Re: oracle v SS

  • From: "Kellyn Pot'Vin-Gorman" <dbakevlar@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: Noveljic Nenad <nenad.noveljic@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Thu, 7 Nov 2019 16:00:22 -0800

I have to jump in on this one, as there are a few things that need to be
discussed further:

-Always on Availability Groups, (AG) vs. RAC:
Due to OS level clustering well known in the Windows world, the AG product
isn't a clear apples and apples comparison.  They didn't find it productive
for any writes to go back from the replicas to the primary, so AG is more
like Data Guard than RAC.  For the data migrations I do to Azure of Oracle
databases, I will undoubtedly talk them out of RAC, as there's better
solutions and Data Guard rocks in the cloud on VMs with Far Sync, even for
those customers that may correctly be looking at RAC for scalability.

- Another suspicious default in SQL Server is "clustered index" (as opposed
to heap table) as a data storage structure, which is similar to index
organized table (IOT) in Oracle, just the IOTs performs much better because
of the smarter implementation.
SQL Server architecture is different.  Clustered indexes perform very
efficiently vs. an IOT in Oracle, which has a very unique use case, but
there is also less need for memory in the TempDB for sorting due to this
design, (no PGA, either).  Keep in mind, it's again not an apple to apple
comparison when you only take the index structure into consideration.

- Oracle/Linux troubleshooting/performance tuning features are superior!
SQL Server is slowly catching up, but it's still way beyond Oracle.
SQL Server is on Linux, which offers similar optimization tool availability.

- SQL Server comes with BI components (Reporting & Analysis Server, SSIS).
Most newer, advanced, more efficient products are not in SQL Server, but
Azure DB and Azure in general.  Power BI, Analysis Server, Hyperscale,
Azure Data Factory).  It may be less popular in the Oracle world, but I'm
at one of the largest Microsoft conferences today and I can tell you, most
of us have moved to the cloud and cloud products.  SQL Server outside of
Azure is when we have no other choice.  There's so much more available in
Azure.

Thanks, hope this helps!



*Kellyn Pot'Vin-Gorman*
DBAKevlar Blog <http://dbakevlar.com>
President Denver SQL Server User Group <http://denversql.org/>
about.me/dbakevlar



On Thu, Nov 7, 2019 at 1:41 PM Noveljic Nenad <nenad.noveljic@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
wrote:

Hi Orlando,

Both products are high-end - you can't go wrong with either of them. When
making the decision I'd consider not only the cost, but also what know-how
you already have in-house, not only about databases, but OS (including
virtualization) as well. In fact, that might be the most important criteria.

Here are some technical points, which might relevant:

- Readers-blocking-writers mentioned by Mladen is just an awkward default
that can be changed.

- Another suspicious default in SQL Server is "clustered index" (as
opposed to heap table) as a data storage structure, which is similar to
index organized table (IOT) in Oracle, just the IOTs performs much better
because of the smarter implementation.

- PL/SQL is much more sophisticated than TSQL, which might be relevant if
you plan to store your application logic in the database. Actually, TSQL
doesn't scale well when the same code is concurrently executed by multiple
sessions.

- There are also some other scalability issues related to built-in SQL
Server OS Scheduler.

- SQL Server integration with Active Directory is seamless. In contrast,
Oracle integration is pain in the neck. Consequently, the user
administration is much easier in SQL Server, which might be relevant if you
let lot of people directly connect to the database.

- Oracle/Linux troubleshooting/performance tuning features are superior!
SQL Server is slowly catching up, but it's still way beyond Oracle.

- I discovered a couple of cases where SQL Server optimizer works better.
However, it's nothing that couldn't be achieved by rewriting the queries.

- SQL Server comes with BI components (Reporting & Analysis Server, SSIS).

I elaborated on many points above here:
https://nenadnoveljic.com/blog/category/comparison-oracle-sql-server/

Good luck!

Nenad

Twitter handle: @NenadNoveljic


-----Original Message-----
From: oracle-l-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx <oracle-l-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> On
Behalf Of Mladen Gogala
Sent: Donnerstag, 7. November 2019 21:43
To: oracle-l@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: oracle v SS

On 11/7/19 3:13 PM, Orlando L wrote:

Hi all

Trying to decide between oracle and sql server for a query/warehousing
type database. Can anyone share their input or point to a paper for
the current versions. Thanks

Orlando.

Hi Orlando!

SQL Server enterprise edition comes with what Oracle calls "In-Memory
option" and partitioning, no further licensing required. SQL Server doesn't
have multi-versioning  which makes things simpler for mostly query
database. On the flip side, readers block writers and vice versa, which
means that loading usually means downtime. SS has something called "always
on availability groups", which allows you to maintain shared nothing
"cluster" with several identical database copies, which can be queried in
parallel. SQL Server supports bitmap indexes and star
(snowflake) schema queries.  SQL Server EE is significantly cheaper than
Oracle. I would advise going with SQL Server.

Regards


--
Mladen Gogala
Database Consultant
Tel: (347) 321-1217

--
//www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l


____________________________________________________
Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
Bitte denken Sie an die Umwelt, bevor Sie dieses E-Mail drucken.

Important Notice

 This message is intended only for the individual named. It may contain
confidential or privileged information. If you are not the named addressee
you should in particular not disseminate, distribute, modify or copy this
e-mail. Please notify the sender immediately by e-mail, if you have
received this message by mistake and delete it from your system.
 Without prejudice to any contractual agreements between you and us which
shall prevail in any case, we take it as your authorization to correspond
with you by e-mail if you send us messages by e-mail. However, we reserve
the right not to execute orders and instructions transmitted by e-mail at
any time and without further explanation.
 E-mail transmission may not be secure or error-free as information could
be intercepted, corrupted, lost, destroyed, arrive late or incomplete. Also
processing of incoming e-mails cannot be guaranteed. All liability of
Vontobel Holding Ltd. and any of its affiliates (hereinafter collectively
referred to as "Vontobel Group") for any damages resulting from e-mail use
is excluded. You are advised that urgent and time sensitive messages should
not be sent by e-mail and if verification is required please request a
printed version.
 Please note that all e-mail communications to and from the Vontobel Group
are subject to electronic storage and review by Vontobel Group. Unless
stated to the contrary and without prejudice to any contractual agreements
between you and Vontobel Group which shall prevail in any case,
e-mail-communication is for informational purposes only and is not intended
as an offer or solicitation for the purchase or sale of any financial
instrument or as an official confirmation of any transaction.
 The legal basis for the processing of your personal data is the
legitimate interest to develop a commercial relationship with you, as well
as your consent to forward you commercial communications. You can exercise,
at any time and under the terms established under current regulation, your
rights. If you prefer not to receive any further communications, please
contact your client relationship manager if you are a client of Vontobel
Group or notify the sender.
 Please note for an exact reference to the affected group entity the
corporate e-mail signature.
 For further information about data privacy at Vontobel Group please
consult www.vontobel.com.


Other related posts: