RE: web accessibility testing

  • From: "Julio C. Perez" <jcperez1@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sat, 13 Oct 2007 07:37:34 -0400

Got it! Thanks for the clarification. It looks like I need to do more
careful reading/processing! 

Sincerely,
Julio C. Perez
?I am only one But still I am one. I cannot do everything, But still I can
do something. And because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the
something that I can do.? 
Edward Everett Hale
jcperez1@xxxxxxxxxxxxx

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Léonie Watson
Sent: Tuesday, October 09, 2007 5:24 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: web accessibility testing

Julio,

        You're right. The W3C's Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG),
from which the 508 checkpoints come, do encourage the use of CSS style
sheets. The idea they're promoting is to completely separate structure from
presentation.

        If you provide a page with good structure through HTML, the idea is
that someone should be able to read that information, whether they have CSS
enabled or not. It might not look as beautiful, but it should still be
accessible in the most pure sense.

        Equally, it is then possible for someone to use their own style
sheet and apply it to a website. This is much more rare, but effectively it
means that nothing in the presentation is hard coded. It can be overridden
by the user or turned off by the user completely.

        You can take this to many different levels. On my site, I have a
style switcher. On the following page you can select a theme for the
website:
http://www.tink.co.uk/content/style_switcher.php
 
        To a screen reader user, the site looks and behaves exactly the same
way, regardless of which theme you choose. This is because a screen reader
pays very little attention to CSS and focuses mainly on the HTML structure
of the page.

        Visually though, the navigation moves to different locations on the
page, the colour scheme changes and other visual effects come into play. The
idea is that because the structure and the presentation are completely
separate, you can provide a visual look and feel most appropriate to your
audience, whilst leaving the HTML structure in tact.  

 
Regards,
Léonie.
 

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Julio C. Perez
Sent: 09 October 2007 12:43
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: web accessibility testing

When you say "style sheets" are you speaking of "cascading style sheets
(CSS)"? If so, why would you want to "stay independent of style sheets". I
thought that the w3c and 508 guidelines promote the use of style sheets. Can
you enlighten me on this matter?

Sincerely,
Julio C. Perez
Let us be aware of the source of being, common to us all and to all living
things.? 
Thich Nhat Hanh
jcperez1@xxxxxxxxxxxxx  

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Robbie Miller
Sent: Saturday, October 06, 2007 12:34 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: web accessibility testing

Hello Léonie,
I'll give this tool a try.
Thanks.

Robbie
robbie@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

----- Original Message -----
From: "Léonie Watson" <tink@xxxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Friday, October 05, 2007 4:33 PM
Subject: RE: web accessibility testing


Robbie,

For a foreground/background colour pair to show good contrast, they should
pass tests for colour difference and brightness. The W3C provides two
algorithms for working these out.

Essentially, a colour pair  must return a score of 500 or higher for colour
difference and a score of 125 or higher for brightness. HP propose a
slightly more lenient score of 400 for colour brightness, which is perfectly
acceptable.

There are several online tools you can use to test two colours, providing
you have the hex colour codes. There's one on my site:
http://www.tink.co.uk/content/colour_checker.php

Regards,
Léonie.
-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Robbie Miller
Sent: 05 October 2007 15:01
To: Blind Programming
Subject: web accessibility testing

Hello Listers,
I've been asked to do an accessibility - section 508 evaluation of a web
site.  My question is, how can I test a page to see if it:
1.)    "Remain Independent of Color" and 2.) "Stay Independent of Style
Sheets"?

Are there any tools I can use to do this?
Any help on this would be appreciated.
Also, if there are any resources on web accessibility testing, please let me
know.

Thank you.
Robbie
robbie@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

__________
View the list's information and change your settings at
//www.freelists.org/list/programmingblind


__________
View the list's information and change your settings at
//www.freelists.org/list/programmingblind


__________ NOD32 2574 (20071005) Information __________

This message was checked by NOD32 antivirus system.
http://www.eset.com


__________
View the list's information and change your settings at
//www.freelists.org/list/programmingblind



__________
View the list's information and change your settings at
//www.freelists.org/list/programmingblind


__________
View the list's information and change your settings at 
//www.freelists.org/list/programmingblind



__________
View the list's information and change your settings at
//www.freelists.org/list/programmingblind

Other related posts: