[opendtv] Re: FCC CHAIRMAN PROPOSAL TO UNLOCK THE SET-TOP BOX: CREATING CHOICE & INNOVATION

  • From: Craig Birkmaier <brewmastercraig@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Mon, 15 Feb 2016 08:25:31 -0500


On Feb 14, 2016, at 8:48 PM, Manfredi, Albert E 
<albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Craig Birkmaier wrote:

We recommended that the FCC set the base layer standards needed to
enable digital television broadcasting. We ALSO recommended that they
SHOULD NOT MANDATE the higher layers needed to BEGIN the digital
television transition.

Which was clearly wrong.

In your opinion. 

Clearly it was wrong to mandate the higher layer standards and receivers in 
every TV - my opinion.

If you doubt the validity of this position just look at the Internet.

The Internet sets standards for lower layers. To make use of the Internet, 
initially, much was done only with plain, 7-bit ASCII files. There was 
certainly that standard.

Exactly analogous to standardizing only modulation and transport for ATSC.

And very soon, corporate networks agreed on more elaborate email and 
documentation standards, so that fully finished documents could be shared, as 
opposed to plain text only, and so that standard corporate address books 
could be deployed.

And none of this had ANYTHING to do with the Internet. All of this was the 
result of marketplace competition. And all of it evolved continuously.

So certainly, standards all the way up to layer 7 were established by users 
of the Internet. For example, companies mandated Lotus, WordPerfect, FoxPro, 
and other such products, early on, which is exactly analogous to ATSC A/53 
and A/65 establishing standards for an entirely workable broadcast TV system.

And no doubt broadcasters would have implemented A-53 to get started, without 
the FCC adopting this standard or mandating receivers. They ignored the FCC 
with respect to Table 3.

Perhaps the end result would be exactly the same - we will never know what 
could have happened if the upper layers had been left open to the marketplace. 
But we DO know what happened with the Internet.

We also know that Microsoft was able to create a monopoly with Windows and 
Office; most of the applications you noted above were soon sent to the trash 
heap of history. But Microsoft DID update their ecosystem continuously.

Even more important, as the Internet matured and cloud based processing became 
a viable alternative, the Microsoft monopoly began to erode. Google Docs has 
made major inroads. As the migration from desktop to Mobile and BYOD has gained 
steam, we are seeing even more competition.

These devices have no problem working with the published Office file formats. 
Apple Works is a viable alternative to Office on the Mac and iOS, easily 
interoperating with Office file formats. Just another example of how the 
Internet has enhanced interoperability...

Remember the mantra: interoperable, scalable and extensible?

With respect to Internet video streaming, that mantra is now reality. 

With ATSC - not so much. The ATSC receiver in a brand new TV does nothing 
different than the first ATSC receiver in a TV.

To get DTV initially deployed, of course standards were needed, especially 
because this was a one-way, 24/7/365 broadcast medium. It would have been 
stupid and wasteful to transmit the same content in multiple parallel 
streams, to satisfy a bunch of incompatible receivers.

Why? That's how most OTT services work.

But it's not a matter of transmitting multiple versions of the same stream. A 
station would create a service and consumers would buy receivers that supported 
it. 

Why must a TV be different than your PC? 

CBS decided to use FLASH. We both can use the FLASH plug-in in our desktop 
browsers. CBS ALSO decided to create Apps for Android, iOS, Apple TV, Roku, 
Chromecast and Fire TV.

It was the FCC ATSC receiver mandate that caused the DTV standard to become 
frozen in time, along with the lack of interest to remain competitive by 
broadcasters - no need, as their oligopoly profits are guaranteed.

It is clear the broadcasters only wanted to pursue the existing analog business 
model in digital form, and wait as long as possible to migrate to HDTV. The 
stations could not even choose the Table 3 formats that worked the best for 
them - the networks picked the formats and the stations had little choice but 
to follow. Hence we had 1080i for CBS, PBS and NBC; 720P for ABC; and 480p then 
720p for Fox. Kinda like the corporate IT department mandating Lotus, Word 
Perfect and Office.

Of course, this does not mean that the original upper layer standards had to 
remain fixed for all time.

Really. The FCC receiver mandate is still the law.  

You are correct that there is nothing to prevent broadcasters from delivering 
new formats/services. I have suggested exactly that. 

They can even do this while continuing to use a portion of their bits for 
legacy ATSC compatible streams. They even have a standard to follow - A-72 
defines how to use h.264. But this would require "collusion" with the networks 
and CE industry to create new add on receivers. 

The issue is philosophical - the desire of the industry leaders to perpetuate 
an oligopoly business model with its regulatory protections. They are profiting 
in the short term, but suffering in the long term as a result of this decision. 

Perhaps this is intentional - to encourage consumers to move to a new model 
with fewer middlemen. But retransmission consent is too valuable to discard for 
now. So the slow walk DTV transition continues.

And it's very clear that the ATSC standard allows for as much upgradeability 
as any other digital standard, including IP (with the one-way broadcast 
caveat of course). The only problem being the deployed receivers that won't 
support software updates.

It's more than software Bert. It's like trying to watch a Netflix program on a 
1995 Gateway 486 PC.

Just found these interesting specs for 1995 PCs:
 http://winsupersite.com/article/commentary/blast-buying-computer-1995-141723


Buying Guide Check-list

486 System


CPU - 486DX2-66

Motherboard - ISA with VESA VLB

Memory - 8 Mb

Hard Drive - 420 Mb or more

Monitor - 15” flat screen, .28 dot   pitch

Video Card - 1 Mb video RAM

double speed CD-ROM

16-bit Sound Blaster or 100%  compatible

3-1/2” High Density Floppy Drive

MS-DOS 6.22 / Windows 3.11 (or WfW 3.11)


expected cost: $1100-1500


















Pentium System


CPU - Pentium-90

Motherboard - PCI/ISA combo

Memory - 8 or 16 Mb

Hard Drive - 540 Mb or more

Monitor - 15” flat screen, .28 dot   pitch

Video Card - 1-2 Mb video RAM

double speed CD-ROM

16-bit Sound Blaster or 100%  compatible

3-1/2” High Density Floppy Drive

MS-DOS 6.22 / Windows 3.11 (or WfW 3.11)


expected cost:  $3000-3800

So which approach has worked best Bert?

What works best is to understand the problem and the sensible alternatives. 
If you don't understand the problem, then sensible solutions will escape you.

I outlined the problem and the alternatives. 

The PC evolved continuously; the Internet evolved continuously; applications 
and software extensions evolved continuously. Video streaming is now a reality, 
and devices that bring OTT services to a TV can be purchased starting at $39. 

Meanwhile with ATSC nothing has changed.

So which approach has worked best Bert?

No it's not how things work, Craig. That's the way some companies are trying 
to pervert a good thing, for their own benefit and not the consumers'.

You mean like the ATSC Standard Bert. 

Get over it.

But as usual, when you see a neutral solution you oppose it, and when you see 
proprietary, walled up, isolated schemes you're all in favor. I've pointed 
this out multiple times, Craig.

The Internet pipe is neutral Bert. The services available over that pipe are 
not neutral - the consumer can decide which ones to use, which owns to pay for, 
and how to pay. 

High value entertainment content was not available on PCs (or Macs)
until the systems were completely protected.

Content owners understandably wanted to prevent theft of their content. The 
difference being, the methods agreed upon to prevent theft were available for 
all to use. You did not see individual PC makers bedding down with the 
owners, to get special favors for their box, creating a mutually incompatible 
mess.

You certainly did. But eventually everyone agreed on the hardware and software 
components used to protect that content in PCs today. 

Speaking of collusion, have you ever hear of HD-DVD? Funny how Microsoft was 
able to create a format war that slowed adoption and nearly killed a packaged 
media format for HDTV. You should be thankful, as this strategy was 
specifically targeted at accelerating the window of opportunity for OTT 
services. 

Speaking of clueless. There's nothing on the Roku that I can't get, Craig, 
while there is a practically infinite amount of stuff available on the PC 
that the Roku can't get.

There's all kinds of stuff on Roku you cannot watch on your PC. To do that you 
would have to pony up some bucks for all the services that offer high quality 
entertainment content. But yes, most high quality OTT entertainment content is 
available via web browsers, Android and iOS devices, and connected TV devices.

As for the infinite availability via your PC, who cares? Hardly anyone watches 
this stuff. And if they want to, almost any website can be mirrored to the big 
screen from my iPad or iPhone - even Amazon Prime.

Are you really that out of touch with reality? When you claim that there are 
many "sources" of content for AppleTV, you are showing me the equivalent of 
*a* portal. Such as Amazon, or Netflix. But for instance, can you stream KNR 
TV from Greenland?

Yes. If there was a compelling reason to do so.

Why not? It's TV, it's available on the Internet, why should anyone allow a 
third party to block access to it?

Nobody is blocking access to it Bert. It works just fine on my iPAD - by the 
way KNR is offline at the moment.

You really need to get over this notion that the Internet is limited and 
defined by a PC based web browser. Nobody is mandating how you get content onto 
the TV screen connected to your TV. That's YOUR choice. 

But more than 50 million homes have chosen the "limited use" boxes you despise. 
 Apparently the limits they impose are not a major issue. 

Regards
Craig

Other related posts: