[opendtv] Re: Why Apple doesn't sell televisions

  • From: Craig Birkmaier <brewmastercraig@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 21:29:17 -0500

On Feb 12, 2016, at 7:32 PM, Manfredi, Albert E 
<albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Very recently, I made the point that I would wait for 4K TV until certain 
standards and interfaces had been worked out. Among these was the dynamic 
range (contrast) enhancement algorithm (HDR). And your reply then was, just 
another excuse for people to demand royalty payments, or words to that effect.

Really?

I think you have it backwards. Please go back and find that post.

I just looked back through several months of posts and could not find it. But I 
did find this:

On 1/28 you wrote:

On the 4K issue, Craig, you seem to be doing one of your habitual about 
faces. Used to be that HDTVs were only good because they could oversample DVD 
content, remember? Transmitting in HD was supposed to be a waste, you 
insisted. Oversampling was supposedly all the rage.

By extension, you should think that 4K TVs are already useful, because they 
allow oversampling of HD content. With screens getting up into the 60"-80"+ 
range, this may not be so useless.

On 1/29 I responded:

And it still is important. It allows the shaped transitions required for 
Nyquist video filtering to add detail. But there are still IP battles to set 
the standards for the most important advancements surrounding 4K - extended 
dynamic range and improved color gamut. As many articles are saying, it is 
premature to buy a 4K display until these standards are set, and implemented.

And I have repeatedly said that the most important driver of 4K will be 
content that is NOT Nyquist filtered - the Lingua Franca of the web and 
computer displays. It should be obvious that more samples helps to reduce 
aliasing in unfiltered graphics and text. It's the difference between a 72 
dpi dot matrix printer and a 300 dpi laser printer.

That is why our smart phones and tablets have increased display resolution - 
not to support HD on a five inch screen. The same will be true for large 4K 
displays that are increasingly being used to deliver unfiltered content. But 
here too, the extended dynamic range and color gamut will be a major step 
forward, especially as it relates to the faithful reproduction of still 
images and graphics used to support e-commerce.

So please show us the posts where you said what you claim above, and I said it 
was an excuse for royalty payments...

I may well have said at some point that there are multiple proposals for the 
HDR standard. I might even have said that the winner is looking to cash in on 
the royalties.. But I did not fabricate any of the posts above...

Waiting for your apology...

Now that someone suggested perhaps Apple could play in this role, and btw why 
not Philips and all the rest, suddenly this becomes "interesting."

The article was interesting Bert; especially the implications when compared to 
the color TV standard.  I started out by asking everyone to ignore the Apple 
Fan Boys component of the article. Obviously there are several companies who 
would like their IP to be part of the standard.

Exactly. That's what Dolby does Bert. They invent critical
technologies then license them.

I know perfectly well how intellectual property works, Craig, and I have 
never had anything negative to say about it. But you have had, on multiple 
occasions, including on this very topic of HDR. My question is how come 
suddenly this has become "interesting."

Please  provide us with my comments as you claim.

That being said, I have frequently posted negative comments about standards 
that have been corrupted - like the ATSC standard. 

Far more interesting - without the FCC mandate on ATSC tuners, the
VSB patents would have been of little value.

Perhaps, because other techniques such as COFDM became available after 8-VSB.

Nope. COFDM  was created in the same time frame. The Grand Alliance companies 
claimed that they tested it and that it was not a viable alternative to 8-VSB. 

The DVB standard was published about 1-2 years after the ATSC standard and was 
in commercial use in the same time frame as the ATSC standard.

I distinctly remember the way in which CODFM was trashed by the ATSC; this was 
yet another trans-Atlantic standards/IP battle, not unlike NTSC versus PAL. In 
both cases the U.S. wound up with the inferior TV standard. The ATSC and DVB 
knew they could control their home turf - selling their technology to the rest 
of the world was the pot of gold at the end of the IP rainbow.

Unfortunately, this was the way the game was played in the last century. The 
globalization of technology, including the Internet and the LTE telco standard 
are finally moving us past this kind of regional protectionism.

But the same can be said in this example. Several organizations are working 
in this contrast enhancement field, and the patents of the losers will also 
not be worth much. The winner(s) will be the only ones to benefit. Nothing 
new, Craig. Just because the author likes Apple does not make this potential 
role any more interesting .

Or any less interesting. Cringely provided a very interesting perspective about 
a technology that will have a much more significant impact than HDTV.

Regards
Craig

Bert




----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: