[opendtv] Re: FCC CHAIRMAN PROPOSAL TO UNLOCK THE SET-TOP BOX: CREATING CHOICE & INNOVATION

  • From: "Manfredi, Albert E" <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sat, 20 Feb 2016 05:04:07 +0000

Craig Birkmaier wrote:

If apps that lie at the top layer of the IP stack (or simply ride
atop the stack) are responsible for the wonders of streaming video,
the same apps can be used to enable video streams delivered by the
"broadcast stack."

No. Not usually. Web browsers use TCP/IP. They operate on a client server 
model, unicast comms. For example, the typical TV stream over the Internet 
adjusts dynamically to the type of device you are using, and the link speed, 
between the server and *your* client computer. It requires a two-way process. 
But this has nothing to do with the main point, which is that you need that 
application. The ATSC had to define the whole end to end process, every bit as 
much as you need a browser often with plug-ins, or a media player, to decode 
video from the Internet. To make it work, you need an end to end solution, 
Craig. If you have more flexibility of choice over the Internet, that's because 
it ain't broadcast.

That is what they CHOSE to do. They did this to control the
standards,

Absurd. Like most conspiracy theories, they don't make any sense, in the end. 
They had to pick everything, because OTA TV is broadcast and not unicast. You 
turn on your set, you are expected to ingest exactly the same stream as 
everyone else. UNLIKE what you might do with your Internet sessions with a 
server, where that server can identify your particular box, your particular 
link speed, and decide what's best for you. That won't work with one-way 
broadcast, Craig! It's way too wasteful of spectrum to simulcast dozens of 
streams. That only makes sense in unicast, where the servers have gotten 
powerful enough to handle multiple protocols.

I'm still not getting what you're missing here.  

No Bert. Interoperability, scalability and extensibility were at
the heart of the discussion.

But those are empty words, if you don't understand how they are implemented in 
the real world.

The IETF represents everyone. The ATSC was a private club

Well, okay, I'll buy that much. Anyone can participate in any IETF working 
group. It's just that those who do have reasons to do so. That's why, for 
instance, Cisco is so heavily represented, and also service providers from 
around the world.

But ATSC receivers are outdated and broadcasters are not
able to offer improved services without starting over.

Bull. When ATSC 2.0 came out, no one had to start over.

FACT. No existing ATSC receiver embedded in a TV supports
ATSC 2.0.

Look at how annoying you are when you argue, Craig. The FACT is, a new type of 
service *was* made available, *without* having to "start over," as you said. 
This is because the ATSC standard is extensible. Whether that new service is 
used or not is totally immaterial. The Internet has pretty much taken care of 
mobile reception, without being limited by the one-way broadcast constraint, so 
yeah, not much demand for ATSC-MH (or DVB-H).

All the broadcasters need to do is develop a new receiver
and include the updated streams in their multiplex.

Another ATSC-MH? See, I disagree. The one-way broadcast restriction is 
something that users have gotten away from. Broadcasters need to find a real 
Internet role.

They would be crazy NOT TO jump on the Internet bandwagon, as
it both complements (TVE) and competes (Netflix et al) with the
MVPDs.

We've been over this circle many times. The content owners are seeing people 
bail out of legacy schemes, Craig. That's what makes them adopt new techniques. 
And they see especially the younger crowd using other media. Big incentives 
there, Craig.

The other changes, like ad supported catch-up services, is a fundamental
change to their business model. This was forced by the reality that
increased choice has drastically reduced the size of their once dominant
audience share, and people can now choose when they want to watch rather
than making appointments.

No one calls it "catch up service" anymore, Craig. It's on demand. The shows 
are even advertised that way now. Live or on demand. Can't do on demand with 
one-way broadcast, Craig, unless you resort to old tech recorders.

Yes, they are supporting the Sling experiment in a very limited fashion.

Just the beginning of this trend. No matter how you try to twist this, the 
simple fact is that being on the Internet makes the content owners more 
competitive and less in collusion. And the simple reason is, the medium is 
two-way (supporting multiple sources), and neutral.

Bert


 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: