[opendtv] Re: FCC CHAIRMAN PROPOSAL TO UNLOCK THE SET-TOP BOX: CREATING CHOICE & INNOVATION

  • From: Craig Birkmaier <brewmastercraig@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Wed, 17 Feb 2016 08:56:04 -0500

On Feb 16, 2016, at 10:37 PM, Manfredi, Albert E <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx> 
wrote:

No doubt the lawyers at the FCC expected another end-to-end standard.

No doubt, anyone making recommendations should have understood this much. If 
I thought the FCC was NOT asking for an end to end standard, which is what 
you apparently thought, I would have taken them to task. For (advanced) 
broadcast TV to households, an end to end solution is a must. This is not to 
say that the initial end to end standard had to remain frozen. Once digital 
distribution had been decided, 1991, upgradeability of the standard became 
obvious.

We disagree. History has proven our position was correct, while your end-to-end 
approach was a DEAD-END.

Many of those meetings were held in an attempt to educate them on the
realities of  how a digital standard could be structured to enable
interoperability,

You keep repeating these things, Craig, but I have become convinced that 
first, you guys needed to educate yourselves on these matters.

FOTFL

Just how much digital network development work had you ever done, Craig?

I can provide you with a list of the engineers and scientists who participated 
in the task force Bert. Unfortunately, although these were some of the top 
people in the field, it won't shut you up.

It seems to me that you were on the wrong track, making inappropriate 
comparisons with the Internet, and coming to incorrect conclusions as a 
result.

These were the people who were behind the digital revolution Bert. The Internet 
was an important example of how things would play out, but at the time is was 
still in its infancy - as you note, it was primarily used to move e-mail and 
relatively small files around. What was more relevant was the way digital 
technologies and devices were evolving, and the layered approach to standards 
for digital media.

The goals of the ATSC process were different from the goals of the IETF work, 
even if "digital" appears in the description of the data carriage medium. 
Since you have stated many times that to you, ATSC is a "point solution," 
confound it Craig, you just didn't get it. I've pointed this out countless 
times.

The goals of the ATSC were VERY DIFFERENT than those of the IETF. 

The ATSC was a consortium of vested interests trying to control the future of 
broadcasting not only in the U.S., but in as much of the rest of the world as 
possible. There was no presumption of enabling global standards like the IETF; 
this was a battle with the the forces behind DVB, a battle that had been 
ongoing for more than five decades. This battle had its origins in 
protectionism - of regional markets and proprietary technologies that could be 
advanced by government mandated standards.

Yes, the ATSC standard was a point solution. That's the point! 

The goal was to entrench the technologies of the companies that paid for the 
standard; the reward was a government mandate to use that standard and force 
millions of consumers to buy something they did not need and never used.

And as I pointed out, everything needed for broadcasters to use
different technologies and formats at the higher layers WAS
HAPPENING in parallel on the Internet.

Once again, apples and oranges.

No Bert. They are one and the same once you get above the modulation and 
transport layers. The application is delivering streams of audio and video.

The Internet is not a one-way broadcast medium.

Totally irrelevant. You are talking about media and application specific 
differences that are handled at higher layers of the stack. In the end, the 
goal is to deliver bits that represent video content to a device that can 
display the content.

So if you pointed out what you claim to have, to the FCC, I would have 
dismissed your comments as being inapplicable to this broadcast TV issue.

Of course you would have. What we proposed was a visionary leap, albeit a 
relatively small one. The FCC was faced with a decision about an industry it 
regulated that was in full PROTECTION mode; an industry that had insulated 
itself from evolutionary change for fifty years. 

An industry that DEMANDED more spectrum to deliver HDTV to keep the FCC from 
reclaiming spectrum that was being vastly underutilized. In the end, going 
digital did just the opposite - they lost spectrum after 1995, and they are 
about to be PAID a huge amount of money to vacate more spectrum.

A more forward thinking FCC and Congress would have reduced the spectrum 
allocation for existing broadcasters to 2 MHz, which would have been adequate 
to support one SDTV stream to replace the existing NTSC stream.

In fact, this was being proposed after Sikes insisted the new standard be 
digital. That is why the Advisory committee and ATSC refused to even discuss 
SDTV formats until AFTER congress authorized the DTV transition in 1995 - HDTV 
needed 6 MHz channels. 

Meanwhile in Europe, DVB recognized the folly of trying to deliver HDTV at that 
time; they optimized DVB-T to deliver the full quality of the 625 line digital 
formats already being used by European broadcasters. This enabled broadcasters 
to deliver many new services like OnDigital which begat Freeview; and an OTA 
"cable equivalent" in Germany. As the display technology for HDTV matured a 
decade later, it was a simple upgrade to support HDTV formats.

Why is it that you do not understand that everything needed to
implement modern streaming video standards is available in a $39
HDMI dongle.

This is trivia, Craig.

No Bert. It is reality.

If broadcasters really wanted to get back into the game, they could create 
their own $39 dongle and vastly improve the OTA service. But they are perfectly 
content letting the MVPDs deliver their programming, and getting paid for the 
privilege.

As a good friend, who spent his entire career as a broadcast engineers and exec 
at a large station group likes to say - the DTV standard provided a high 
quality STL to get their content to the MVPD head ends. We graduated from 
college the same year (1970) - his senior thesis was why broadcasters should be 
compensated for their signals by the cable companies.

Even if the receiver is built in, which most people BY FAR prefer, your 
much-ballyhooed dongle can be used later on, if required, for updated 
receivers. You can safely drop this argument, Craig. It tends to derail your 
thinking about the more important issues.

This is an oxymoron Bert. Why build in something people probably won't use, 
then add something later to make it useful? There is simply no reason anymore 
to build this stuff into displays. 

Yes, when the ATSC standard was adopted, there were huge concerns
about the cost to implement the receivers.

BS. Don't even try this. I told you from day 1 that receivers would be super 
cheap by 2006.

And you were wrong. But only marginally wrong. Decent affordable receivers 
appeared in 2008.

The only ones who persistently opposed the obvious were people with an axe to 
grind. By those days, Murphy's Law had been well understood, even by laymen. 
We had all manner of super complicated designs in silicon by then, such as 
FDDI for instance, to know how the prices fall once the silicon is mass 
produced. Even for silicon which controls complicated processes. Huge 
concerns my foot.

Murphy's law is an adage or epigram that is typically stated as: Anything that 
can go wrong, will go wrong.

A good analogy to the ATSC standard?

When the standard was approved in 1995 there were huge concerns about the cost. 
Obviously Moore's Law was able to address these issues in time. 

One of the reasons that DVB-T DID NOT include HDTV from the beginning was 
related to these cost concerns. The memory requirements for an MPEG-2 MP@ML 
decoder were a fraction of what was required for a MP@HL decoder. And they 
assumed (correctly) that for the first 5-10 years interlaced CRT displays would 
be the norm - i.e. no expensive deinterlacing chip required in the receiver.

On Digital launched in the UK in 1998; it became Freeview in 2002 and quickly 
attracted a large percentage of UK viewers.

Meanwhile, here in the U.S. most stations did not begin digital broadcasts 
until the early 2000's. We did not get DTV broadcasts here in Gainesville until 
the fall of 2006.

And it continues to be TOTALLY IRRELEVANT. At best, only a few
million of these PCs are used as front ends for the TV in the
family room, or any other room for that matter.

Give it up, Craig. The PC is still the device used most for streaming, 
whatever it may or may not be connected to.

All those government employees in DC working "hard" as usual...

PCs are not dominant in terms of streaming entertainment content anymore.

Give it up.

And as we have seen many, many times, the surveys are too often ambiguous. 
The questions asked are ambiguous, and therefore the answers received are 
ambiguous.

Exactly. The reason for that ambiguity is that "video" has evolved and grown in 
many new directions. And almost everyone carries a high quality digital still 
and video camera in their pocket or purse.

I do not expect a broadcaster to stream the millions of "how to" videos 
available via YouTube. I don't expect them to stream cute cat videos either, 
but for some reason we see "trending videos" on entertainment TV all the time 
now. 

People use PCs and mobile devices to videoconference these days. The videophone 
that AT&T demonstrated at the 1964 World's Fair in New York is now a reality. 
You can see what's going on at your local bar via their webcam.

Traditional TV entertainment is delivered in many ways - FOTA, MVPDs, packaged 
media, and Internet streaming.

In other words, there's a lot more going on than just measuring how many people 
are watching entertainment programming on each of the devices that can access 
that content. 

Clearly, however, the little boxes you despise are used for to watch 
entertainment far more than PCs.

You are clueless. People have been paying for TV entertainment
for many decades.

Oh, I see. So, since lemmings keep paying for their TV, let's make damned 
sure to give them no other choice.

That's the trend Bert.

FOTA will survive as long as the political will props it up.
 
And ad supported OTT sites will continue to serve the legacy holdouts like you.

Entertainment is one of the largest industries in the U.S. Bert. The "lemmings" 
seem to find a few hundred billion discretionary dollars to pay for it each 
year.

Once again, if the content owners feel this way, and try that tack, fine. 
Although we see that these content owners do offer options, so evidently, 
they don't have your tunnel vision.

The trend is to move the most valuable stuff behind pay walls.

For the CE vendors to get in bed with the pay services, and work against 
their customer's best interest, is not fine. Collusion is not fine, Craig, no 
matter how many absurd attempts you make to justify it.

It's just business Bert. Get over it.

If KNR TV in Greenland is willing to transmit their TV programming over the 
Internet, the only sensible question to ask is why the box you pay good money 
for is busy blocking that content.

It is not blocking that content. I can mirror KNR to my HDTV through my iPAD 
and Apple TV. The reason it is not on the Apple TV menu is that only a handful 
of people in the U.S., like you, even know it exists...or care.


Regards
Craig

Other related posts: