[opendtv] Re: Sparkle

  • From: "Manfredi, Albert E" <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Fri, 2 Dec 2016 03:43:37 +0000

Craig Birkmaier wrote:

I spent years working with display experts like Joe Kane and
others.

Good for you, Craig. But it proves nothing. I will explain below what it takes 
to claim you have an HDR display. You stated that smartphones and tablets are 
available with HDR displays. All you have to do is support your claim. Or just 
say ooops, my bad. Should be simple enough.

(Parenthetically, years ago now, a "master mechanic" tried to inform me that 
the "condenser," in a Kettering point ignition, was connected to the secondary 
windings of the coil. But that would make no sense. Real facts are verifiable, 
Craig. One doesn't need to take anyone's word for anything, unless what they 
say sounds credible and can be verified.)

What you are missing is that there is a continuum between
today's 8 bit luminance representations and the specifications
that Mark was citing for HDR.

Except that there are specific definitions at play now. This first, very recent 
article, only tells half the story, but it's a start:

http://www.digitaltrends.com/home-theater/hdr-for-tvs-explained/

It states that SDR displays, at their brightest, provide 300 to 500 nits. 
Compare that to the displays of smartphones and tablets, to see if they are 
meaningfully better. It also states:

"In April, the UHD Alliance - an inter-industry group made up of companies like 
Samsung, LG, Sony, Panasonic, Dolby, and many others - announced the Ultra HD 
Premium certification for UHD Blu-ray players. This benchmark sets some 
baseline goals for HDR, like the ability to display up to 1,000 nits of 
brightness and feature a minimum of 10-bit color depth. Both HDR10 and Dolby 
Vision meet the standards set by the certification, but how they go about it 
varies greatly between the two."

They should also have provided an idea of the dimmest possible content, but at 
least you have the 1000 nits parameter to work with. The wider color gamut 
might be associated, but you can have WCG without HDR, in principle. Getting 
the super bright output from your small hand held devices is a much harder nut 
to crack.

This article is better. It quantifies the range of brightness needed for HDR:

https://pro.sony.com/bbsccms/assets/files/cat/hdr/latest/MK20109V1_1_HDR.pdf

It says that SDR covers a range of nits of 3 orders of magnitude, whereas HDR 
provides 5 orders of magnitude. So, something like 0.3 to 300 nits is SDR. To 
qualify as HDR, you would need to be able to display a range 0.01 to 1000 nits, 
for example, or 0.005 to 500 nits. This is what I'm talking about. Now you have 
the information needed to prove whether smartphone and tablet displays can 
achieve this range, rather than just barely meet the same specs as SDR displays.

Before insisting on your fanciful ideas, verify your facts, Craig.

I would note that there is little difference between "real" HDR image
acquisition and the three exposure technique used in many smartphone
cameras - both acquire the HDR information.

This is what convinces me you have yet to understand what HDR display is. Funny 
thing is, I have never noticed any confusion on dynamic range when it comes to 
audio.

In principle, if you play the little game of taking three images on an SDR 
camera, IN PRINCIPLE (I repeat), you can process the images to send to HDR 
displays. But that is **not** what these hand held appliances are doing. The 
fact that you don't see the difference is truly weird, because the processing 
these devices *are doing* is exactly the opposite of what it takes to send 
images to HDR displays.

Let me repeat this: HDR mode in a smartphone camera is used to capture high 
dynamic range in a *scene*, and then compress that high dynamic range so it can 
better be displayed on an SDR display. The bright parts are dimmed, the dim 
parts are brightened. There is no way you can pretend this is HDR display.

Now, go ahead and quote something credible that says otherwise, Craig.

Bert


 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: