[opendtv] Re: FCC CHAIRMAN PROPOSAL TO UNLOCK THE SET-TOP BOX: CREATING CHOICE & INNOVATION

  • From: "Manfredi, Albert E" <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Thu, 18 Feb 2016 03:18:28 +0000

Craig Birkmaier wrote:

We disagree. History has proven our position was correct, while your
end-to-end approach was a DEAD-END.

History proved that your understanding of the problem, and your apparent desire 
to describe it in Internet terms, was flawed, Craig. No DTT service was 
deployed as you were describing, anywhere in the world. You needed to think in 
terms of what enterprise net managers have to do, to provide a complete service.

I can provide you with a list of the engineers and scientists who
participated in the task force Bert.

As far as I can tell, you are the one to have misunderstood the problem. I have 
no idea what the others were saying. If they say what you claim they said, they 
were clearly wrong too.

The Internet was an important example of how things would play out,

You did not know, Craig. Comparison with the Internet was wrong. TV has to 
provide an end to end service, just like a corporate intranet does with email 
and many other apps. Just providing the digital pipe is not enough, for a TV 
service or any other service. I've explained this to you countless times, so it 
would be nice not to always go back to square 1. And the Internet had been 
around for a decade or so, by then. So it's not like it didn't exist yet.

More importantly, in the early 1990s, there was no streaming media over the 
Internet. Aside from the slow links, media streams didn't exist before RFC 
1889, dated January 1996. For many years, this was only used for audio. And 
guess what, Craig? Audio reception required something more than just the pipe. 
Like, Real Media Player. Remember?

THIS is how it "played out," Craig. (1) It takes more than just the pipe. (2) 
In the early 1990s, if you were trying to compare broadcast DTV with the 
Internet, you were mostly blowing smoke. Something I've tried to get across for 
years.

The ATSC was a consortium of vested interests

Exactly the same as the IETF. Exactly the same as the IEEE standards working 
groups. Yes, the IETF and IEEE look globally, whereas the TV industry simply 
didn't know how to do that. But all of these organizations are made up of 
people/companies with vested interest, Craig. They all try to get their ideas 
out, to benefit from their work.

And as I pointed out, everything needed for broadcasters to
use different technologies and formats at the higher layers
WAS HAPPENING in parallel on the Internet.

See above: you simply did not know. Plus, the way these media streams were 
eventually sent through the Internet was unicast transmissions over a two-way 
network, using a client-server model. Not applicable to broadcast TV. However 
in spite of it all, the differences were not great. MPEG-2 TS is a perfectly 
reasonable way to carry synchronous streams over a broadcast pipe (or for that 
matter also over the Internet), and mandating a certain set of standard formats 
for TV and guide service is *totally reasonable*. Just like having to use Real 
Media for those early online radio streams. How do you *still* miss this? Yes, 
anyone could install Real Media on their PCs. But PCs cost a whole lot more 
than what ATSC receivers were aiming for.

A more forward thinking FCC and Congress would have reduced the
spectrum allocation for existing broadcasters to 2 MHz,

Of course, that would be your position. Limit the spectrum to at most SDTV 
quality, one stream at most, to more quickly force people onto Craig's favorite 
walled gardens. Anything to cripple any kind of neutral service. That's a 
forward thinking approach.

HDTV needed 6 MHz channels.

Right. So forbid that. HDTV should be banned.

Meanwhile in Europe, DVB

Meanwhile in Europe, they missed their window of opportunity, and DTT HDTV is 
still rare as a result. It has to be simulcast still, over constrained spectrum.

If broadcasters really wanted to get back into the game, they
could create their own $39 dongle and

So what? They can do this, and then TV manufacturers will quickly build it in, 
for maybe $10. Anything you can build as a separate device can and will become 
embedded, as TV manufacturers want to differentiate their products. This is 
trivia, Craig.

And you were wrong.

I predicted the price, down to the dollar. You were, from the start, in 
nay-sayer mode, so anything you could latch onto, real or make-believe, you did.

Now the FCC can sit back and relax, and let the steady migration to IP, for TVE 
and OTT services, do all the hard work for them. And for some reason, Craig 
finds this hard to swallow.

Oh, I see. So, since lemmings keep paying for their TV, let's
make damned sure to give them no other choice.

That's the trend Bert.

No, Craig. This is what you seem to champion, but it's not the trend. That's 
why you call existing IP unwalled alternatives "doom and gloom." That's why you 
swear by limited-use boxes created out of pure collusion. The content owners 
might not move as fast as I would like them to, but they are definitely not 
stuck in the mud.

Bert


 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: