[OGD] Re: orchids Digest V3 #19

  • From: Paul Johnson <orchids@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: orchids@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Wed, 20 Jan 2010 07:58:29 -0600

The original story probably came from a naïve cubicle journalist; of  
course it is "crap" in the context given.  However, associations of  
butterflies and orchids were documented ages ago.  There are good  
studies published on heliconiine and hesperiine butterflies on  
Epidendrum radicans in Costa Rica.  Particularly interesting is the  
sharing of pollinators, or co-opting of pollinators, by Asclepias spp.  
that are part of floral mimicry complexes with Epidendrum species; I  
have photos of these from Monteverde archived somewhere on a CD.   
There are also the studies on butterfly pollination in Disa spp.  Not  
a lot of instances of butterfly pollination, but some.  A brief review  
of early studies was done by van der Pijl & Dodson (1969, Orchid  
Flowers:  Their Pollination and Evolution).  Cingel (2001, An Atlas of  
Orchid Pollination...) also covered the issue in detail.




On Jan 20, 2010, at 12:09 AM, orchids@xxxxxxxxxxxxx wrote:

> orchids Digest        Tue, 19 Jan 2010        Volume: 03  Issue: 019
>
> In This Issue:
>               Re: Butterflies
>               at Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden / Belmont, North Carolina
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> From: Oliver Sparrow <director@xxxxxxxxxxx>
> Subject: Re: Butterflies
> Date: Tue, 19 Jan 2010 09:27:06 +0000
>
> Quote:
>
>> BTW, has anyone got a reference to support this "bees and  
>> butterflies" bit,
>> or should I write it off as total unmitigated crap ?
>
> Yes, I was surprised by that, too. Do any butterflies anywhere  
> pollinate
> orchids? Moths, yes, wasps, yes; but putting the 'but' in  
> butterflies, I don't
> know. Darwin did a drawing of a S American species which had evolved  
> its
> pollinia to clasp the tip if a humming bird's beak, so anything is  
> possible.
>
> I was also surprised by another quote, to the effect that only a few  
> orchids
> have dedicated pollinators, the implication being that  
> flippertigibbit insects
> promiscuously bumble around, occasionally doing the necessary for  
> orchids.
> Today a lily, tomorrow a daisy.
>
> This rather flies (ahem) in the face of the evidence. Orchids are  
> unusual in
> lots of ways, but their production of (mostly) huge quantities of  
> (generally)
> dust-fine seed is central to their biology. To get 1-6 million  
> seeds, you have
> to transfer the same number of gametes in the pollen. Orchids do  
> that by
> bundling these into pollinia, which is then a one-shot reproductive  
> gamble.
> Either the pollinium gets to another flower of the same species, or  
> all is
> lost. Dust-pollen flowers, by contrast, dabble every passing bee  
> with yet more
> reproductive chances, admittedly of fewer seeds per ovary.
>
> Consequently, the 'orchid experience' has to imprint the insect  
> deeply, such
> that it seeks out another of the same with all its abilities. That  
> is why (I
> suspect that) orchid flowers are so strikingly structured, and so
> differentiated from each other and from other flowers. The  
> pollinators may not
> be dedicated, in this sense of this species fitting only that  
> flower, but they
> are dedicated the way pop fans are dedicated to their band: once  
> struck,
> forever dizzy while the season lasts.
> ______________________________
>
> Oliver Sparrow
> +44 (0)1628 823187
> www.chforum.org
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 19 Jan 2010 08:41:11 -0500
> From: viateur.boutot@xxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: at Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden / Belmont, North Carolina   
> (US)
>
> "at Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden, it?s orchid season.
> Now through March 14...
> between 1,500 and 2,000 orchids on display  out of the garden?s  
> collection
> of about 5,000 orchids.
> ...
> The event drew about 10,000 folks to the garden last year...
>
> www.dsbg.org.
> ...
> Milton Carpenter, owner of Everglades Orchid of Belle Glade, Fla...
> The results of his orchid breeding have enabled people in warmer  
> climates
> to grow previously cold-preferrent orchids...
>
> Carolina Orchids, a local company specializing in orchid species...
> ...
>
> orchids will be celebrated with needle and thread through... a...  
> quilt
> exhibit...
> a group of seven quilt artists... have worked over the past year to  
> create
> small quilts based on photographs from the Orchid Conservatory at  
> Daniel
> Stowe Botanical Garden."
>
> URL : http://www.gastongazette.com/articles/botanical-42692-daniel-garden.html
>
> *****************
> Regards,
>
> VB
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of orchids Digest V3 #19
> ****************************
>



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