[opendtv] Re: FCC TAKES STEPS TO ALLOW NEW LOW POWER DEVICES ON VACANT TV CHANNELS

  • From: "Dale Kelly" <dalekelly@xxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Tue, 24 Oct 2006 12:02:13 -0700

>>Tom wrote:
Is my new unlicensed wireless microphone allowed to interfere with your
old unlicensed wireless microphone?

Wireless microphones used by broadcasters in vacant TV channels, and
elsewhere, are authorized by the FCC. Since they are typically used for news
and sports production at many varied locations, licensing them to a specfic
frequency is not practicle. These devices are generally frequency agile and
frequency availability at specific locations is controlled by that areas
frequency coordintor, which is most often a funtion of the local SBE
(Society of Broadcast Engineers)chapter, as authorized by the FCC.
This local coordination encompasses all Broadcast Auxilliary service
frequency assignments, including microphones, ENG and fixed microwave and
two way radio. In the major TV/Radio markets this is a critical and very
intricate process; without it chaos rules.

Dale

-----Original Message-----
From: opendtv-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:opendtv-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx]On Behalf Of Tom Barry
Sent: Tuesday, October 24, 2006 9:47 AM
To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [opendtv] Re: FCC TAKES STEPS TO ALLOW NEW LOW POWER DEVICES ON
VACANT TV CHANNELS


Much of the question seems to be whether existing users of unlicensed
spectrum should have some sort of license or "squatters rights" to that
spectrum.

Is my new unlicensed wireless microphone allowed to interfere with your
old unlicensed wireless microphone?

- Tom


Hunold, Ken wrote:
> Craig,
>
> I'm not intimately involved in the process, but my understanding is that
> unallocated TV channels are used for broadcast applications, most often
> wireless microphones, for news and sports broadcasts (and in New York,
> Broadway theatre performances.)  As most of these channels aren't really
> vacant, these links are limited by interference.  It is not easy
> shoe-horning in all the people who want to use the system today, not
> counting any new users.  As far as I know, it has not been demonstrated
> how well the front ends of these new unlicensed devices would be at
> detecting whether there is already anyone operating on a channel that
> the unlicensed device wants to use.  My understanding is that these
> devices are designed to be inexpensive, so how much of the product cost
> will be devoted to determining when and where the device *cannot* work?
> All that has been stated so far is that these devices *could* check
> before they transmit.  This is not an "ethernet" environment where
> collisions are expected and most often dealt with by repeating the
> transmission before anyone knows that it didn't work the first time.
> That is not the strategy used by broadcast devices.
>
> Also, any additional interference could interrupt extant signals
> (wireless microphones in this example) while the new services are firing
> up and negotiating their own services.  How many times do you think
> producers will accept their programs being interrupted in this manner?
> I think the number would be less than one, if possible.  Nothing is
> worse than seeing lips move and not hearing anything, or hearing hash.
> I'm sure you've been there before.  As stated before, it would be
> extremely difficult to find the interference source after it occurs, and
> even if you did, the damage has been done.
>
> In most markets, there isn't any unused spectrum for these existing
> services to move to.  At the risk of sounding nimby-esque, why not let
> these new devices use some of the other "new" already
> shared-digital-usage spectrum?
>
> Ken Hunold
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: opendtv-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:opendtv-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
> On Behalf Of Craig Birkmaier
> Sent: Wednesday, October 18, 2006 11:12 AM
> To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: [opendtv] Re: FCC TAKES STEPS TO ALLOW NEW LOW POWER DEVICES ON
> VACANT TV CHANNELS
>
> At 9:18 AM -0400 10/17/06, Hunold, Ken wrote:
>
>>Perhaps I shouldn't be surprised, but my point has been missed (or
>>perhaps co-opted.)
>>
>>The type of interference I am referring to is not direct interference
>>to broadcast stations by unlicensed wireless devices.  This could be
>>the case at the edge of coverage for broadcast stations, but that is a
>>different debate.
>>
>>The sort of interference that I am talking about affects the TV
>>Production industry that feeds the broadcast, cable, and other
>>entertainment industries.  Unlicensed devices could affect every live
>>news and sports program origination, and it would be very difficult to
>>find the source of the problems that these devices would cause.
>
>
> Ken
>
> What frequency bands are used today for these broadcast applications?
>
> As I understand it, there is an expectation that any uses of these
> frequencies would be required to check for other users so as NOT to
> interfere. Also, I would assume that it would be possible for
> broadcasters to utilize ANY unused frequency for the kind of
> applications you have described, thus there might be a significant
> increase in the available frequencies for these applications.
>
> Regards
> Craig
>
>
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--
Tom Barry                       trbarry@xxxxxxxxxxx
Find my resume and video filters at www.trbarry.com


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