[opendtv] Re: Google exec: TV's future looks bright--for 90 seconds

  • From: "John Willkie" <johnwillkie@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Thu, 8 Mar 2007 16:37:43 -0800

Shades of "Short Attention Span Theater."  This is a market that mobile
video could work in, and even 8-vsb is likely to support this in
mobile/portable applicatons, since it can provide good signal quality for 90
seconds here and there.

John Willkie

P.S.  I'd go on, but people likely to enjoy 90 second video clips have
already moved on.
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Manfredi, Albert E" <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx>
To: <opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Thursday, March 08, 2007 9:56 AM
Subject: [opendtv] Google exec: TV's future looks bright--for 90 seconds


> "In an experiment conducted jointly by Google and MTV and aimed at the
> coveted youth demographic, it was determined that the average viewer
> could tolerate a program only one minute and 30 seconds in length, after
> which boredom set in."
>
> I'd say, on an interative platform such as a PC, of course this is true.
> But there aren't too many DVDs that last only 90 seconds, and yet even
> kids seem to watch DVD movies.
>
> This is a case of "it's hard to hype up something that's been around for
> 50 years, and easy to hype up something unrelated, and pretend it's
> related, just because it's new."
>
> Bert
>
> ----------------------------------------------------
> Google exec: TV's future looks bright--for 90 seconds
>
> David Benjamin
> (03/07/2007 3:56 PM EST)
> URL: http://www.eetimes.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=197800929
>
> DUBLIN, Ireland - In an upbeat keynote presentation before the DVB World
> forum here Wednesday (March 7), Vincent Dureau, head of TV technology
> for Google, reassured his audience of television technologists that
> their medium remains "relevant"-even as it seems to face a mortal threat
> to its popularity and revenue from his medium, the Internet.
>
> "We don't believe the Internet is replacing television," he said. "The
> Web is actually complementary to television."
>
> But he added that in a "connected world," the Web is "the cloud" where
> people will eventually keep their content. "Don't trap your content on
> devices," said Dureau. "You're better off moving your content to the
> Web."
>
> Devices will persist, he said, as keys to content delivery, and
> television remains the overwhelmingly favorite device.
>
> Dureau cited a recent experiment in which CBS television provided
> samples of its newest broadcast content to the popular YouTube website.
> In YouTube's teen and post-teen demographic group, which is coveted by
> advertisers but reportedly indifferent to TV, three of the CBS programs
> were among YouTube's "Top 25" most-viewed. Dureau added to this good
> news the cheerful promise that more Americans will vote in this year's
> American Idol TV competition than will vote in next year's presidential
> election.
>
> In further support of TV's prevalence, Dureau noted that, despite
> advertisers' growing interest in the Web, television still reaches four
> times as large an audience as the Internet. He added that ad volume on
> the Internet is only one-fifth as large as TV ad volume.
>
> Dureau sketched a future in which video content produced by users for
> the Web will join with programs from traditional broadcasters to create
> richer, more-professional content on both media. He trumpeted the Web as
> a "video playground" for broadcasters, permitting them to experiment
> with formats and programs.
>
> By 2010, Duereau said, technology will exist for programmers and
> broadcast operators to offer users a library of all video content from
> all sources, including the Web, on TV. Advertisers will be "putting
> money on specialized content, provided by programmers and operators" but
> partly consisting of user-generated video.
>
> Dureau addressed one serious concern among both broadcasters and
> advertisers- that "ad zapping" by consumers with personal video
> recorders will make TV ads obsolete. To allay this fear, he cited
> Google's experience of using the Web's interactivity capabilities to
> identify users' interests, which Internet advertisers can then target.
> The same potential, he said, applies to TV advertising.
>
> "Advertisers will end up paying a premium for better and targeted
> advertising," said Dureau.
>
> Among his rosy predictions for the lucrative convergence of TV and
> Internet technologies, however, Dureau injected one troubling note: In
> the multimedia future, the audience will have a puppy's attention span.
> In an experiment conducted jointly by Google and MTV and aimed at the
> coveted youth demographic, it was determined that the average viewer
> could tolerate a program only one minute and 30 seconds in length, after
> which boredom set in. The same average viewer could watch only three
> such 90-second videos in a row-four and a half minutes-before losing
> interest.
>
> The ideal ad in this experiment had a duration of five seconds.
>
> All material on this site Copyright 2007 CMP Media LLC. All rights
> reserved.
>
>
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