[opendtv] Re: FCC CHAIRMAN PROPOSAL TO UNLOCK THE SET-TOP BOX: CREATING CHOICE & INNOVATION

  • From: Craig Birkmaier <brewmastercraig@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sat, 20 Feb 2016 09:47:29 -0500

On Feb 20, 2016, at 12:04 AM, Manfredi, Albert E 
<albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Craig Birkmaier wrote:

If apps that lie at the top layer of the IP stack (or simply ride
atop the stack) are responsible for the wonders of streaming video,
the same apps can be used to enable video streams delivered by the
"broadcast stack."

No. Not usually. Web browsers use TCP/IP. They operate on a client server 
model, unicast comms.

WOW!!!!  I did not expect Bert to walk into this trap. But we have come to 
expect this kind of "ready, fire, aim" response from Bert.

TCP/IP is part of the Internet stack used to support applications. The 
application we are discussing here is streaming a TV program. The ACTUAL data 
that makes up that program is compressed audio, compressed video, and perhaps 
some metadata. How the packets that deliver that data are delivered is handled 
by lower layers of the stack. For OTT services that use the Internet, TCP/IP is 
used to link the server and device, and regulate the flow of packets. For OTA 
broadcasting, MPEG-2 transport handles the packet data. 

In BOTH cases the program content "can" be identical. But it can also be 
different. 

With the broadcast stack you get one choice - whatever Table 3 MPEG-2 format 
used to encode the program. 

With TCP/IP you may get multiple choices based on negotiations between the 
requesting device and the server delivering the streams. Thus you can choose a 
"format" that is appropriate for the bandwidth available to the device and the 
resources the device supports (FLASH, h.264, etc.).

Clearly the Internet offers more flexibility and capability. A broadcaster 
could offer multiple options as well - they ARE running a multiplex that can, 
and typically does, offer multiple streams. But Bert correctly asserts that 
this is inefficient use of the bandwidth available to the station.

Bottom line, however, there is nothing stopping broadcasters from continuously 
updating the application layer technologies used to deliver TV content, exactly 
as has happened with the Internet.

It's just the philosophy behind a business model - a model that does not care 
whether anyone is actually using the antenna service that allow the station to 
generate a second revenue stream from the MVPD services that most viewers are 
actually watching.

But this has nothing to do with the main point, which is that you need that 
application. The ATSC had to define the whole end to end process, every bit 
as much as you need a browser often with plug-ins, or a media player, to 
decode video from the Internet. To make it work, you need an end to end 
solution, Craig. If you have more flexibility of choice over the Internet, 
that's because it ain't broadcast.

Pure crapola Bert. There is NOTHING different at the application level.

One service chose a business model based on an open, interoperable and 
extensible philosophy.

The other chose a closed end-to-end business model.

Absurd. Like most conspiracy theories, they don't make any sense, in the end. 
They had to pick everything, because OTA TV is broadcast and not unicast.

Garbage response. DTV is just another data pipe.

All data pipes rely on applications that ride atop the stack used to deliver 
the bits.

End of story.

Regards
Craig 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: