[opendtv] Re: FCC CHAIRMAN PROPOSAL TO UNLOCK THE SET-TOP BOX: CREATING CHOICE & INNOVATION

  • From: "Manfredi, Albert E" <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Wed, 17 Feb 2016 03:37:51 +0000

Craig Birkmaier wrote:

It would be helpful if you would read a message before making
meaningless comments...

It would be helpful if you read the response, instead of jumping in with 
half-baked comments before you read the response. In short, Craig, your 
recommendations, as you describe them, didn't make a lot of sense. The FCC was 
correct to not following them. I would not have followed them either, at least 
as you describe them.

Nothing in the authorization for the Advisory Committee required
the recommendation of an end-to-end standard;

If that's true, it would have been nonsensical. If I had thought that something 
so absurd was being asked for, I would have made darned sure to ask again what 
they wanted and why. You are comparing apples and oranges when you bring up the 
Internet.

No doubt the lawyers at the FCC expected another end-to-end standard.

No doubt, anyone making recommendations should have understood this much. If I 
thought the FCC was NOT asking for an end to end standard, which is what you 
apparently thought, I would have taken them to task. For (advanced) broadcast 
TV to households, an end to end solution is a must. This is not to say that the 
initial end to end standard had to remain frozen. Once digital distribution had 
been decided, 1991, upgradeability of the standard became obvious.

Many of those meetings were held in an attempt to educate them on the
realities of  how a digital standard could be structured to enable
interoperability,

You keep repeating these things, Craig, but I have become convinced that first, 
you guys needed to educate yourselves on these matters. Just how much digital 
network development work had you ever done, Craig? It seems to me that you were 
on the wrong track, making inappropriate comparisons with the Internet, and 
coming to incorrect conclusions as a result. The goals of the ATSC process were 
different from the goals of the IETF work, even if "digital" appears in the 
description of the data carriage medium. Since you have stated many times that 
to you, ATSC is a "point solution," confound it Craig, you just didn't get it. 
I've pointed this out countless times.

And as I pointed out, everything needed for broadcasters to use
different technologies and formats at the higher layers WAS
HAPPENING in parallel on the Internet.

Once again, apples and oranges. The Internet is not a one-way broadcast medium. 
So if you pointed out what you claim to have, to the FCC, I would have 
dismissed your comments as being inapplicable to this broadcast TV issue. I've 
said this too many times, Craig, for you to go back to square 1 each time.

Why is it that you do not understand that everything needed to
implement modern streaming video standards is available in a $39
HDMI dongle.

This is trivia, Craig. Even if the receiver is built in, which most people BY 
FAR prefer, your much-ballyhooed dongle can be used later on, if required, for 
updated receivers. You can safely drop this argument, Craig. It tends to derail 
your thinking about the more important issues.

Yes, when the ATSC standard was adopted, there were huge concerns
about the cost to implement the receivers.

BS. Don't even try this. I told you from day 1 that receivers would be super 
cheap by 2006. The only ones who persistently opposed the obvious were people 
with an axe to grind. By those days, Murphy's Law had been well understood, 
even by laymen. We had all manner of super complicated designs in silicon by 
then, such as FDDI for instance, to know how the prices fall once the silicon 
is mass produced. Even for silicon which controls complicated processes. Huge 
concerns my foot.

And it continues to be TOTALLY IRRELEVANT. At best, only a few
million of these PCs are used as front ends for the TV in the
family room, or any other room for that matter.

Give it up, Craig. The PC is still the device used most for streaming, whatever 
it may or may not be connected to. And as we have seen many, many times, the 
surveys are too often ambiguous. The questions asked are ambiguous, and 
therefore the answers received are ambiguous.

You are clueless. People have been paying for TV entertainment
for many decades.

Oh, I see. So, since lemmings keep paying for their TV, let's make damned sure 
to give them no other choice. Once again, if the content owners feel this way, 
and try that tack, fine. Although we see that these content owners do offer 
options, so evidently, they don't have your tunnel vision.

For the CE vendors to get in bed with the pay services, and work against their 
customer's best interest, is not fine. Collusion is not fine, Craig, no matter 
how many absurd attempts you make to justify it. If KNR TV in Greenland is 
willing to transmit their TV programming over the Internet, the only sensible 
question to ask is why the box you pay good money for is busy blocking that 
content.

Bert


 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: