[opendtv] Re: FCC CHAIRMAN PROPOSAL TO UNLOCK THE SET-TOP BOX: CREATING CHOICE & INNOVATION

  • From: "Manfredi, Albert E" <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Tue, 16 Feb 2016 02:46:24 +0000

Craig Birkmaier wrote:

Exactly analogous to standardizing only modulation and transport for
ATSC.

Which would have been inadequate for the purpose of deploying a new TV system. 
The ATSC process was not just to create the transport. It was to deploy a new 
"TV app," to use the modern vernacular.

And very soon, corporate networks agreed on more elaborate email
and documentation standards, ...

And none of this had ANYTHING to do with the Internet.

And in this sense, nor did the ATSC process. In other words, Craig, you made an 
inappropriate comparison between apples and oranges. ATSC was to provide an end 
to end TV service. IP's role is providing mainly transport.

And no, it's way too facile to say that the marketplace took care of 
everything. What actually happened was that individual enterprises established 
their own MANDATES, exactly the same as ATSC did, to make things play together 
seamlessly. Soon, the government did the same thing. Business with the 
government had to be done with mandated apps. This is what you ignored. And 
businesses that had to work together, and/or work with the government, found it 
convenient to adopt identical standards. The ATSC process had to manage this 
end-to-end problem on its own, to replace a TV standard that had done exactly 
the same thing for consumers.

We also know that Microsoft was able to create a monopoly with
Windows and Office;

Office for sure, and Windows for reasons I already explained. Windows, and DOS 
before that, could accept apps from any number of third parties, without 
requiring the special blessing of Microsoft. In other words, neutrality. In 
business, neutrality of the tools is a big plus.

As to Office, Microsoft sold the integrated package that seemed to have best 
fit the business community's needs. The important point being, "the Internet" 
is not the only piece of the puzzle, every bit as much as only the modulation 
and MPEG-2 TS are not enough to deploy a digital TV service.

It would have been stupid and wasteful to transmit the same content
in multiple parallel streams, to satisfy a bunch of incompatible
receivers.

Why? That's how most OTT services work.

Are OTT services broadcasting 24/7/365, over a constrained amount of spectrum? 
No. The waste this diversity creates for OTT services is in the edge servers, 
which have to make the video available in different formats. That's what the 
CDNs do. If the servers can provide these different streams upon request, as 
unicast streams, then the capacity demands on the last mile plants is not going 
to be increased.

Obviously, the servers themselves could be simplified if everyone used the same 
standards, but evidently that problem is more tractable, and CDNs have made a 
good business of this. Remember that there is very little actual use of IP 
multicast in ISP networks, to distribute video. The advantages of IP multicast 
are diminished as more and more simulcast multicasts are required.

Really. The FCC receiver mandate is still the law.

No problem. It should be law. But the ATSC standard can, and is, evolving, even 
if it has to go the STB route for updates.  

the desire of the industry leaders to perpetuate an oligopoly business
model with its regulatory protections.

Monopolies, even if they are only local monopolies, require regulation. I don't 
buy your "oligopoly" mantra, Craig, because I bypass the local monopolies. 
Gives me a whole different perspective. You should try it.

It's more than software Bert.

Why are you preaching something back at me that took me eons to get across to 
you, Craig? It took a huge effort to make you get that just software often 
doesn't do the trick. Remember when I explained to you how my WinXP machine 
couldn't keep up with H.264 compression? Why the urge to belabor this back at 
me?

The PC evolved continuously; the Internet evolved continuously;
applications and software extensions evolved continuously. ...

Meanwhile with ATSC nothing has changed.

Is it that you still do not understand that the standard is not the problem, 
but the hardware is? Why is it hard to get that a receiver that now costs 
around, I dunno, maybe less than $20, is probably not going to be upgradeable? 
Whereas a PC that costs hundreds of dollars is more upgradeable, even though it 
too, eventually, can't keep up? What is it about this that you can't get, Craig?

There's all kinds of stuff on Roku you cannot watch on your PC. To
do that you would have to pony up some bucks

Is it possible you don't understand this either, Craig? My PC can receive 
anything the Roku can receive, with no problem. Paying for a service is not 
something the PC has to do. On the other hand, there are tons of sites the Roku 
cannot see. The very vast majority of the Internet.

But more than 50 million homes have chosen the "limited use" boxes

And probably well over 500 million PCs are out there, in the US. I've said this 
many times, Craig. If you see a non-neutral, walled up system, designed to 
remove options from consumers, you are automatically in favor. If you see a 
neutral system, your first instinct is to abolish it. It has always been so.

Bert


 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: