blogspot.com/2010/07/zepher-
tilt-steer-tadpole.html
    <http://tiltingvehicles.blogspot.com/2010/07/zepher-
tilt-steer-tadpole.html>

    It was simple, elegant, and great fun to ride, but had two major
    problems:
    1) the ratio of tilt to steer was fixed by the pivot angle, so it
only
    worked well within a certain range of speeds
    2) on crowned roads (or any other uneven surface) the rider had to
    keep the seat perpendicular to the surface to go straight, which
meant
    leaning at an odd angle

    He concluded that, if at all possible, you should keep the tilting
and
    steering mechanisms independent.

    -Darin

    ---- On Mon, 04 Dec 2017 12:19:13 -0800 Kenneth Stewart
    <kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx
<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx<mailto:kenny.stewart@xxxxxxxxxx>>
     > wrote ----

    Hi Jurgen,

    I am aware of tilting trikes with lean steer, but my design does not
    work like that.

    The front axle is rigid, there is no Ackerman steering, the wheels do
    not pivot. The axle pivots at 65 degrees to horizontal at the front
of
    the body.

    The body, chassis, transmission, seat, and rear wheel are one unit

    As the front axle is turned the body leans by means of the geometry
    into the bend. There are no extra levers to control the lean.


    Regards

    Ken


    On 4 Dec 2017, at 19:45, J眉rgen Mages wrote:

    Thanks Ken, this makes the steering principle more clearer to me. The
    design reminds me of Greg Kolodziejzyk's lean steer trike (see
similar
    concept in the attached gif).

    The steering pivot seems to be behind the rider and the rider plus
the
    whole front part is one single unit that tilts - correct?

    If so I would consider it to be rearwheel steered (RWS) and not
python-
    ish ;-)

    Regards,
    J眉rgen.


    On 04.12.2017 19:40, Kenneth Stewart wrote:
     > Hi Jurgen,
     >
     > I have just published the section concerning Python geometry on my
     > website. Please have a look and see if it makes sense.
     >
     > Regards
     >
     > Ken Stewart
     >
     > http://kenstewartartist.com/
     >
     >
     >

    <4barslinkage.gif>






    ============================================================

    This is the Python Mailinglist

    http://www.freelists.org/list/python
    <http://www.freelists.org/list/python>

    Listmaster: Jurgen Mages jmages@xxxxxx<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx
<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx<mailto:jmages@xxxxxx>>

    To unsubscribe send an empty mail to
    python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
<mailto:python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:python-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>>
    with 'unsubscribe' in the subject field.

    ============================================================











    ------------------------------

    End of python Digest V15 #17
    ****************************




------------------------------

End of python Digest V15 #19
****************************






------------------------------

From: Steffen R <big.skangster@xxxxxxxxx<mailto:big.skangster@xxxxxxxxx>>
Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2018 22:46:10 +0100
Subject: [python] Re: python Digest V15 #19

Happy New Year everyone and especially to you Howard!
Patrick and Dirk are obviously the same opinion about the hinge. I thought
about the front folding into the back and had the idea to use a middle part
with a hirth locking which is clamped between the tubes coming from the
side. The middle part then offers the stump axles for your pivot. But this
idea still lacks a proper solution for your front part has to be twisted.
And on top it's maybe to heavy. So that's all for now.
Cheers,
Steffen



------------------------------

End of python Digest V16 #1
***************************



Other related posts: