RE: Learn Cloud or Do Oracle OCM ..confused

  • From: "Clay Jackson (cjackson)" <Clay.Jackson@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: kunwar singh <krishsingh.111@xxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2019 19:46:19 +0000

A few thoughts –

As I think you can see from the other responses, the consensus is that 
certifications, in and of themselves, are not as valuable as the vendors of 
said certifications would like us to believe.    IMHO, Mladen hit all of the 
salient points dead on.

That said – Performance is critically important, and becoming more so every 
day.   However, the complexity “under the covers” is ALSO increasing.  I 
haven’t counted lately how many init parameters there are in Oracle; but, at 
least (from Oracle 6) through 12, the number (if one includes the “hidden” 
parameters) was on a non-linear increasing curve.  Also, while you may not 
aspire to Project or Team management today, at some point in your career 
someone is going to ask you to “take the lead”, and a “Gee, I’d rather not” 
response, or failure for lack of skills could be,  as is said,  “career 
limiting”.

Also, consider that 30 years ago (about when I started this nonsense),  
programming in C  was a “new” skillset and all the rage (and COBOL was “dead”). 
  Now, Oracle is threatening the ubiquity of Java by charging for the runtime, 
and there are MANY more choices, including object-oriented variants of C, COBOL 
and others, as well as Python, Ruby, ad infinitum.

A wise professor, when I took my Masters in Software Engineering, observed that 
“The gaps between ‘so-called journeymen’ in software is wider than in almost 
any other profession – where else would you find ‘experienced professionals’ 
with  gaps (he was talking about ‘lines of code that passed tests/per day’) as 
wide as 5 or 10 times.

When I was hiring (DBAS and coders, in previous lives, now all I do is talk to 
people and sell stuff 😊); I took an approach quite similar to what I expect 
Mladen was implying – I looked for people with specific skillsets, of course; 
but ALSO for people who:

  1.   Knew what they didn’t know (and admitted it)
  2.  When faced with an unknown, responded along the line,  “I don’t know; 
but, here’s how I would approach learning about and solving the problem”
  3.  Showed the ability to work on teams, either as a  subordinate or a leader
  4.  Showed the ability to learn new things
  5.  Showed an interest in our business
  6.  Were open to change (which, after all, is the only “constant”


Clay Jackson
Database Solutions Sales Engineer
clay.jackson@xxxxxxxxx<mailto:clay.jackson@xxxxxxxxx>
office  949-754-1203  mobile 425-802-9603
[cid:image002.png@01D58D8D.B168ACB0]

From: kunwar singh <krishsingh.111@xxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Saturday, October 26, 2019 1:59 PM
To: Clay Jackson (cjackson) <Clay.Jackson@xxxxxxxxx>
Cc: ORACLE-L <oracle-l@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Learn Cloud or Do Oracle OCM ..confused

CAUTION: This email originated from outside of the organization. Do not follow 
guidance, click links, or open attachments unless you recognize the sender and 
know the content is safe.

Hi Clay,
Thanks for your email . Very helpful insights . Your reply has been very 
helpful . At the same time it is making me wonder if your reply would be more 
relevant to me if were a project manager leading a group . But i am an 
individual contributor ( not leading people  ) and would like to remain one and 
usually individual contributors are hired based on a skill set and I am seeking 
to develop those skills . And that is where my question came from . Please 
correct me if you think I am wrong .

On Sat, Oct 26, 2019 at 1:41 PM Clay Jackson (cjackson) 
<Clay.Jackson@xxxxxxxxx<mailto:Clay.Jackson@xxxxxxxxx>> wrote:
To be brutally honest  - Certifications in general are a good indicator of 
someone’s ability to memorize answers and “parrot” responses.  While I’ve found 
Oracle Certifications “better than most” as far as “suitability for employment 
in a specific organization” indicators; they are still just ONE factor in a 
complex human interaction.

So, this “Grumpy Old Guy’s” recommendation would be to concentrate on the 
“human factors”, learning about why IT is important to business, how to 
interact with people on project teams,  how to adapt to change, and being a 
good “generalist”  as opposed to some specific technology which will be out of 
date by the time you get your certification.

Clay Jackson


From: oracle-l-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:oracle-l-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
<oracle-l-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:oracle-l-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>> On Behalf 
Of kunwar singh
Sent: Saturday, October 26, 2019 6:52 AM
To: ORACLE-L <oracle-l@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:oracle-l@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>>
Subject: Learn Cloud or Do Oracle OCM ..confused

CAUTION: This email originated from outside of the organization. Do not follow 
guidance, click links, or open attachments unless you recognize the sender and 
know the content is safe.


Hi all,

What would be more beneficial in the long term in your opinion?



Oracle OCM certification (and things learned during its time preparation ) or 
learning cloud .

I don’t want to do both as don’t get much free time and want to gain expert 
level knowledge so that I am gainfully employed for next 5 years or so .

I am oracle performance dba in my current role .

So looking for insights on what community members here think .



I am interested in both , but thinking what value OCM will hold with all the 
cloud focus these days . In my job I am getting chance to play with python , so 
atleast I am learning a new skill currently too.



Rgds,
Kunwar

--
Cheers,
Kunwar
--
Cheers,
Kunwar

PNG image

Other related posts: