[opendtv] Re: FCC CHAIRMAN PROPOSAL TO UNLOCK THE SET-TOP BOX: CREATING CHOICE & INNOVATION

  • From: "Manfredi, Albert E" <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Mon, 15 Feb 2016 01:48:52 +0000

Craig Birkmaier wrote:

We recommended that the FCC set the base layer standards needed to
enable digital television broadcasting. We ALSO recommended that they
SHOULD NOT MANDATE the higher layers needed to BEGIN the digital
television transition.

Which was clearly wrong.

If you doubt the validity of this position just look at the Internet.

The Internet sets standards for lower layers. To make use of the Internet, 
initially, much was done only with plain, 7-bit ASCII files. There was 
certainly that standard. And very soon, corporate networks agreed on more 
elaborate email and documentation standards, so that fully finished documents 
could be shared, as opposed to plain text only, and so that standard corporate 
address books could be deployed. So certainly, standards all the way up to 
layer 7 were established by users of the Internet. For example, companies 
mandated Lotus, WordPerfect, FoxPro, and other such products, early on, which 
is exactly analogous to ATSC A/53 and A/65 establishing standards for an 
entirely workable broadcast TV system.

To get DTV initially deployed, of course standards were needed, especially 
because this was a one-way, 24/7/365 broadcast medium. It would have been 
stupid and wasteful to transmit the same content in multiple parallel streams, 
to satisfy a bunch of incompatible receivers.

Of course, this does not mean that the original upper layer standards had to 
remain fixed for all time. And it's very clear that the ATSC standard allows 
for as much upgradeability as any other digital standard, including IP (with 
the one-way broadcast caveat of course). The only problem being the deployed 
receivers that won't support software updates.

So which approach has worked best Bert?

What works best is to understand the problem and the sensible alternatives. If 
you don't understand the problem, then sensible solutions will escape you.

We've talked about A-90, the Data Broadcast standard.

A90 allows for a whole lot more than just data broadcast. I've pointed out many 
times to you, Craig, the flexibility A/90 introduces. The remaining constraint 
being, it's still a strictly one-way broadcast network.

CLUE: one of these standards allows broadcasters to use h.264.
But nobody is doing it.

Clue to Craig: you just disproved your assertion. The fact is, H.264 is 
possible to implement over ATSC, as is H.265. So at the very least, your should 
get past your disproven rhetoric from many years ago.

No Bert. It entrenched legacy technologies

ATSC supported HDTV in multiple modes, SDTV in multiple modes, multichannel 
sound, etc. None of this was "entrenched legacy," Craig. You seem to have 
fixated on the interlace OPTION, strangely, as being evil enough to ignore that 
progressive scan options are plentiful too. Just as now you seem to be fixated 
on H.264 compression, even though it is already obsolescent.

I saw no evidence of LG, or Samsung, or anyone else, each having to
get in bed separately with CBS,

Because there was no need - the TV manufacturers paid to create a
standard the content owners were comfortable with;

And there is no need now either! Now, the equipment manufacturers pay to create 
their separate walled up, incompatible standards, and then have to get in bed 
with the content owners. Even though the content owners are already using 
standards they're satisfied with, for anyone to use. You make no sense, Craig. 

Yes the companies behind the streaming boxes are cutting deals - that's
how things work,

No it's not how things work, Craig. That's the way some companies are trying to 
pervert a good thing, for their own benefit and not the consumers'. But as 
usual, when you see a neutral solution you oppose it, and when you see 
proprietary, walled up, isolated schemes you're all in favor. I've pointed this 
out multiple times, Craig.

High value entertainment content was not available on PCs (or Macs)
until the systems were completely protected.

Content owners understandably wanted to prevent theft of their content. The 
difference being, the methods agreed upon to prevent theft were available for 
all to use. You did not see individual PC makers bedding down with the owners, 
to get special favors for their box, creating a mutually incompatible mess.

You have no clue what your talking about Bert. Your wife tells you
about new stuff on her Roku, while you hunt for free stuff on your PC.

Speaking of clueless. There's nothing on the Roku that I can't get, Craig, 
while there is a practically infinite amount of stuff available on the PC that 
the Roku can't get. Are you really that out of touch with reality? When you 
claim that there are many "sources" of content for AppleTV, you are showing me 
the equivalent of *a* portal. Such as Amazon, or Netflix. But for instance, can 
you stream KNR TV from Greenland? Why not? It's TV, it's available on the 
Internet, why should anyone allow a third party to block access to it?

Bert


 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at 
FreeLists.org 

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: