[opendtv] Re: Sparkle

  • From: "Manfredi, Albert E" <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2016 21:10:36 +0000

Craig Birkmaier wrote:

Simply stated, there is a good reason you can enjoy HDR on an OLED
display with only 500 nits of brightness, while it takes more than
1000 nits to do the same with LCD.

I continue to think that the problem here is Craig has not yet grasped the 
concept of "dynamic range." Same problem he had with "HDR mode" in smartphones. 
I already explained why 500 nits MAY, depending on the viewing venue, replace 
just brightness alone, Craig. And why it may NOT. Were my numbers not clear?

The reason is dynamic range. For HDR, you need at least that 5 orders of 
magnitude. If OLED can support 5 orders of magnitude of range, it is thanks to 
its blacker blacks. But here's the catch, Craig. The blacker blacks have to be 
*usable*. Otherwise, the point is moot.

If a panel can support 0.005 to 500 nits, *and* it is viewed in a room with 
very subdued ambient light, so that 0.005 nits are not totally lost, then you 
have a chance. If not, you don't have a chance. That's why, for real world home 
environments, LCDs, with their brighter brights, may be a better choice. (And 
they are also cheaper, which is a bonus.)

It might help Craig to put this in the broader perspective. In audio, dynamic 
range is well understood. In audio, your softest sounds have to be above the 
noise floor of the equipment and of the room you are listening in, or they are 
lost. If you raise the softest sounds, to get them above the noise floor, and 
keep dynamic range constant, the loudest sounds become louder. Too often, the 
loudest sounds would become too loud.

The same applies to video. If the room cannot make use of 0.005 nits, because 
ambient light is too high, you have to increase those darks. But now oops, you 
have to simultaneously increase the brightness of the brightest images, in 
order to present the desired amount of dynamic range. And too often, **OLEDs 
won't support those required brighter brights**. Get this, Craig? That's why 
your repetition of 500 nits for HDR is pointless. 500 nits may simply be 
inadequate. 

And bit depth impacts both luminance and color depth.

Another tangential point that was never in debate. Everyone knows that 
brightness in RGB is created by a combination of the three colors. Why add 
those words, when that's common knowledge?

Meanwhile, SHOW ME where the "10," in the HDR 10 moniker, refers to "bits of 
luminance." That was the point you made. And in addition, show me where Dolby 
uses 10 bits for luminance. Surely, if that is fact, you should be able to 
prove it. I haven't found that "fact." But one never knows. 

The real problem here is that "SDR" has been mismanaged for decades.

That is most likely another tangential point, mostly irrelevant to this HDR 
discussion. I've never seen SDR give the dazzle that HDR can provide. You claim 
some vague idea about "mismanaged," but I find that non-credible. As always, 
because you don't support this comment. If you are right, that SDR can provide 
the sparkling highlights, then prove it.

Besides which, the wider color gamut is an orthogonal argument. In principle, 
and this is especially easy to demo if you use Y Cb Cr, you should be able to 
show that HDR and WCG gamut are two different things. If you use RGB, you can 
also demonstrate that, but it's more difficult to show in a way that's obvious 
to the clueless. With Y Cb Cr, in principle, you can demo a black and white 
image in HDR, and you can easily demonstrate the bits of luminance required for 
this.

And there's another aspect. Aside from encoding bits, the panel has to be able 
to support the dynamic range in brightness levels. This is why, when you 
mentioned the encoding bits that iPhones could digest, you were unconvincing. 
You had not supported your claim that the panels were up to HDR, or for that 
matter, even SDR standards.

Bert


 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: