[prssr-devel-ml] Re: pRSSreader 1.3.2 ml1

  • From: "Marco@Home" <marco@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <prssr-devel-ml@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Thu, 20 Jul 2006 07:22:05 +0200

Hal:
> I just tried and if you fiddle around just above the menu text you can
> find a clickable region.  Definitely UPX related though.  Did you try
> the don't compress icons option?  I can't look it up right now, the
> UPX docs are non-existent and I don't have upx.exe on this system.

Just unzipped 2.01 and the manual says:

        DOS/Windows:   set UPX=-9 --compress-icons#0

Just in case you want to read all:

NAME
    upx - compress or expand executable files

SYNOPSIS
    upx [ *command* ] [ *options* ] *filename*...

ABSTRACT
                        The Ultimate Packer for eXecutables
       Copyright (c) 1996-2006 Markus Oberhumer, Laszlo Molnar & John Reiser
                            http://upx.sourceforge.net/

    UPX is a portable, extendable, high-performance executable packer for
    several different executable formats. It achieves an excellent
    compression ratio and offers **very** fast decompression. Your
    executables suffer no memory overhead or other drawbacks for most of the
    formats supported, because of in-place decompression.

    While you may use UPX freely for both non-commercial and commercial
    executables (for details see the file LICENSE), we would highly
    appreciate if you credit UPX and ourselves in the documentation,
    possibly including a reference to the UPX home page. Thanks.

    [ Using UPX in non-OpenSource applications without proper credits is
    considered not politically correct ;-) ]

DISCLAIMER
    UPX comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY; for details see the file LICENSE.

    This is the first production quality release, and we plan that future
    1.xx releases will be backward compatible with this version.

    Please report all problems or suggestions to the authors. Thanks.

DESCRIPTION
    UPX is a versatile executable packer with the following features:

      - excellent compression ratio: compresses better than zip/gzip,
          use UPX to decrease the size of your distribution !

      - very fast decompression: about 10 MB/sec on an ancient Pentium 133,
          about 200 MB/sec on an Athlon XP 2000+.

      - no memory overhead for your compressed executables for most of the
          supported formats

      - safe: you can list, test and unpack your executables
          Also, a checksum of both the compressed and uncompressed file is
          maintained internally.

      - universal: UPX can pack a number of executable formats:
          * atari/tos
          * bvmlinuz/386    [bootable Linux kernel]
          * djgpp2/coff
          * dos/com
          * dos/exe
          * dos/sys
          * linux/386
          * linux/elf386
          * linux/sh386
          * ps1/exe
          * rtm32/pe
          * tmt/adam
          * vmlinuz/386     [bootable Linux kernel]
          * vmlinux/386
          * watcom/le (supporting DOS4G, PMODE/W, DOS32a and CauseWay)
          * win32/pe (exe and dll)
          * arm/pe (exe and dll)
          * linux/elfamd64
          * linux/elfppc32
          * mach/elfppc32

      - portable: UPX is written in portable endian-neutral C++

      - extendable: because of the class layout it's very easy to support
          new executable formats or add new compression algorithms

      - free: UPX can be distributed and used freely. And from version 0.99
          the full source code of UPX is released under the GNU General
Public
          License (GPL) !

    You probably understand now why we call UPX the "*ultimate*" executable
    packer.

COMMANDS
  Compress
    This is the default operation, eg. upx yourfile.exe will compress the
    file specified on the command line.

  Decompress
    All UPX supported file formats can be unpacked using the -d switch, eg.
    upx -d yourfile.exe will uncompress the file you've just compressed.

  Test
    The -t command tests the integrity of the compressed and uncompressed
    data, eg. upx -t yourfile.exe check whether your file can be safely
    decompressed. Note, that this command doesn't check the whole file, only
    the part that will be uncompressed during program execution. This means
    that you should not use this command instead of a virus checker.

  List
    The -l command prints out some information about the compressed files
    specified on the command line as parameters, eg upx -l yourfile.exe
    shows the compressed / uncompressed size and the compression ratio of
    *yourfile.exe*.

OPTIONS
    -q: be quiet, suppress warnings

    -q -q (or -qq): be very quiet, suppress errors

    -q -q -q (or -qqq): produce no output at all

    --help: prints the help

    --version: print the version of UPX

    [ ...to be written... - type `upx --help' for now ]

COMPRESSION LEVELS & TUNING
    UPX offers ten different compression levels from -1 to -9, and --best.
    The default compression level is -8 for files smaller than 512 kB, and
    -7 otherwise.

    *   Compression levels 1, 2 and 3 are pretty fast.

    *   Compression levels 4, 5 and 6 achieve a good time/ratio performance.

    *   Compression levels 7, 8 and 9 favor compression ratio over speed.

    *   Compression level --best may take a long time.

    Note that compression level --best can be somewhat slow for large files,
    but you definitely should use it when releasing a final version of your
    program.

    Quick start for achieving the best compression ratio:

        Try upx --brute myfile.exe.

    Details for achieving the best compression ratio:

    *   Use the compression level --best.

    *   Try one or both of the options --all-methods and --all-filters.

    *   Try the option --crp-ms=NUMBER. This uses more memory during
        compression to achieve a (slightly) better compression ratio.

        NUMBER must be a decimal value from 10000 to 999999, inclusive. The
        default value is 10000 (ten thousand).

    *   Info: the option --brute is an abbrevation for the options --best
        --all-methods --all-filters --crp-ms=999999.

    *   Try if --overlay=strip works.

    *   For win32/pe programs there's --strip-relocs=0. See notes below.

OVERLAY HANDLING OPTIONS
    Info: An "overlay" means auxillary data atached after the logical end of
    an executable, and it often contains application specific data (this is
    a common practice to avoid an extra data file, though it would be better
    to use resource sections).

    UPX handles overlays like many other executable packers do: it simply
    copies the overlay after the compressed image. This works with some
    files, but doesn't work with others, depending on how an application
    actually accesses this overlayed data.

      --overlay=copy    Copy any extra data attached to the file. [DEFAULT]

      --overlay=strip   Strip any overlay from the program instead of
                        copying it. Be warned, this may make the compressed
                        program crash or otherwise unusable.

      --overlay=skip    Refuse to compress any program which has an overlay.

ENVIRONMENT
    The environment variable UPX can hold a set of default options for UPX.
    These options are interpreted first and can be overwritten by explicit
    command line parameters. For example:

        for DOS/Windows:   set UPX=-9 --compress-icons#0
        for sh/ksh/zsh:    UPX="-9 --compress-icons=0"; export UPX
        for csh/tcsh:      setenv UPX "-9 --compress-icons=0"

    Under DOS/Windows you must use '#' instead of '=' when setting the
    environment variable because of a COMMAND.COM limitation.

    Not all of the options are valid in the environment variable - UPX will
    tell you.

    You can explicitly use the --no-env option to ignore the environment
    variable.

NOTES FOR THE SUPPORTED EXECUTABLE FORMATS
  NOTES FOR ATARI/TOS
    This is the executable format used by the Atari ST/TT, a Motorola 68000
    based personal computer which was popular in the late '80s. Support of
    this format is only because of nostalgic feelings of one of the authors
    and serves no practical purpose :-). See http://www.freemint.de for more
    info.

    Packed programs will be byte-identical to the original after
    uncompression. All debug information will be stripped, though.

    Extra options available for this executable format:

      --all-methods       Compress the program several times, using all
                          available compression methods. This may improve
                          the compression ratio in some cases, but usually
                          the default method gives the best results anyway.

  NOTES FOR BVMLINUZ/I386
    Same as vmlinuz/i386.

  NOTES FOR DOS/COM
    Obviously UPX won't work with executables that want to read data from
    themselves (like some commandline utilities that ship with Win95/98/ME).

    Compressed programs only work on a 286+.

    Packed programs will be byte-identical to the original after
    uncompression.

    Maximum uncompressed size: ~65100 bytes.

    Extra options available for this executable format:

      --8086              Create an executable that works on any 8086 CPU.

      --all-methods       Compress the program several times, using all
                          available compression methods. This may improve
                          the compression ratio in some cases, but usually
                          the default method gives the best results anyway.

      --all-filters       Compress the program several times, using all
                          available preprocessing filters. This may improve
                          the compression ratio in some cases, but usually
                          the default filter gives the best results anyway.

  NOTES FOR DOS/EXE
    dos/exe stands for all "normal" 16-bit DOS executables.

    Obviously UPX won't work with executables that want to read data from
    themselves (like some command line utilities that ship with
    Win95/98/ME).

    Compressed programs only work on a 286+.

    Extra options available for this executable format:

      --8086              Create an executable that works on any 8086 CPU.

      --no-reloc          Use no relocation records in the exe header.

      --all-methods       Compress the program several times, using all
                          available compression methods. This may improve
                          the compression ratio in some cases, but usually
                          the default method gives the best results anyway.

  NOTES FOR DOS/SYS
    Compressed programs only work on a 286+.

    Packed programs will be byte-identical to the original after
    uncompression.

    Maximum uncompressed size: ~65350 bytes.

    Extra options available for this executable format:

      --8086              Create an executable that works on any 8086 CPU.

      --all-methods       Compress the program several times, using all
                          available compression methods. This may improve
                          the compression ratio in some cases, but usually
                          the default method gives the best results anyway.

      --all-filters       Compress the program several times, using all
                          available preprocessing filters. This may improve
                          the compression ratio in some cases, but usually
                          the default filter gives the best results anyway.

  NOTES FOR DJGPP2/COFF
    First of all, it is recommended to use UPX *instead* of strip. strip has
    the very bad habit of replacing your stub with its own (outdated)
    version. Additionally UPX corrects a bug/feature in strip v2.8.x: it
    will fix the 4 KByte aligment of the stub.

    UPX includes the full functionality of stubify. This means it will
    automatically stubify your COFF files. Use the option --coff to disable
    this functionality (see below).

    UPX automatically handles Allegro packfiles.

    The DLM format (a rather exotic shared library extension) is not
    supported.

    Packed programs will be byte-identical to the original after
    uncompression. All debug information and trailing garbage will be
    stripped, though.

    Extra options available for this executable format:

      --coff              Produce COFF output instead of EXE. By default
                          UPX keeps your current stub.

      --all-methods       Compress the program several times, using all
                          available compression methods. This may improve
                          the compression ratio in some cases, but usually
                          the default method gives the best results anyway.

      --all-filters       Compress the program several times, using all
                          available preprocessing filters. This may improve
                          the compression ratio in some cases, but usually
                          the default filter gives the best results anyway.

  NOTES FOR LINUX [general]
    Introduction

      Linux/386 support in UPX consists of 3 different executable formats,
      one optimized for ELF excutables ("linux/elf386"), one optimized
      for shell scripts ("linux/sh386"), and one generic format
      ("linux/386").

      We will start with a general discussion first, but please
      also read the relevant docs for each of the individual formats.

      Also, there is special support for bootable kernels - see the
      description of the vmlinuz/386 format.

    General user's overview

      Running a compressed executable program trades less space on a
      ``permanent'' storage medium (such as a hard disk, floppy disk,
      CD-ROM, flash memory, EPROM, etc.) for more space in one or more
      ``temporary'' storage media (such as RAM, swap space, /tmp, etc.).
      Running a compressed executable also requires some additional CPU
      cycles to generate the compressed executable in the first place,
      and to decompress it at each invocation.

      How much space is traded?  It depends on the executable, but many
      programs save 30% to 50% of permanent disk space.  How much CPU
      overhead is there?  Again, it depends on the executable, but
      decompression speed generally is at least many megabytes per second,
      and frequently is limited by the speed of the underlying disk
      or network I/O.

      Depending on the statistics of usage and access, and the relative
      speeds of CPU, RAM, swap space, /tmp, and filesystem storage, then
      invoking and running a compressed executable can be faster than
      directly running the corresponding uncompressed program.
      The operating system might perfrom fewer expensive I/O operations
      to invoke the compressed program.  Paging to or from swap space
      or /tmp might be faster than paging from the general filesystem.
      ``Medium-sized'' programs which access about 1/3 to 1/2 of their
      stored program bytes can do particulary well with compression.
      Small programs tend not to benefit as much because the absolute
      savings is less.  Big programs tend not to benefit proportionally
      because each invocation may use only a small fraction of the program,
      yet UPX decompresses the entire program before invoking it.
      But in environments where disk or flash memory storage is limited,
      then compression may win anyway.

      Currently, executables compressed by UPX do not share RAM at runtime
      in the way that executables mapped from a filesystem do.  As a
      result, if the same program is run simultaneously by more than one
      process, then using the compressed version will require more RAM
and/or
      swap space.  So, shell programs (bash, csh, etc.)  and ``make''
      might not be good candidates for compression.

      UPX recognizes three executable formats for Linux: Linux/elf386,
      Linux/sh386, and Linux/386.  Linux/386 is the most generic format;
      it accommodates any file that can be executed.  At runtime, the UPX
      decompression stub re-creates in /tmp a copy of the original file,
      and then the copy is (re-)executed with the same arguments.
      ELF binary executables prefer the Linux/elf386 format by default,
      because UPX decompresses them directly into RAM, uses only one
      exec, does not use space in /tmp, and does not use /proc.
      Shell scripts where the underlying shell accepts a ``-c'' argument
      can use the Linux/sh386 format.  UPX decompresses the shell script
      into low memory, then maps the shell and passes the entire text of the
      script as an argument with a leading ``-c''.

    General benefits:

      - UPX can compress all executables, be it AOUT, ELF, libc4, libc5,
        libc6, Shell/Perl/Python/... scripts, standalone Java .class
        binaries, or whatever...
        All scripts and programs will work just as before.

      - Compressed programs are completely self-contained. No need for
        any external program.

      - UPX keeps your original program untouched. This means that
        after decompression you will have a byte-identical version,
        and you can use UPX as a file compressor just like gzip.
        [ Note that UPX maintains a checksum of the file internally,
          so it is indeed a reliable alternative. ]

      - As the stub only uses syscalls and isn't linked against libc it
        should run under any Linux configuration that can run ELF
        binaries.

      - For the same reason compressed executables should run under
        FreeBSD and other systems which can run Linux binaries.
        [ Please send feedback on this topic ]

    General drawbacks:

      - It is not advisable to compress programs which usually have many
        instances running (like `sh' or `make') because the common segments
of
        compressed programs won't be shared any longer between different
        processes.

      - `ldd' and `size' won't show anything useful because all they
        see is the statically linked stub.  Since version 0.82 the section
        headers are stripped from the UPX stub and `size' doesn't even
        recognize the file format.  The file patches/patch-elfcode.h has a
        patch to fix this bug in `size' and other programs which use GNU
BFD.

    General notes:

      - As UPX leaves your original program untouched it is advantageous
        to strip it before compression.

      - If you compress a script you will lose platform independence -
        this could be a problem if you are using NFS mounted disks.

      - Compression of suid, guid and sticky-bit programs is rejected
        because of possible security implications.

      - For the same reason there is no sense in making any compressed
        program suid.

      - Obviously UPX won't work with executables that want to read data
        from themselves. E.g., this might be a problem for Perl scripts
        which access their __DATA__ lines.

      - In case of internal errors the stub will abort with exitcode 127.
        Typical reasons for this to happen are that the program has somehow
        been modified after compression.
        Running `strace -o strace.log compressed_file' will tell you more.

  NOTES FOR LINUX/ELF386
    Please read the general Linux description first.

    The linux/elf386 format decompresses directly into RAM, uses only one
    exec, does not use space in /tmp, and does not use /proc.

    Linux/elf386 is automatically selected for Linux ELF exectuables.

    Packed programs will be byte-identical to the original after
    uncompression.

    How it works:

      For ELF executables, UPX decompresses directly to memory, simulating
      the mapping that the operating system kernel uses during exec(),
      including the PT_INTERP program interpreter (if any).
      The brk() is set by a special PT_LOAD segment in the compressed
      executable itself.  UPX then wipes the stack clean except for
      arguments, environment variables, and Elf_auxv entries (this is
      required by bugs in the startup code of /lib/ld-linux.so as of
      May 2000), and transfers control to the program interpreter or
      the e_entry address of the original executable.

      The UPX stub is about 1700 bytes long, partly written in assembler
      and only uses kernel syscalls. It is not linked against any libc.

    Specific drawbacks:

      - For linux/elf386 and linux/sh386 formats, you will be relying on
        RAM and swap space to hold all of the decompressed program during
        the lifetime of the process.  If you already use most of your swap
        space, then you may run out.  A system that is "out of memory"
        can become fragile.  Many programs do not react gracefully when
        malloc() returns 0.  With newer Linux kernels, the kernel
        may decide to kill some processes to regain memory, and you
        may not like the kernel's choice of which to kill.  Running
        /usr/bin/top is one way to check on the usage of swap space.

    Extra options available for this executable format:

      (none)

  NOTES FOR LINUX/SH386
    Please read the general Linux description first.

    Shell scripts where the underling shell accepts a ``-c'' argument can
    use the Linux/sh386 format. UPX decompresses the shell script into low
    memory, then maps the shell and passes the entire text of the script as
    an argument with a leading ``-c''. It does not use space in /tmp, and
    does not use /proc.

    Linux/sh386 is automatically selected for shell scripts that use a known
    shell.

    Packed programs will be byte-identical to the original after
    uncompression.

    How it works:

      For shell script executables (files beginning with "#!/" or "#! /")
      where the shell is known to accept "-c <command>", UPX decompresses
      the file into low memory, then maps the shell (and its PT_INTERP),
      and passes control to the shell with the entire decompressed file
      as the argument after "-c".  Known shells are sh, ash, bash, bsh, csh,
      ksh, tcsh, pdksh.  Restriction: UPX cannot use this method
      for shell scripts which use the one optional string argument after
      the shell name in the script (example: "#! /bin/sh option3\n".)

      The UPX stub is about 1700 bytes long, partly written in assembler
      and only uses kernel syscalls. It is not linked against any libc.

    Specific drawbacks:

      - For linux/elf386 and linux/sh386 formats, you will be relying on
        RAM and swap space to hold all of the decompressed program during
        the lifetime of the process.  If you already use most of your swap
        space, then you may run out.  A system that is "out of memory"
        can become fragile.  Many programs do not react gracefully when
        malloc() returns 0.  With newer Linux kernels, the kernel
        may decide to kill some processes to regain memory, and you
        may not like the kernel's choice of which to kill.  Running
        /usr/bin/top is one way to check on the usage of swap space.

    Extra options available for this executable format:

      (none)

  NOTES FOR LINUX/386
    Please read the general Linux description first.

    The generic linux/386 format decompresses to /tmp and needs /proc
    filesystem support. It starts the decompressed program via the execve()
    syscall.

    Linux/386 is only selected if the specialized linux/elf386 and
    linux/sh386 won't recognize a file.

    Packed programs will be byte-identical to the original after
    uncompression.

    How it works:

      For files which are not ELF and not a script for a known "-c" shell,
      UPX uses kernel execve(), which first requires decompressing to a
      temporary file in the filesystem.  Interestingly -
      because of the good memory management of the Linux kernel - this
      often does not introduce a noticable delay, and in fact there
      will be no disk access at all if you have enough free memory as
      the entire process takes places within the filesystem buffers.

      A compressed executable consists of the UPX stub and an overlay
      which contains the original program in a compressed form.

      The UPX stub is a statically linked ELF executable and does
      the following at program startup:

        1) decompress the overlay to a temporary location in /tmp
        2) open the temporary file for reading
        3) try to delete the temporary file and start (execve)
           the uncompressed program in /tmp using /proc/<pid>/fd/X as
           attained by step 2)
        4) if that fails, fork off a subprocess to clean up and
           start the program in /tmp in the meantime

      The UPX stub is about 1700 bytes long, partly written in assembler
      and only uses kernel syscalls. It is not linked against any libc.

    Specific drawbacks:

      - You need additional free disk space for the uncompressed program
        in your /tmp directory. This program is deleted immediately after
        decompression, but you still need it for the full execution time
        of the program.

      - You must have /proc filesystem support as the stub wants to open
        /proc/<pid>/exe and needs /proc/<pid>/fd/X. This also means that you
        cannot compress programs that are used during the boot sequence
        before /proc is mounted.

      - Utilities like `top' will display numerical values in the process
        name field. This is because Linux computes the process name from
        the first argument of the last execve syscall (which is typically
        something like /proc/<pid>/fd/3).

      - Because of temporary decompression to disk the decompression speed
        is not as fast as with the other executable formats. Still, I can
see
        no noticable delay when starting programs like my ~3 MB emacs (which
        is less than 1 MB when compressed :-).

    Extra options available for this executable format:

      --force-execve      Force the use of the generic linux/386 "execve"
                          format, i.e. do not try the linux/elf386 and
                          linux/sh386 formats.

  NOTES FOR PS1/EXE
    This is the executable format used by the Sony PlayStation (PSone), a
    Mips R3000 based gaming console which is popular since the late '90s.
    Support of this format is very similar to the Atari one, because of
    nostalgic feelings of one of the authors.

    Packed programs will be byte-identical to the original after
    uncompression, until further notice.

    Maximum uncompressed size: ~1998848 bytes.

    Notes:

      - UPX creates as default a 'CD-Rom only' PS1/PS2 compatible
executable.
        For transfer between client/target use options below.

      - Normally the packed files use the same memory areas like the
uncompressed
        versions, so they will not override other memory areas while
unpacking.
        If this isn't possible UPX will abort showing a 'packed data
overlap'
        error. With the "--force" option UPX will set a few 'bytes higher'
loading
        offset for the packed file, but this isn't a real problem if it is a
        single or boot-only executable.

    Extra options available for this executable format:

      --all-methods       Compress the program several times, using all
                          available compression methods. This may improve
                          the compression ratio in some cases, but usually
                          the default method gives the best results anyway.

      --boot-only         The format will only run from a CD and may
slightly
                          improves the compression ratio. The decompression
                          routines are faster than default ones.
                          But it cannot be used for host/client transfer !

      --no-align          This option disables CD mode 2 data sector format
                          alignment. May slightly improves the compression
ratio,
                          but the compressed executable will not boot from a
CD.
                          Use it for client/target transfer only !

  NOTES FOR RTM32/PE and ARM/PE
    Same as win32/pe.

  NOTES FOR TMT/ADAM
    This format is used by the TMT Pascal compiler - see http://www.tmt.com/
    .

    Extra options available for this executable format:

      --all-methods       Compress the program several times, using all
                          available compression methods. This may improve
                          the compression ratio in some cases, but usually
                          the default method gives the best results anyway.

      --all-filters       Compress the program several times, using all
                          available preprocessing filters. This may improve
                          the compression ratio in some cases, but usually
                          the default filter gives the best results anyway.

  NOTES FOR VMLINUZ/386
    The vmlinuz/386 and bvmlinuz/386 formats take a gzip-compressed bootable
    Linux kernel image ("vmlinuz", "zImage", "bzImage"), gzip-decompress it
    and re-compress it with the UPX compression method.

    vmlinuz/386 is completely unrelated to the other Linux executable
    formats, and it does not share any of their drawbacks.

    Notes:

      - Be sure that "vmlinuz/386" or "bvmlinuz/386" is displayed
      during compression - otherwise a wrong executable format
      may have been used, and the kernel won't boot.

    Benefits:

      - Better compression (but note that the kernel was already compressed,
      so the improvement is not as large as with other formats).
      Still, the bytes saved may be essential for special needs like
      bootdisks.

         For example, this is what I get for my 2.2.16 kernel:
            1589708  vmlinux
             641073  bzImage        [original]
             560755  bzImage.upx    [compressed by "upx -9"]

      - Much faster decompression at kernel boot time (but kernel
        decompression speed is not really an issue these days).

    Drawbacks:

      (none)

    Extra options available for this executable format:

      --all-methods       Compress the program several times, using all
                          available compression methods. This may improve
                          the compression ratio in some cases, but usually
                          the default method gives the best results anyway.

      --all-filters       Compress the program several times, using all
                          available preprocessing filters. This may improve
                          the compression ratio in some cases, but usually
                          the default filter gives the best results anyway.

  NOTES FOR WATCOM/LE
    UPX has been successfully tested with the following extenders: DOS4G,
    DOS4GW, PMODE/W, DOS32a, CauseWay. The WDOS/X extender is partly
    supported (for details see the file bugs BUGS).

    DLLs and the LX format are not supported.

    Extra options available for this executable format:

      --le                Produce an unbound LE output instead of
                          keeping the current stub.

  NOTES FOR WIN32/PE
    The PE support in UPX is quite stable now, but probably there are still
    some incompabilities with some files.

    Because of the way UPX (and other packers for this format) works, you
    can see increased memory usage of your compressed files because the
    whole program is loaded into memory at startup. If you start several
    instances of huge compressed programs you're wasting memory because the
    common segements of the program won't get shared across the instances.
    On the other hand if you're compressing only smaller programs, or
    running only one instance of larger programs, then this penalty is
    smaller, but it's still there.

    If you're running executables from network, then compressed programs
    will load faster, and require less bandwidth during execution.

    DLLs are supported. But UPX compressed DLLs can not share common data
    and code when they got used by multiple applications. So compressing
    msvcrt.dll is a waste of memory, but compressing the dll plugins of a
    particular application may be a better idea.

    Screensavers are supported, with the restriction that the filename must
    end with ".scr" (as screensavers are handled slightly different than
    normal exe files).

    UPX compressed PE files has some minor memory overhead (usually in the
    10 - 30 kbytes range) which can be seen by specifying the "-i" command
    line switch during compression.

    Extra options available for this executable format:

     --compress-exports=0 Don't compress the export section.
                          Use this if you plan to run the compressed
                          program under Wine.
     --compress-exports=1 Compress the export section. [DEFAULT]
                          Compression of the export section can improve the
                          compression ratio quite a bit but may not work
                          with all programs (like winword.exe).
                          UPX never compresses the export section of a DLL
                          regardless of this option.

      --compress-icons=0  Don't compress any icons.
      --compress-icons=1  Compress all but the first icon.
      --compress-icons=2  Compress all icons which are not in the
                          first icon directory. [DEFAULT]

      --compress-resources=0  Don't compress any resources at all.

      --keep-resource=list Don't compress resources specified by the list.
                          The members of the list are separated by commas.
                          A list member has the following format:
I<type[/name]>.
                          I<Type> is the type of the resource. Standard
types
                          must be specified as decimal numbers, user types
can be
                          specified by decimal IDs or strings. I<Name> is
the
                          identifier of the resource. It can be a decimal
number
                          or a string. For example:

                          --keep-resource=2/MYBITMAP,5,6/12345

                          UPX won't compress the named bitmap resource
"MYBITMAP",
                          it leaves every dialog (5) resource uncompressed,
and
                          it won't touch the string table resource with
identifier
                          12345.

      --force             Force compression even when there is an
                          unexpected value in a header field.
                          Use with care.

      --strip-relocs=0    Don't strip relocation records.
      --strip-relocs=1    Strip relocation records. [DEFAULT]
                          This option only works on executables with base
                          address greater or equal to 0x400000. Usually the
                          compressed files becomes smaller, but some files
                          may become larger. Note that the resulting file
will
                          not work under Windows 3.x (Win32s).
                          UPX never strips relocations from a DLL
                          regardless of this option.

      --all-methods       Compress the program several times, using all
                          available compression methods. This may improve
                          the compression ratio in some cases, but usually
                          the default method gives the best results anyway.

      --all-filters       Compress the program several times, using all
                          available preprocessing filters. This may improve
                          the compression ratio in some cases, but usually
                          the default filter gives the best results anyway.

DIAGNOSTICS
    Exit status is normally 0; if an error occurs, exit status is 1. If a
    warning occurs, exit status is 2.

    UPX's diagnostics are intended to be self-explanatory.

BUGS
    Please report all bugs immediately to the authors.

AUTHORS
     Markus F.X.J. Oberhumer <markus@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
     http://www.oberhumer.com

     Laszlo Molnar <ml1050@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>

     John F. Reiser <jreiser@xxxxxxxxxxxx>

     Jens Medoch <jssg@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>

COPYRIGHT
    Copyright (C) 1996-2006 Markus Franz Xaver Johannes Oberhumer

    Copyright (C) 1996-2006 Laszlo Molnar

    Copyright (C) 2000-2006 John F. Reiser

    Copyright (C) 2002-2006 Jens Medoch

    This program may be used freely, and you are welcome to redistribute it
    under certain conditions.

    This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
    WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
    MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the UPX License
    Agreement for more details.

    You should have received a copy of the UPX License Agreement along with
    this program; see the file LICENSE. If not, visit the UPX home page.



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