Re: The top three big problems

  • From: "Octavian Rasnita" <orasnita@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sun, 14 Oct 2007 17:12:24 +0300

I think that the program should allow us choosing the hotkeys, but ideally, it shouldn't set by default too many hotkeys.


Why? Because I've seen that many manuals don't tell us to choose a certain option, but to press a certain hotkey. However, maybe that hotkey is redefined immediately after we start using the program, so we don't know why we should press control+F6, or F6, or control+Tab, and so on.

I think that absolutely every option of the program should be accessible by menus, and we should be able to set a hotkey for each of those menu options, and ideally, the manuals or help files shouldn't tell us to click here or there or press a hotkey, but tell us what menu option we need to choose also.

For example, when I read an Eclipse manual, I hear that I can see some things in a certain named pane, or in a certain view, or in a certain perspective, but I don't know how I could reach there. The sighted users just see, but I can't do it without knowing how to reach there.

Octavian

----- Original Message ----- From: "Chris Hofstader" <chris.hofstader@xxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Sunday, October 14, 2007 3:16 PM
Subject: RE: The top three big problems


I agree with Teddy that one should be able to edit the key bindings.  I
would make the defaults as similar to VS as possible but the users should be
allowed to change them to meet their specific needs.  Also, users may need
to change key bindings depending upon various editor plug-ins they may
employ which will have their own set.

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Octavian Rasnita
Sent: Saturday, October 13, 2007 5:21 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: The top three big problems

The best way of remembering the keystrokes is to be able to define your own
keystrokes.

A certain keystroke might be not easy to remember for someone, but maybe for

others it is very easy to remember because it is the same key they've used
in other programs for the same thing.

Octavian

----- Original Message ----- From: "Andreas Stefik" <stefika@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Sunday, October 14, 2007 12:10 AM
Subject: Re: The top three big problems


Do you folks have any ideas as to what would make it easier to
remember all the keystrokes? This type of stuff would be really easy
to add in to my compiler, so suggestions are very welcome!

Andy

On 10/13/07, Andy B <a_borka@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
Good memory I guess... I am in VS2005 almost 50% of the day so have some
experience with it. Did I remember something wrong?



-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Dale Leavens
Sent: Saturday, October 13, 2007 4:27 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: The top three big problems


I want to know how you can possibly remember all those key strokes and
the
sequence.


Dale Leavens, Cochrane Ontario Canada
DLeavens@xxxxxxx
Skype DaleLeavens
Come and meet Aurora, Nakita and Nanook at our polar bear habitat.


----- Original Message -----
From: "Andy B" <a_borka@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Saturday, October 13, 2007 2:04 PM
Subject: RE: The top three big problems


The below is easily possible in vs2005 at least. If you go into the
settings, under bu8ild options somewhere (I forgot exactly since I
haven't
been there in a long time), there is a choice to allow the compiler to
show
the error list/window upon build/compile failure. When you are in this
list,
hitting enter on a error message actually instantly jumps you to the code
line where the error is and highlights it in a certain color. I know the
color doesn't help a total blind person, but at least jaws jumps to the
exact line being complained about. All you have to do now is hide the
error
window (alt shift h), fix the line of code and then press f5/control
f5/f6
to rebuild again...




2. The usability.

A programming environment should be made  thinking to the blind
programmers
needs also, and a blind programmer should be able to configure the
environment as he wants.

For example, what does a sighted programmer after he runs a program in
Eclipse or VS.net and it gives an error?
I think that he looks too se what was the error.
So, for the sighted programmer is easy to take a look in the wanted pane,
but a blind programmer should be able to configure the application so
after
it runs the program and gives the error, the focus to be automaticly
placed
in the errors pane. And he should be able to move the focus to the code
pane

immediately.

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