RE: Meltdown and spectre

  • From: "Reen, Elizabeth " <dmarc-noreply@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> (Redacted sender "elizabeth.reen" for DMARC)
  • To: "'fuzzy.graybeard@xxxxxxxxx'" <fuzzy.graybeard@xxxxxxxxx>, "oracle-l@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <oracle-l@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2018 16:32:54 +0000

True.  I had just read the news accounts so I was wondering why O/S 
manufacturers were making the patches. Neither side is clean here, but it was 
not really a problem if you had control of the whole server.  It’s only really 
become worth exploiting in the cloud.

Liz

Elizabeth Reen
CPB Database Group Manager
718.248.9930  (Office)
Service Now Group: CPB-ORACLE-DB-SUPPORT


From: oracle-l-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:oracle-l-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On ;
Behalf Of Hans Forbrich
Sent: Friday, January 05, 2018 6:51 PM
To: oracle-l@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: Meltdown and spectre

On 2018-01-05 2:33 PM, Reen, Elizabeth (Redacted sender elizabeth.reen for 
DMARC) wrote:
I have a background in system engineering.  I don’t get how a chip can be 
exploited.  What code can be hacked there?

For speculative execution, a command is executed that MIGHT be required.  That 
command might ask to move stuff into some portion of memory, or need a specific 
page moved in.  If that command is then rolled back, what happens to the memory 
that it just filled?  (Hint: it's still filled in, perhaps with a password.)  
Back in the day (early 90s) when this stuff was dreamt up, the idea of flushing 
that memory on command rollback would not have been a concern - hacking was for 
fun, not profit, in those days.  It's not actually the code being hacked, as 
much as a side effect that is not properly handled.

It wasn't just the hardware guys, either.  We s/w devs were pretty sloppy about 
things like end-of-arrays and random pointers in our code, and few people 
worried about (or even understood) what happened at the chip level.  (Remember 
why Java came into being?)

/Hans

Other related posts: