Re: Reducing screen time

  • From: Jack Applewhite <jack.applewhite@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "mwf@xxxxxxxx" <mwf@xxxxxxxx>, "jkstill@xxxxxxxxx" <jkstill@xxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2020 22:02:24 +0000

Wish you all had something like my "office". It's on the 2nd floor of our home 
with a view out on our front yard, trees, and the street, so I can look away 
from my monitors at the squirrels, people, etc. playing and going by. Looking 
at distant objects DOES work, 'cause I don't suffer, at 69.

Our District, to save money, has had all us Techies work from home for the last 
3 years - a Huge benefit that's, sadly, not available to everyone. They gave me 
a brand new MacBook Pro recently and it's my workstation, though I don't really 
work on it or I'd be blind by now - teeny little fonts. It's just a platform to 
remote desktop to two VMs hosted by AISD - one is Win10 and one is Ubuntu.

I splurged and, at my expense (I'm worth it), got two 32" Samsung curved 
monitors at Sam's Club a few months ago and those are my work focal points. You 
just must have something bigger than a little ol' laptop screen. The size 
allows me to adjust resolution so my old eyes can easily read w/o glasses.

DON'T just SIT! I work at a standing "desk", which is a 2'x4' piece of 3/8" 
plywood on top of a couple of cheap 12" shelf units - all from Homeless Depot - 
on top of my regular 28" high desk. Got a stool long ago so my working "desk" 
can stay put, and I'm either sitting on the stool or standing. SO much better 
than just sitting, or moving one of those annoying Varidesks up and down. With 
one artificial knee and the other with O.A., I need to keep moving to keep 
loose.

Think Sustainable. If it's uncomfortable for a short time, it'll be damaging in 
the long run. Treat yourself to whatever you need. Also, do walk away from time 
to time to just think about your challenges, instead of banging away on trials.
--
Jack C. Applewhite - Database Administrator
Austin I.S.D. - MIS Department
512.414.9250 (wk)

I cannot help but notice that there is no problem between us that cannot be 
solved by your departure.  -- Mark Twain
________________________________
From: oracle-l-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx <oracle-l-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> on behalf 
of Jared Still <jkstill@xxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Monday, June 22, 2020 09:06
To: mwf@xxxxxxxx <mwf@xxxxxxxx>
Cc: oracle@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx <oracle@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>; oracle-l@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
<oracle-l@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Reducing screen time

That is what I do.

Just had to get in the habit of remembering to swap glasses when I walk out of 
the office.

On Thu, Jun 18, 2020 at 06:53 Mark W. Farnham 
<mwf@xxxxxxxx<mailto:mwf@xxxxxxxx>> wrote:
Band-aid, not cure: A good eye doctor will know there are mid range 
prescriptions in addition to near sighted correction and long range focus.

For day long keyboard use get yourself some mid range prescriptions (with 
bifocal "flat top" if you also need reading glasses). That is maximum size of 
the upper mid range.

Even if you don't need glasses for reading or long focus, if your eyes differ 
by just a little bit and are nearly co-dominant, your eye muscles constantly 
flex just a bit to bring them into exact match when you are staring at a fixed 
focal plane.

If you're under 35 or so, this little tug may be insignificant. As you age your 
lens stiffens. When I got to about 50, having never previously needed glasses 
at all, my eyes started getting "fuzzy" after about four continuous hours. Then 
I was toast for about two hours, not just for the screen, but for any reading 
or anything requiring clear focus.

(Taking a break helps, as previously mentioned in the thread.)

A classic case is one eye slightly near sighted and one eye slightly far 
sighted which tends to mean you don't get glasses (or need them) until you are 
old...

Good luck. If your eye doctor is NOT familiar with mid range focus plane 
glasses, get someone new.

-----Original Message-----
From: oracle-l-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:oracle-l-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:oracle-l-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:oracle-l-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>] On 
Behalf Of Norman Dunbar
Sent: Thursday, June 18, 2020 3:38 AM
To: oracle-l@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:oracle-l@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Reducing screen time

Good Morning Kunwar,

In the UK we have this set of rules: 
https://www.hse.gov.uk/msd/dse/<https://linkprotect.cudasvc.com/url?a=https%3a%2f%2fwww.hse.gov.uk%2fmsd%2fdse%2f&c=E,1,3k5l_tmghxcHRCkK3DnY0JEmbJfWvtjVF3RbSQOeGqADvfFQ_a9RRErklCc3YBPnaPsEVLLQM9q4v0VmYZTRNd785aqG7GArGye1FNBmZHo3O5i3RiQqXg,,&typo=1>.

Also, I was educated into taking an eye break every 15-20 minutes, where you 
look out the window or across the office etc, something to change where your 
eyes are focussing.

Get up an walk around every hour or so - go to the loo, make a coffee etc. Good 
for the eyes as well!

The crud we hear about "blue light" being *harmful* is "woo". It isn't a big 
enough problem to make any difference to your eyes. It *might* have an effect 
on your sleeping habits though - not that I have found it makes any difference. 
One link is 
https://www.hse.gov.uk/msd/dse/<https://linkprotect.cudasvc.com/url?a=https%3a%2f%2fwww.hse.gov.uk%2fmsd%2fdse%2f&c=E,1,fptGjcoGdjy40_Vh6GeHjJpvN3XVYJAtdrlRZEgJucObknB71qzgTVWt9gpVpKp9NXhR08i9e2whJipiY9PLrT-tC0mkkTRbOK3BPj97&typo=1>
 which
states:

White LEDs may actually emit more blue light than traditional light sources, 
even though the blue light might not be perceived by the user.
This blue light is unlikely to pose a physical hazard to the retina. But it may 
stimulate the circadian clock (your internal biological clock) more than 
traditional light sources, keeping you awake, disrupting sleep, or having other 
effects on your circadian rhythm.


HTH

Cheers,
Norm.

--
Norman Dunbar
Dunbar IT Consultants Ltd

Registered address:
27a Lidget Hill
Pudsey
West Yorkshire
United Kingdom
LS28 7LG

Company Number: 05132767
--
//www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l<https://linkprotect.cudasvc.com/url?a=http%3a%2f%2fwww.freelists.org%2fwebpage%2foracle-l&c=E,1,eodUoEUtGBGeKact2i5uPcO6lv9EA0g8UAZh6XhSDbc8yJO78PYbg7OrzseKz0Omt5HzlKLm3gANxkrHzuRtUDhibUeWFQEDvHDdvLNFfYOl-Lb19ilnWM_MRmk,&typo=1>




--
//www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l<https://linkprotect.cudasvc.com/url?a=http%3a%2f%2fwww.freelists.org%2fwebpage%2foracle-l&c=E,1,OZAsTaEr9FRLpzZyyPcPBXER_pzbgi9AiXqc4rODWmbNOiHdMvQjgKkGUTKM14JQBYwQTRWlRHRI5yvmIo2l5Pjah-Jnr-QiAwODNhWwsOtoyg,,&typo=1>


--
Jared Still
Certifiable Oracle DBA and Part Time Perl Evangelist
Principal Consultant at Pythian
Oracle ACE Alumni
Pythian Blog 
http://www.pythian.com/blog/author/still/<https://linkprotect.cudasvc.com/url?a=http%3a%2f%2fwww.pythian.com%2fblog%2fauthor%2fstill%2f&c=E,1,lgqJTYVz-gw34ocIhFKuDC5DxzpADjEW3yLjE6hsbSJoUPQHnIW9l5Fk5g1C2wJWWvOEAAinouWHxG1_Rvo6ZYfIUp6phRRe1k3g5PB-OWvdN1caR0pc4dtdEm1T&typo=1>
Github: https://github.com/jkstill


Confidentiality Notice: This email message, including all attachments, is for 
the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential student 
and/or employee information. Unauthorized use of disclosure is prohibited under 
the federal Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act (20 U.S.C. ?1232g, 34 CFR 
Part 99, 19 TAC 247.2, Gov't Code 552.023, Educ. Code 21.355, 29 CFR 
1630.14(b)(c)). If you are not the intended recipient, you may not use, 
disclose, copy or disseminate this information. Please call the sender 
immediately or reply by email and destroy all copies of the original message, 
including attachments.

Other related posts: