[opendtv] Re: Sparkle

  • From: Craig Birkmaier <brewmastercraig@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Thu, 01 Dec 2016 08:06:56 -0500

On Nov 30, 2016, at 10:17 PM, Manfredi, Albert E 
<albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Wow. Again Craig doesn't get it. Please take another look at Mark's video on 
HDR, Craig. Pay attention to what Mark says EVEN about darkened theaters.

Dear Bert

I spent years working with display experts like Joe Kane and others. Joe 
produced DVDs designed to optimize the performance of (primarily) projection 
systems for home theaters. Let's just say that most people do not adjust their 
TVs properly to deliver the optimal performance from the display; most push 
brightness to the limit, typically to overcome ambient lighting conditions. 

What you are missing is that there is a continuum between today's 8 bit 
luminance representations and the specifications that Mark was citing for HDR. 
As was the case with early home theater systems, followed by HD and now UHD, 
most systems will not provide the performance called for in the specifications, 
if for no other reason than the unwillingness of consumers to create ideal 
viewing environments. As Mark, and then you pointed out, even a theater may not 
deliver optimal viewing due to light reflected from the screen.

But this DOES NOT mean that we will not see improvements with HDR and WCG. It 
means we may not enjoy 100% of the experience. To be honest, this has been true 
since day one of TV, and will be true into perpetuity.

The improved viewing experience offered by OLED was CLEARLY OBVIOUS at Best Buy 
under far from ideal ambient lighting conditions. You don't need 1500 nits of 
brightness to enjoy most of the benefits of HDR. You do need controlled ambient 
lighting conditions. Can you achieve this with a mobile device?

The answer is yes. One popular feature/app for smart phones is to use the LED 
that provides illumination for "flash" photography as a "flashlight." Guess 
what the ambient lighting conditions are whey you need a flashlight? If there 
is a reason we won't appreciate HDR on smartphones it is:

The screen size is too small to see fine details that will be enabled by HDR.

I guarantee you that HDR and WCG will be features of future smart phones and 
tablets. This iPad Pro offers a major improvement over earlier LCD displays, 
but does not meet the technical specs for HDR.


But we can get close enough under controlled ambient light conditions.

Proclaims Craig, as if mobile devices have that luxury. Point to a credible 
source that explains how smartphones and tablets display HDR, and don't get 
confused with descriptions of dynamic range reduction (aka "HDR mode")!

Already provided that a week or two ago. LCD smartphones and tablets are 
getting close, OLED is already there in terms of the display, but these Android 
devices typically don't support 10 bit luminance.

Thanks for agreeing with my analysis. You don"t need 4K source to take
full advantage of 4K displays.

I must have missed where, in "your analysis," you indicated that all the 
arcane arguments are moot. You didn't seem to grasp that 4K's prices have 
dropped to where buying HD sets makes no sense, hence to where they will 
disappear from store shelves. And worse:

I even provided a mia culpa after looking at TVs at Best Buy Bert. You cannot 
even accept being right about something without arguing. THe correct response 
is:

Thank You.

But what I was talking about was not whether people will buy 4K displays, but 
whether most video, be it broadcast or streaming, will be delivered as 4k. You 
finally agreed that it may not be necessary, even an improvement in delivered 
quality, to deliver more than 1080P.

Although you go on at great lengths explaining why 4K is not a big 
improvement over HD, in home environments, you seem to miss completely that 
any potential for HDR would be just as wasted, in mobile appliances.

Because you are wrong. Mobile devices are used in all kinds of environments. 
Thereb may be less benefit on smartphones, due to both usage cases and screen 
size, but tablets are a much different story. Many people use tablets today for 
TV entertainment, in environments that are essentially the same as for a TV. 
HDR will not be wasted on these second screens. In fact, it may become widely 
available on these screens before big screen TVs. 

This is not conjecture; I'm writing this message on a tablet that already offer 
much of the benefit of HDR and support for the cinema P3 color gamut. Did I 
mention it is fairly dark in here? The Logitech illuminated keyboard is really 
handy!

Regards
Craig
 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: