[opendtv] Re: FCC CHAIRMAN PROPOSAL TO UNLOCK THE SET-TOP BOX: CREATING CHOICE & INNOVATION

  • From: Craig Birkmaier <brewmastercraig@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 08:04:31 -0500

On Feb 15, 2016, at 9:46 PM, Manfredi, Albert E <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx> 
wrote:


Craig Birkmaier wrote:

Exactly analogous to standardizing only modulation and transport for
ATSC.

Which would have been inadequate for the purpose of deploying a new TV 
system. The ATSC process was not just to create the transport. It was to 
deploy a new "TV app," to use the modern vernacular.

It would be helpful if you would read a message before making meaningless 
comments...

Obviously the ATSC wanted to create an end-to-end standard. It is equally 
obvious that we told the FCC that this was not only unnecessary, but a major 
mistake. We recommended that the upper layers be left open to support 
innovation and competition...

Like what was happening with the Internet.

And very soon, corporate networks agreed on more elaborate email
and documentation standards, ...

And none of this had ANYTHING to do with the Internet.

And in this sense, nor did the ATSC process. In other words, Craig, you made 
an inappropriate comparison between apples and oranges. ATSC was to provide 
an end to end TV service. IP's role is providing mainly transport.

No Bert. The FCC appointed an advisory committee to determine the requirements 
for an HDTV standard to replace the analog NTSC standard. Nothing in the 
authorization for the Advisory Committee required the recommendation of an 
end-to-end standard; in fact the initial work was on an ANALOG standard. FCC 
Chairman Al Sikes told the Advisory Committee in 1990 to pursue a digital 
standard. 

No doubt the lawyers at the FCC expected another end-to-end standard. They said 
as much in the many meetings I had with Commissioners and staff.  Many of those 
meetings were held in an attempt to educate them on the realities of  how a 
digital standard could be structured to enable interoperability, scalability 
and extensibility. And why it would be inappropriate to mandate an end-to-end 
standard.

We created the Task Force Report on Digital Image Architecture as an input 
document to Working Party 4 of the Advisory Committee. And we recommended that 
the FCC should only standardize the modulation and transport layers.


It would have been stupid and wasteful to transmit the same content
in multiple parallel streams, to satisfy a bunch of incompatible
receivers.

Why? That's how most OTT services work.

Are OTT services broadcasting 24/7/365, over a constrained amount of 
spectrum? No. The waste this diversity creates for OTT services is in the 
edge servers, which have to make the video available in different formats. 
That's what the CDNs do. If the servers can provide these different streams 
upon request, as unicast streams, then the capacity demands on the last mile 
plants is not going to be increased.

Correct.

And as I pointed out, everything needed for broadcasters to use different 
technologies and formats at the higher layers WAS HAPPENING in parallel on the 
Internet. Smart receivers could be programmed with the resources needed to tune 
and use whatever standards a station used, just as PCs can run multiple apps 
and browser extensions that support different streaming video formats.

This SHOULD BE obvious Bert. You keep telling us everything we need is already 
available using Internet standards and apps.

Really. The FCC receiver mandate is still the law.

No problem. It should be law. But the ATSC standard can, and is, evolving, 
even if it has to go the STB route for updates.  

Nothing has changed Bert.

Nobody is using the new ATSC standards. Nobody is building receivers to support 
them.

The PC evolved continuously; the Internet evolved continuously;
applications and software extensions evolved continuously. ...

Meanwhile with ATSC nothing has changed.

Is it that you still do not understand that the standard is not the problem, 
but the hardware is? Why is it hard to get that a receiver that now costs 
around, I dunno, maybe less than $20, is probably not going to be 
upgradeable? Whereas a PC that costs hundreds of dollars is more upgradeable, 
even though it too, eventually, can't keep up? What is it about this that you 
can't get, Craig?

Why is it that you do not understand that everything needed to implement modern 
streaming video standards is available in a $39 HDMI dongle.

Yes, when the ATSC standard was adopted, there were huge concerns about the 
cost to implement the receivers. The memory buffer requirements for the MPEG-2 
decoder alone was a large expense. 

You tend to forget the fact that early ATSC receivers were expensive and did 
not work well. It took more than a decade to build receivers that worked. The 
DTV transition was postponed several times; the Government cheese STBs did not 
become available until 2008. 

Ironically, most of the problems were related to the modulation layer of the 
standard. By 2008 you were streaming video via the Internet using technologies 
that could easily have been used by broadcasters IF the FCC had not mandated a 
standard locked into 1995 technologies.

There's all kinds of stuff on Roku you cannot watch on your PC. To
do that you would have to pony up some bucks

Is it possible you don't understand this either, Craig? My PC can receive 
anything the Roku can receive, with no problem. Paying for a service is not 
something the PC has to do. On the other hand, there are tons of sites the 
Roku cannot see. The very vast majority of the Internet

Is it possible you do not understand what consumers want Bert? 

Most consumers have multiple devices that can access the Internet. I'm writing 
this message on a tablet - the TV is on just in front of me. I have Macs and 
iPhones that can access all of the sites you are talking about.

People are buying Roku's, Apple TVs, et al to access the entertainment they 
want to see on their big screen TVs. They are not complaining that these boxes 
cannot access the streams from a public service broadcaster in Greenland. And 
they are not using a UI designed for the desktop to use these devices.

But more than 50 million homes have chosen the "limited use" boxes

And probably well over 500 million PCs are out there, in the US. I've said 
this many times, Craig.

And it continues to be TOTALLY IRRELEVANT. At best, only a few million of these 
PCs are used as front ends for the TV in the family room, or any other room for 
that matter. 

If you see a non-neutral, walled up system, designed to remove options from 
consumers, you are automatically in favor. If you see a neutral system, your 
first instinct is to abolish it. It has always been so.

You are clueless. People have been paying for TV entertainment for many 
decades. Most of that entertainment has been delivered over non neutral 
networks using a variety of technologies including VHS and DVD. 

The Internet is simply the newest pipe. If the Internet were truly neutral, all 
of the content I watch would be available. But the reality is that only the 
pipe is neutral. The upper layers that deliver the services are still a 
reflection of the business models industries choose to pursue. 

You think everything people want to watch is already available via your 
"neutral PC." 

It's not. 

Nor is it available via the limited use boxes you despise.

More important, the PC is not the device that content owners and consumers want 
as the front end for TV entertainment. They are investing in more appropriate 
solutions; and the business models are slowing changing.

Regards
Craig





Bert




----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: