[opendtv] Re: FCC CHAIRMAN PROPOSAL TO UNLOCK THE SET-TOP BOX: CREATING CHOICE & INNOVATION

  • From: Craig Birkmaier <brewmastercraig@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2016 09:46:36 -0500

On Feb 18, 2016, at 10:31 PM, Manfredi, Albert E <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx> 
wrote:

Craig, you may have had an excuse back in the early 1990s, for not knowing 
how the Internet works, but we are 20+ years on. You should know, by now, 
that the IP stack alone, in your IP appliance, is not enough to decode 
messages. By now, you should be aware of the fact that you need something 
more, like in this case, a media player, to decode the video. Or perhaps a 
web browser. Or a web browser plus plug-ins. Or a word processor app. Or a 
spreadsheet app. Or an email client.

You are wasting our time stating the obvious Bert. I already explained all of 
this several days ago when you tried to claim that corporations set end-to-end 
"network" standards by standardizing on various office productivity 
applications.

But you are doing a great job making my case that we do not need end-to-end 
standards for TV. If apps that lie at the top layer of the IP stack (or simply 
ride atop the stack) are responsible for the wonders of streaming video, the 
same apps can be used to enable video streams delivered by the "broadcast 
stack."

In fact they do. This exactly what is happening with Apps on the little boxes 
you despise. Broadcasters could easily do EXACTLY the same with apps that 
pulled content from their broadcast multiplex.

That's why what you were claiming back then is simply not true. To provide a 
service, such as TV, it takes more than just the digital pipe. I think almost 
anyone who uses the Internet knows this intuitively, by now.

Again, we've already beat this to death. Broadcasting is just a one-way pipe, 
and can deliver video streams that are identical to those traveling over the 
Internet. It does not matter what kind of communications is going on at lower 
levels of each "network." The application and data in the video streams can be 
identical.

The applications layers of all forms of digital networks evolved without
the need for end-to-end standards.

Simplistic, and misses the point. Whatever SERVICE you want to provide, it 
requires more than just the pipe. So if your company wants to do business on 
the Web, it expects YOU to have a compatible browser. There are many browsers 
out there, and you must install one that works (and not all work every time).

What do you think I am talking about when I write: APPLICATIONS LAYER?

A browser is the interface between the web and the content. No big deal. And 
yes, not all browsers are created equal. Microsoft got in big trouble trying to 
dominate that market and develop a back end that only worked with Internet 
Explorer.

This is what the ATSC and DVB had to do. They had to establish *a standard* 
to allow every single set out there to decode the broadcast, from the very 
first day. Plus, had the receivers NOT supported that one standard, then the 
broadcaster would have had to waste spectrum simulcasting over many channels. 
Obviously, they don't want to waste their spectrum.

That is what they CHOSE to do. They did this to control the standards, embed 
their IP, generate ongoing royalty streams, and protect regional markets.

You are simply wrong about the need for one standard. You use more than one to 
decode video streams from different OTT sites. 

This is just a question of philosophy and control/protectionism.

We were not comparing broadcast DTV with the Internet Bert.

You certainly were, and you continue to do so.

I was speaking specifically about the work of the Task Force, which was 
necessarily limited by the "Internet" that existed in 1992. As I clearly 
stated, we were advising ACATS about the way digital systems work and how a 
layered standard for TV broadcasting could be implemented.

The "framework" still required end to end standards, because it had to land 
on its feet. The fact that your upper layer apps might evolve over time is an 
orthogonal discussion. You still cannot leave those apps open for grabs, if 
you are deploying a TV broadcast service that has to work.

No Bert. Interoperability, scalability and extensibility were at the heart of 
the discussion. Simply stated, it was the philosophical battle between another 
end-to-end, closed, dead-end TV standard and the open systems we all use and 
enjoy today. 

Do you belong to any IETF group, Craig? Once again, you say no, but in fact, 
you don't know. Every new draft document presented to an IETF working group 
is presented by either an equipment vendor or by a service provider, who 
wants to get some new feature implemented. These people always have a vested 
interest, or they would be playing golf instead. There's no difference from 
the ATSC, in this regard, at all.

Yes Bert. I understand how the process works. But we are talking Apples and 
Oranges. The IETF represents everyone. The ATSC was a private club designing a 
standard to enrich the members of the club.

And more important, the IETF approach standardizes AFTER the equipment vendors 
and service providers have demonstrated the need for a standard - in most 
cases, the products and IP they are promoting have already been used by 
millions of people. 

The IETF does create some new enabling standards, like IPv6, but these rarely 
are contested or controversial. Standards like HTML5, do involve picking 
winners and losers, as is the case in most standards development. But everyone 
can play - it's not a membership club with a high cost to join.

But ATSC receivers are outdated and broadcasters are not able
to offer improved services without starting over.

Bull. When ATSC 2.0 came out, no one had to start over.

FACT. No existing ATSC receiver embedded in a TV supports ATSC 2.0.

And there's plenty that can be done with ATSC 1.0, to support new services. 
Yes, perhaps the ATSC could have mandated remote upgradeability of receivers, 
but even that is not a big deal so much anymore. With HDMI interfaces to 
modern TV sets, or STBs, upgrades could be introduced whenever, for pretty 
cheap. The real problem is that the one-way broadcast pipe is so limiting 
that *users* aren't demanding any huge innovations. Did anyone care about 
3DTV? Not really. UHD? Maybe, and ATSC 1.0 can easily support that, with a 
couple of new packet formats, and H.265


All true. All the broadcasters need to do is develop a new receiver and include 
the updated streams in their multiplex.

That's called starting over, as NOTHING out there in existing TVs support any 
of the above. Fortunately, it can be done with a cheap dongle or STB connected 
to the HDMI port of a TV.

The content owners are being far more competitive than in your walled garden 
days, Craig.

Funny thing about that Bert. The content owners took over the MVPDs via retrans 
consent, because it was the only game in town at the time. Actually that's not 
true, because they were ALSO taking advantage of packaged media to sell/rent 
their library content.

They would be crazy NOT TO jump on the Internet bandwagon, as it both 
complements (TVE) and competes (Netflix et al) with the MVPDs. The only real 
change relative to the earlier world of MVPD and packaged media,is that the 
Internet is replacing packaged media and providing fertile ground for the 
content owners to sell their library content. 

The other changes, like ad supported catch-up services, is a fundamental change 
to their business model. This was forced by the reality that increased choice 
has drastically reduced the size of their once dominant audience share, and 
people can now choose when they want to watch rather than making appointments.

That's the direction they are moving. Here's a  : Les Moonves is selling his 
stuff on his own, counting only the existence of a neutral pipe. Some of his 
stuff is ad supported only, some requires a small monthly fee. In doing this, 
he is not colluding with ABC, NBC, Fox, and others, to be included in some 
basic "bundle.

CBS et al, have been selling their stuff for many decades. Nothing new here 
other than the underlying technologies.

And yes, Les is trying to sell CBS and access to their library for a LARGE 
monthly fee, when compared to what they get in retrans fees from the MVPDs. 
Let's see if this even works in the long term - to date they refuse to tell us 
if it is working at all. How about some subscriber numbers please...

And as long as subscribers leave from the walled gardens, as long as people 
are opting out more than opting in, this will continue to occur.

It will occur regardless of what happens with the subscriber rates of the MVPDs 
Bert. The content owners are in the business of selling their content to ANYONE 
who can write big checks. It's called competition.

What you are unable to comprehend is that the content owners are controlling 
the growth of their business in a manner that allows them to sell to more 
competitors without undermining the business models that are working.

You note that CBS is not colluding with ABC, NBC, Fox and others to be included 
in some basic "bundle." 

They do not need to...

The bundle is an extension of the old broadcast oligopoly - when you had to 
make appointments to watch the OTA broadcasts of each call letter network. The 
call letter networks have become a channel within a bundle of networks 
controlled by the parent congloms. 

Each conglom REQUIRES the MVPDs to buy all of these channels to get the few 
that most people actually watch. The reason that we are not seeing more 
affordable VMVPD bundles is that the congloms refuse to sell individual 
networks to Apple, Google, Amazon et al. 

Yes, they are supporting the Sling experiment in a very limited fashion. The 
broadcast networks are not available with Sling, nor are many other popular 
networks. So Sling is not a real threat to the MVPD bundles.

And even others, including John Skipper, are heading in this direction. 
Skipper already uses the much cheaper Sling TV service, and has mentioned 
that more direct to consumer may happen in the future.

Skippers boss says there are no plans to go direct any time soon. Yes you can 
get ESPN with Sling - apparently there are some sports fans out there willing 
to pay $20/mo for the privilege. How about some subscriber numbers please...

Bert




----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: