[opendtv] Re: FCC CHAIRMAN PROPOSAL TO UNLOCK THE SET-TOP BOX: CREATING CHOICE & INNOVATION

  • From: "Manfredi, Albert E" <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2016 03:31:58 +0000

Craig Birkmaier wrote:

Not really.

All this proves is my statement that historically, television
standards were chosen by governments primarily concerned with
protectionism.

Craig, you may have had an excuse back in the early 1990s, for not knowing how 
the Internet works, but we are 20+ years on. You should know, by now, that the 
IP stack alone, in your IP appliance, is not enough to decode messages. By now, 
you should be aware of the fact that you need something more, like in this 
case, a media player, to decode the video. Or perhaps a web browser. Or a web 
browser plus plug-ins. Or a word processor app. Or a spreadsheet app. Or an 
email client.

That's why what you were claiming back then is simply not true. To provide a 
service, such as TV, it takes more than just the digital pipe. I think almost 
anyone who uses the Internet knows this intuitively, by now.

This all boils down to philosophical issues.

Not at all. It boils down to building a model, in your head, for how these 
systems are put together. The digital pipe alone is not enough.

The applications layers of all forms of digital networks evolved without
the need for end-to-end standards.

Simplistic, and misses the point. Whatever SERVICE you want to provide, it 
requires more than just the pipe. So if your company wants to do business on 
the Web, it expects YOU to have a compatible browser. There are many browsers 
out there, and you must install one that works (and not all work every time).

This is what the ATSC and DVB had to do. They had to establish *a standard* to 
allow every single set out there to decode the broadcast, from the very first 
day. Plus, had the receivers NOT supported that one standard, then the 
broadcaster would have had to waste spectrum simulcasting over many channels. 
Obviously, they don't want to waste their spectrum.

We were not comparing broadcast DTV with the Internet Bert.

You certainly were, and you continue to do so. The "framework" still required 
end to end standards, because it had to land on its feet. The fact that your 
upper layer apps might evolve over time is an orthogonal discussion. You still 
cannot leave those apps open for grabs, if you are deploying a TV broadcast 
service that has to work.

The ATSC was a consortium of vested interests

Exactly the same as the IETF.

Nope.

Do you belong to any IETF group, Craig? Once again, you say no, but in fact, 
you don't know. Every new draft document presented to an IETF working group is 
presented by either an equipment vendor or by a service provider, who wants to 
get some new feature implemented. These people always have a vested interest, 
or they would be playing golf instead. There's no difference from the ATSC, in 
this regard, at all.

But ATSC receivers are outdated and broadcasters are not able
to offer improved services without starting over.

Bull. When ATSC 2.0 came out, no one had to start over. And there's plenty that 
can be done with ATSC 1.0, to support new services. Yes, perhaps the ATSC could 
have mandated remote upgradeability of receivers, but even that is not a big 
deal so much anymore. With HDMI interfaces to modern TV sets, or STBs, upgrades 
could be introduced whenever, for pretty cheap. The real problem is that the 
one-way broadcast pipe is so limiting that *users* aren't demanding any huge 
innovations. Did anyone care about 3DTV? Not really. UHD? Maybe, and ATSC 1.0 
can easily support that, with a couple of new packet formats, and H.265.

We can agree that the content owners are moving; we disagree
on what they are moving to.

The content owners are being far more competitive than in your walled garden 
days, Craig. That's the direction they are moving. Here's a clue: Les Moonves 
is selling his stuff on his own, counting only the existence of a neutral pipe. 
Some of his stuff is ad supported only, some requires a small monthly fee. In 
doing this, he is not colluding with ABC, NBC, Fox, and others, to be included 
in some basic "bundle."

And as long as subscribers leave from the walled gardens, as long as people are 
opting out more than opting in, this will continue to occur. And even others, 
including John Skipper, are heading in this direction. Skipper already uses the 
much cheaper Sling TV service, and has mentioned that more direct to consumer 
may happen in the future.

Bert


 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: