[opendtv] Re: FCC CHAIRMAN PROPOSAL TO UNLOCK THE SET-TOP BOX: CREATING CHOICE & INNOVATION

  • From: Craig Birkmaier <brewmastercraig@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sun, 21 Feb 2016 08:12:49 -0500

I said end of story, but one last time...
 

Fewer words, and more understanding of the subject matter, Craig. TCP is 
carrying the streaming packets, in most cases (UDP could be used too, but 
then it wouldn't be a stream from a web server, right Craig?), and TCP is a 
point to point, two-way protocol. Which means, the adjustment of the codec 
settings, to match your own link speed, and the controls like fast forward 
and reverse, are all part of that streaming protocol, which uses TCP. Even if 
UDP is used, it too would carry the streaming packets, and normally would 
also be unicast.

The one-way broadcast medium doesn't have, cannot have, any of those 
features. you cannot control the broadcast stream from your set, Craig. Even 
if it's digital broadcast. The best you can do is record it, and then control 
the recording in playback. Do I really have to explain this?

No Bert. You do not, because, as I keep pointing out, this is just irrelevant 
minutiae. The underlying transports (and standards stacks) are different.

As to what you call "actual data." The streaming protocol MAY use MPEG-2 TS 
for synchronization, although most do not, but do much the same thing in 
other ways. And the codecs MAY be identical, carrying the same MPEG packets. 
So that part has always been the same, or very similar. Always, Craig. I know 
you feel offended that the ATSC adopted a "Table 3," but honestly, when you 
are limited to a one-way broadcast medium, it's PERFECTLY acceptable to limit 
the choices.

Philosophy Bert.

The MPEG-2 standard DOES NOT contain the limitations of Table 3; it does not 
need to by design. 

The cable industry does not use Table 3; they use fully compliant MPEG-2 
decoders. And many systems now support h.264.

The FCC deleted Table 3 from the ATSC standard. 

It may have been necessary to limit the initial "applications layer" to MPEG-2, 
as did the cable industry and DBS systems - it was the best technology 
available at that time. 

It was NOT necessary for the ATSC to create a limited table of formats for TV 
receivers - that was a bastardized of the standard that was INTENTIONAL.

It favored the legacy interlaced SD and HD formats INTENTIONALLY; this created 
barriers to interoperability. 

It prohibited progressive scan EDTV formats fully supported by MPEG-2 that are 
widely used around the world, especially on the Internet. This too was 
INTENTIONAL, as the square pixel, wide screen 480P format was already in use 
and delivered most of the benefits of HDTV - another obvious competitive threat.

Bottom line, however, there is nothing stopping broadcasters
from continuously updating the application layer technologies
used to deliver TV content, exactly as has happened with the
Internet.

Nonsense.

Yes, you keep spouting nonsense.

There is NOTHING stopping broadcasters from continuously updating the 
applications layer technologies used to deliver TV content...

Except for he wrongheaded decision to lock everything down and mandate that it 
be built into every TV. This decision was also INTENTIONAL. Every other 
business that delivers TV entertainment has evolved with digital technology.

Your solution to this dilemma is to tell us that live TV is not necessary - 
just kill the industry that makes your wrongheaded arguments inconvenient. 

The biggest obstacle is that TV sets aren't upgradeable remotely.

Mine is. I get notices to upgrade frequently.

Sure, the broadcasters could hand out free HDMI sticks, and irritate people 
who just want to watch good old broadcast TV.

No need. They could do as all of their competitors do, and offer attractive 
options that the public would pay for. They could work (collude?) with Google 
and Apple and Amazon to add the necessary functionality to the devices they 
design to enhance the TV experience.

Instead, they refuse to make their content available on a competitive basis and 
let their OTA standard slip into irrelevance.

Another obstacle is that this is a one-way broadcast medium. A lot of updates 
to streaming protocols have to do with the controls, e.g. in making 
interactive ads. Doesn't work with one-way broadcast. Another obstacle is 
that no one cares. TV is a mature medium.

No need. My TV can get software updates because it is connected to the 
Internet, as are ALL of the little boxes you despise. And the ATSC is currently 
working on digital broadcast standards that leverage the Internet to create new 
services - you are stuck in a legacy box.

Instead of me trying to guess what your misunderstandings are give us some 
examples of whiz bang new features you'd want from a one-way broadcast 
medium. Then I'll pick them apart.

We've been doing that for years Bert. When we do this you get hopelessly lost 
in irrelevant technical arguments. We need look no further back that our 
discussions about ATSC 3.0. 

If you have more flexibility of choice over the Internet, that's
because it ain't broadcast.

Pure crapola Bert. There is NOTHING different at the application
level.

The hell it isn't. Once again, rather than me trying to figure out the gaps 
in your understanding, give me examples of what you would want from 
broadcasters.

A modern digital broadcast system that works reliably with simple antennas, 
both indoors and out. 

A system that can use new standards as they become practical, just as we see 
with the Internet.

A system that takes advantage of the Internet as a back channel to support 
advanced services.

I could go on, but you should just look up the documents we have already 
discussed that list the objectives of the ATSC 3.0 standards work.

This is not to say that ATSC 3.0 is necessary. Most of these capabilities - 
other than the deficiencies of the modulation system - can be implemented using 
ATSC 1.0.

Garbage response. DTV is just another data pipe.

Just the kind of vague nonsense we've come to expect, Craig. A one way pipe 
cannot support the same "apps" as two-way pipes. It's that simple. And the 
small aspects that can be the same, or very similar, i.e. the stream of MPEG 
packets, ALREADY ARE. And have been, from day 1.

Give it up Bert. Nobody expects a one way broadcast pipe to deliver the same 
capabilities as a two-way pipe. But we do expect broadcasters to offer the best 
technologies and capabilities available, and to innovate.

 If we are going to continue to allow them to have virtually free use of a 
valuable spectrum resource, THEY need to fully exploit that resource. Instead 
they choose to exploit a Congressional giveaway, designed to generate a second 
revenue stream using competitors to deliver their programming. 

The main reason that broadcasters do not innovate is the ATSC standard is an 
irrelevant placeholder. It enables retrans consent and provides a lucrative 
revenue stream for the members of the ATSC club.

End of story.

Regards
Craig
 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: