[opendtv] Re: FCC CHAIRMAN PROPOSAL TO UNLOCK THE SET-TOP BOX: CREATING CHOICE & INNOVATION

  • From: Craig Birkmaier <brewmastercraig@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Thu, 18 Feb 2016 08:40:16 -0500

On Feb 17, 2016, at 10:18 PM, Manfredi, Albert E <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx> 
wrote:


History proved that your understanding of the problem, and your apparent 
desire to describe it in Internet terms, was flawed, Craig. No DTT service 
was deployed as you were describing, anywhere in the world. You needed to 
think in terms of what enterprise net managers have to do, to provide a 
complete service.

Not really.

All this proves is my statement that historically, television standards were 
chosen by governments primarily concerned with protectionism. Just look at all 
the analog television standards - from Wiki:

For example, the United States uses NTSC-M, the UK uses PAL-I, France uses 
SECAM-L, much of Western Europe and Australia uses PAL-B/G, most of Eastern 
Europe uses PAL-D/K or SECAM-D/K and so on.


Much the same has happened with digital standards where (and when) they have 
been deployed. Wiki again:
The transition to digital television is a process that is happening at 
different paces around the world. Although digital satellite television is 
now commonplace, the switch to digital cable and terrestrial television has 
taken longer. 

Not all countries are compatible within each standard DVB-T, ATSC (North 
America), DMB(China), ISDB (of which there are two incompatible variations 
used in Japan and South America respectively). Countries that have adopted 
digital terrestrial recently may have a single MPEG4 based system for SD and 
HD, while countries with more established system may use MPEG2 for SD and 
MPEG4 for HD. There are also variations in middleware used. For example, 
Italy, Ireland and the UK are all DVB-T regions, but Ireland uses "MPEG4 + 
MHEG5 + DVB-T" for both SD and HD transmissions, while the UK uses "MPEG2 + 
MHEG5 + DVB-T" for SD and "MPEG4 + MHEG5 + DVB-T2" for HDTV, and Italy uses 
MHP rather than MHEG5 middleware. Since all MPEG4-capable receivers can 
decode the MPEG2 codec and all DVB-T2 tuners are capable of tuning DVB-T 
signals, UK HD set-top boxes are compatible with both the UK SD system and 
Irish SD/HD system, but Irish SD/HD tuners will only work with the SD system 
used in the UK. Digital cable broadcast tends to be DVB-C or very similar QAM 
in almost all countries. Broadband on cable is mostly DOCSIS which is DVB-C 
on the download path. This is important when buying a TV or set-box online 
rather than from a local retailer who would normally only stock the 
compatible system. Incompatible retail products are a severe problem in 
emerging retail digital markets where a neighbouring country has an older 
standard and dominates the retail trade, such as UK Freeview (rather than 
compatible "Freeview HD") products in Ireland.

So much for integrated DTV tuner standards Bert. Obviously this stuff does not 
need to be locked down. Much of the world relies on external receiver boxes, 
and still there are a wide range of devices, using a range of standards that 
protect local markets and implement evolving standards as these markets begin 
digital broadcasting.

This all boils down to philosophical issues. There is no reason to use 
end-to-end standards, as the record clearly demonstrates.

As far as I can tell, you are the one to have misunderstood the problem. I 
have no idea what the others were saying. If they say what you claim they 
said, they were clearly wrong too.

Obviously not. Just a bit ahead of our time.

The Internet was an important example of how things would play out,

More importantly, in the early 1990s, there was no streaming media over the 
Internet. Aside from the slow links, media streams didn't exist before RFC 
1889, dated January 1996. For many years, this was only used for audio. And 
guess what, Craig? Audio reception required something more than just the 
pipe. Like, Real Media Player. Remember?

Thanks for making my case Bert. The applications layers of all forms of digital 
networks evolved without the need for end-to-end standards. And the devices 
that connected to these networks evolved as needed, driven by Moore's Law and 
the demands of the more sophisticated applications that Moore's Law enabled.

By the way, we knew this would be the case, and predicted this outcome in 1992. 
This did not take any special intelligence or training - it was obvious.

THIS is how it "played out," Craig. (1) It takes more than just the pipe. (2) 
In the early 1990s, if you were trying to compare broadcast DTV with the 
Internet, you were mostly blowing smoke. Something I've tried to get across 
for years.

We were not comparing broadcast DTV with the Internet Bert. We were laying out 
a framework for digital television based on what "being digital" enabled and 
how to properly architect future digital imaging standards - not just for 
broadcast TV...

For everything.

It was obvious that the lower layer network standards would evolve along 
multiple different paths, even within the television industry; one-way 
terrestrial broadcast would be different than digital cable, which would be 
different from DBS. Likewise wireless telephony would be different than wired 
hybrid fiber/coax, which would be different than FIOS.

But at the higher layers everything would converge, as "being digital" allows 
devices to be designed and programmed to support multiple applications that can 
process bits. 

The smart phone is a classic example of this convergence, not to mention proof 
that we were correct. 

When the DTV standard was adopted the ability to acquire HDTV images, process 
them to create programs, and encode and distribute these programs required 
several million dollars of equipment. Today's $700 smart phones can acquire 4K 
video, edit that video, encode it, then deliver it anywhere in the world via 
the Internet.

The ATSC was a consortium of vested interests

Exactly the same as the IETF.

Nope. 

Yes, after the marketplace has demonstrates the need for an IETF standard, the 
vested interests and experts work together to develop it. If existing products 
- like Adobe Flash - offer a clearly superior solution the standard may reflect 
this. But typically, new standards like HTML5 emerge with "best of" solutions 
from multiple contributors.

Contrast this with the ATSC, which focused efforts on embedding the IP of its 
members, while rejecting superior solutions. COFDM is an excellent example; 
Interlaced HDTV is another

Exactly the same as the IEEE standards working groups. Yes, the IETF and IEEE 
look globally, whereas the TV industry simply didn't know how to do that.

Bull. 

The TV industry knew how to do it. We pointed the way. That scared them to 
death. 

So they pulled back inside their shells and PURPOSELY tried to build protective 
barriers to interoperability, while embedding the legacy technologies they had 
invested in. 

It was an interesting short term solution with disastrous long term results. 
Most of the companies that were building the multi-million dollar HDTV 
infrastructure are out of business or a shadow of their former selves. Just 
look at Sony.

See above: you simply did not know.

Wrong. It was already happening in the labs of the companies represented on the 
Task force.

Plus, the way these media streams were eventually sent through the Internet 
was unicast transmissions over a two-way network, using a client-server 
model. Not applicable to broadcast TV.

Irrelevant - that's just lower layer minutiae. 

However in spite of it all, the differences were not great. MPEG-2 TS is a 
perfectly reasonable way to carry synchronous streams over a broadcast pipe 
(or for that matter also over the Internet), and mandating a certain set of 
standard formats for TV and guide service is *totally reasonable*.

Agreed. That's why we recommended that the FCC adopt the transport layer into 
the standard.

Just like having to use Real Media for those early online radio streams. How 
do you *still* miss this? Yes, anyone could install Real Media on their PCs. 
But PCs cost a whole lot more than what ATSC receivers were aiming for.

Irrelevant again. Just a philosophical difference. You pay a little more up 
front for an open platform that can evolve; and you may need to replace it 
periodically to deal with performance issues/improvements. You can drive the 
price down for a closed system over time thanks to Moore's Law - thus ATSC 
receivers are cheap today...

So are PCs.

But ATSC receivers are outdated and broadcasters are not able to offer improved 
services without starting over.

A more forward thinking FCC and Congress would have reduced the
spectrum allocation for existing broadcasters to 2 MHz,

Of course, that would be your position. Limit the spectrum to at most SDTV 
quality, one stream at most, to more quickly force people onto Craig's 
favorite walled gardens. Anything to cripple any kind of neutral service. 
That's a forward thinking approach.

No Bert. Broadcasters have enjoyed a privileged free ride - a protected 
oligopoly. 

In 1986 they asked the government to DOUBLE the spectrum they were allocated to 
offer analog HDTV.  They did not expect they would ever need to deliver HDTV - 
they were trying to protect the spectrum allocated to TV broadcasting from the 
advancing land mobile hoards.

After General Instruments demonstrated digital compression the rules of the 
game changed; NTSC quality could be delivered in 2 MHz, and HDTV in one 6 MHz 
channel.  Broadcasters feared that Congress could preserve the existing 
broadcast franchise, reducing broadcast channels to 2 MHz, and recover a huge 
chunk of spectrum immediately. So they had no choice but to demand they be 
allowed to bring the wonders of HDTV to the relatively small percentage of 
homes still using antennas. 

Even as the DTV standard was being developed the broadcasters got their "pound 
of flesh."  The 1992 Cable Act turned a broadcast TV license into a new pot of 
gold with retransmission consent.

Broadcasters spent about 2 billion, over a decade, to build out the DTV 
infrastructure. The cable industry spent more than that each year upgrading old 
analog cable systems - a total of more than $85 billion by 2004. 

And now the government is about to pay some broadcasters billions to vacate 
spectrum they did not pay for.

Need I mention that you now prefer Internet streaming to use of the ATSC tuner 
in your TV?

HDTV needed 6 MHz channels.

Right. So forbid that. HDTV should be banned.

No. Require that. Which is what happened. We were not allowed to discuss SDTV 
at all, until it was clear the standard would be adopted; then it came in 
through the back door.

Meanwhile in Europe, DVB

Meanwhile in Europe, they missed their window of opportunity, and DTT HDTV is 
still rare as a result. It has to be simulcast still, over constrained 
spectrum.

They did not miss a thing. They deployed a digital SDTV system that delivered 
most of the quality improvements of HDTV from day one - keep in mind the 
average size of TV displays in Europe during this time frame. As HD displays 
became affordable sources of HD programming proliferated, including terrestrial 
options.

Europe is still dominated by state broadcasters. Most people moved on to 
alternatives that offered more choice, including the Internet.

No, Craig. This is what you seem to champion, but it's not the trend. That's 
why you call existing IP unwalled alternatives "doom and gloom." That's why 
you swear by limited-use boxes created out of pure collusion. The content 
owners might not move as fast as I would like them to, but they are 
definitely not stuck in the mud.

We can agree that the content owners are moving; we disagree on what they are 
moving to.

Here's a clue. Your buddy Les wants you to pay $5.99/mo for CBS All Access. 
Your free options are slowly disappearing...

Regards
Craig

Other related posts: