[opendtv] Re: TV Technology: Hey FCC: #theboxainttheproblem

  • From: "Manfredi, Albert E" <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Thu, 25 Feb 2016 01:41:56 +0000

Craig Birkmaier wrote:

Unfortunately, this has little if anything to do with the
mandates that Congress placed upon the FCC to open up the
market for MVPD STBs,

Has everything to do with it, when you see that Charter Communications has 
already sidestepped the whole problem. It's all about meeting the goal, without 
following the legacy thinking of the FCC.

Opening up a MVPDs broadband pipes to other ISPs is meaningless,

That's a side discussion, pertaining to the TV Technology article. Not 
meaningless, but not applicable to this FCC box program. If the broadband pipe 
were available to multiple ISPs, the need for mandating ISP neutrality would be 
greatly reduced, or eliminated. And you would also expect more competitive 
pricing. But it's irrelevant to the topic at hand.

Yesterday I posted this:

http://www.multichannel.com/news/video/charter-lineup-joins-roku/394487

As you can see, Charter is making its signal compatible with several media 
players, as well as its own rented STB, by adding a downloadable security app 
to IP streaming. So Charter doesn't have to wait for any FCC legacy-conceived 
box.

Quoting from the Multichannel article:

"Charter President Tom Rutledge said Monday (Oct. 12) that its customers would 
be able to use Roku devices to access TV content on any Roku-connected screen 
in the house using the Spectrum TV app, which means the device will offer cable 
channels alongside streamed over-the-top (OTT) content on those sets. ... 'We 
will continue to add greater functionality to the channel on Roku devices, 
including On Demand, and plan to make Spectrum TV available on additional 
consumer electronic set-top boxes and screens,' said Rutledge in a statement."

It's another example of something that *is* happening a whole lot faster than 
what some people, including the FCC, might think. Mention something one day, 
and not many days later it has happened. This won't take any 20 years, nor will 
it take any new standards or ponderous agreements. Certainly not for Charter, 
anyway.

1. The App and Roku box can only be used when connected to the
MVPD umbilical cord of a user that subscribes to both the TV
service and broadband. The App does not work via Internet
connections outside the point of service due to geographic
contract limitations and FCC rules.

This does not matter, Craig. First, it's a purely artificial limitation, same 
as limitations TVE imposes artificially. Most importantly, it's *not* an issue 
for this FCC NPRM. The FCC-conceived box too is only intended to be used within 
the confines of walled gardens. Charter is getting in bed with the makers of 
different streaming boxes, but they are not requiring any redesign of existing 
boxes. Just use of a downloadable Spectrum TV security app. Those Roku boxes 
aren't using any n-QAM broadcast streams.

2. Both Charter and TWC note that some channels are not available via
the Roku Apps due to contractual limitations (both specifically talk
about problems with rights for "local" channels).

Nothing technical there either. Agreements are easily rewritten, when the 
owners of content see the advantage to themselves. Which, evidently, is the 
case at Charter.

So, Charter has already taken care of meeting this NPRM. "FCC, our standards 
are those used by Roku and other streaming boxes, so we already comply." And 
presumably the content owners are satisfied. Now the question becomes, why 
would Charter remain so polite as to not offer its walled-up content to the 
whole country? That's the inevitable next step. So, as this next step unfolds, 
the foot-dragging MVPDs might just have to compete, by doing much the same 
thing. But again, this has nothing to do with the NPRM.

DBS companies are reinventing themselves as Internet companies already, Craig, 
and they seem to be doing so a lot faster than it would take to go through the 
FCC-imagined plan for this STB. There will be some households out in the 
boonies that have no access to broadband, but my bet is that satellite or other 
wireless broadband options can be provided to them a lot faster than this FCC 
standard box. Besides, there are only two DBS companies, so it's hardly 
difficult for a box maker to create a DBS-compatible box.

Bert


 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: