[python] Re: Seat back fixing

  • From: Christian Winkgen <christian.winkgen@xxxxxxx>
  • To: python@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Wed, 11 Apr 2018 08:30:36 +0200

Hi Karl,

the bike looks very nicely done.
Glueing the hub to the frame is a very pragmatic approach. 
Even if the bike is eaten up by corrosion one day - this junction will still be 
there! ;-)

I like the simplicity of the seat and also that it could fold so easily if 
needed.
Anyway - the frame builder who built my bike (unfortunately I did not have the 
balls to do it myself - it would have been another unfinished project) advised 
against such a solution because he thinks it is not comfortable.
So how do you feel in it?
Instead of the safety belt one could also try old fire hose - you even get 
really wide one or cut the smaller ones open lengthwise and double the width.

If it gets wet you probably need a back fender. I was sprayed with mud the 
other week when I practiced without proper mudguards.

The last two days I practiced some slalom in the driveway and also going faster 
on the road (the ones with the light traffic).
And I will definitively go for a longer ride along our nearest river this week 
- but I will get there by car.
Also ordered a reflective flag, bell, lights, reflectors and stuff to be a 
roadworthy Python soon.

And I experience the same with crashes with foreign people around.

Somehow learning to ride a Python is like having an invisible friend:
As soon as a stranger is present, it suddenly disappears.

Cheers,
Christian

Am 09.04.2018 um 22:05 schrieb Karl McCracken <karl.mccracken@xxxxxxxxxxx>:

Hi -
Thought I'd share some photos.. 
https://photos.app.goo.gl/IYxGD3HaqGmGsx4o2 ;
<https://photos.app.goo.gl/IYxGD3HaqGmGsx4o2>

My Python is pretty much exactly to Jurgen's instructions, including the use 
if a 20" fork for the seat back. Unfortunately, when we were welding the hub 
for this to the main frame, it all got a bit enthusiastic and the axle ended 
up being welded in. This meant that the seat back didn't really move, and the 
nuts on the end kept coming loose.

So this weekend I replaced it, but in a way that guaranteed I wouldn't make 
the same mistake again. I cut the flange off the new hub, and then roughened 
its whole surface. I glued it in place with some basic quick setting epoxy. 
Then I filled in gaps & created a smooth overall shape with epoxy putty. 
Finally, the whole thing was wrapped in several layers of  carbon fibre 
ribbon, wetted with a structural epoxy and over-wrapped with PVC tape to 
compress it while curing.

This method can be used in place of welding in most situations. Things to 
note though: make sure the all surfaces are roughened. For joining 
non-stainless steel, apply a thin layer of epoxy as an insulator; if bonding 
aluminium, start with a layer of glass fibre. These metals will otherwise be 
susceptible to galvanic corrosion. Wear gloves, and be very cautious of any 
loose snips of carbon fibres - it's nasty stuff for penetrating skin!

This evening was my first ride out beyond our back lane. 5km along the sea 
front, with only a few falls - always in front of very concerned / helpful 
pedestrians. The problem I need to overcome is my cycling muscle memory - 
every time I reach for the brakes it all goes very wrong. :0/ Oh well... 
Practice. Practice.  Practice! 

Karl.

Get Outlook for Android <https://aka.ms/ghei36>

Other related posts: